Hot answers tagged

79

It's the folder where iTunes saves the backUps of your iDevice. And it takes so much space because each time you sync a device, previous backUps are not deleted. Deleting the folder will, then, mean losing those backUps. Doing this regularly is advised for saving HD space. Just make sure to make a new backUp afterwards, and that you won't need those ...


31

Download OmniDiskSweeper and analyze your hard drive. OmniDiskSweeper will show you the files on your drive, in descending order by size, and letting you decide what to do with them. Delete away, but exercise caution. OmniDiskSweeper will show detail of space usage: Select System and start cleaning. It could be the Time Machine backup file ...


25

swapfile0, swapfile1 and so on are swap files. You can sort of think of them like "backup" RAM. When your computer doesn't have enough RAM to accomodate the memory requests of all your programs (which is almost always, this is normal), it uses these files to "write out" part of what it had in RAM. The sleepimage has a very similar use, except it's used only ...


23

This could easily be explained as the 120 MB of used data is likely for the data all the apps store in iCloud. Contacts, calendars, specific third party apps can have storage in iCloud. You can determine this by looking at the Manage Storage pane in settings app (see below). The warning you describe comes up when the expected size of the next backup is ...


20

Carbon Copy Cloner should do the job. CCC (Carbon Copy Cloner) creates a bootable backup, and preserves all your files, and in the right hierarchy. You can also have incremental backups (it only backs up items that have changed since the last backup). You can schedule CCC to backup regularly. CCC also has the ability to backup over a network. I also like the ...


20

In a nutshell: No, you can't. Apple uses proprietary protocols for iCloud access (both data and backup) so you can't just switch backends by redirecting some DNS entries. And as far as I know, nobody has reverse engineered the protocols yet (at least not the full set required to implement an alternative server-side solution).


19

Yes and no. Flash storage is storage that uses electronically programmable and erasable memory modules with no moving parts. It refers to a very specific implementation of data storage. It can come in different packages though: wrapped in a hard, plastic envelope you slide in to your camera; mounted to a PCB stick with exposed connectors and docked inside ...


19

You can use an external hard disk formatted with HFS+ as a Time Machine target for several Macs without problems. Time Machine itself will make sure that the data is not getting mixed up by using the name of each Mac as part of the path.


15

App containers include a folder called Caches. This folder can be emptied by iOS when storage becomes low. iOS chooses apps which you use rarely and apps which have large quantities of cache stored to be cleaned first. iOS shows the app name as "Cleaning…" briefly on the home screen when this process takes place. There are other system caches which can be ...


14

You can store and run applications in the non-standard /Application location on OS X, which means you can keep things on your external drive and run them from there. You just have to be aware of the limitations of doing it this way: The applications and data on the drive won't be available when it's not connected.Seems obvious but this can come up in ...


14

The other 6 GB are OS itself. The given capacity is a value for the physical storage that the phone has, not the amount that can be used by the owner. iOS is about 6 GB in size on its own. Also, the formatted capacity is less than the size of the chips that are manufactured into the device. It's in a very small footnote at the bottom of the tech specs for ...


13

There's no difference besides the storage capacity. As the iPhone does not have an option to extend the memory after purchase, you have to choose the right amount of storage right from the beginning. You can always manage how much space you use by manually choosing which data to sync (music, photos, movies, apps). Generally more available space gives you ...


13

If you don’t already, I want to suggest in the strongest terms possible that you have a Time Machine backup of your data. A portable 1TB hard drive is not expensive and you can plug it in and Time Machine will prompt you if you want to use it for backups. I would do that before proceeding with any answers provided (mine included). As for that huge 89GB of ...


12

Short answer, no. The measuring tool you are using doesn't take the time to deduct the space saved when files are hard linked, so it over-counts the space used. The Libraries are using 'hard links' to the real location of the files, so both appear to be approximately the same size, but each actual photo is only located in one place on your hard drive, with ...


12

The Solution I used a storage scanning application to see where all the space was going. I used DaisyDisk, but Disk Inventory X is another option Turns out ImageMagick image editing library was rampantly creating large files at /private/var/tmp


11

There is a bug in Pages. When you export a file in ".doc" or ".docx" format it embeds 489KB PNG files (a single one in a docx file, three in a doc file). These files are intended to be used as the background fill on default shapes, but they are present whether they are used or not. I documented the bug here. And reported it to Apple as rdar://17089255. At ...


11

What to do when you do not have enough storage because your backup size is too large: Delete the current backup on your iCloud for that specific iOS device. Your iCloud backup is now automatically turned off, so turn it back on. A new backup is made and has a reasonable size. Theoretically your phone could crash in the short while you do not have a backup, ...


11

I fixed it on mine, it was to do with the BELLMIN' Time Machine Queue Backup files (i.e. files that meant to go onto the Time Machine but haven't been moved yet due to the TM not reachable or away from home etc). Do the following (no need to buy or download any additional tools): Go to Terminal List all TM objects by doing the following sudo tmutil ...


11

No need to backup or restore anything ! I just spent some time with a good Apple Care advisors : this problem is caused by iCloud Drive. If you deactivate it, no more problem. It worked for me.


10

Shirt Pocket's SuperDuper is a nice app, but it is pricey. $28, free trial available. One of its good features: It allows you to perform an incremental backup that only updates what's changed.


10

I reset my iPhone and recover the backup data. My all installed apps and data are seemingly maintained well, but its storage usage became changed: about 7 GB of new free space came out. Also, it’s reported in the same way by both iTunes and iOS settings. I’m still not aware of the cause, but my problem was anyway solved.


9

Your question is hard to answer because you don't mention the layer you are looking at. There at least four layers to consider: Hardware layer Usually the hardware consists of some administrative blocks, the "payload" blocks and some spare blocks. A hard drive contains some dozen and an SSD drive up to 15% of the official size of spare/reserve blocks. ...


9

Getting the SMART status is possible with these disks but not if they are attached to USB. The necessary ATA commands usually aren't propagated through the USB-controller. You can try to get that working though by using OS X SAT SMART Driver.


9

You can find Mail's cached mails in ~/Library/Mail To see how much space this folder is using, either use Finder's Get Info or du -hs ~/Library/Mail To remove the folder and all its contents, either use Finder or rm -rf ~/Library/Mail AFAIK, I don't think you can stop Mail from caching received emails from your servers. There used to be an option in ...


9

It's the difference between the decimal value and the binary prefix. In this case, it's saying you are using 0 binary bytes. What's the difference? Using "Giga" as our example, it means 10003 of something (i.e. Gigahertz). In computers it poses an interesting problem: A Gigabyte is 10003 bytes. However a byte is 8 (binary) bits. Which means it's ...


8

The specs page for the iPod Classic says "hard drive". That's a mechanical drive with a set of spinning platters and read/write heads. And here's a replacement part for the drive in the unit. The compatibility list on that page lists: iPod 6th Gen 160GB iPod 7th Gen 160GB And here's a video that gives some details on the Samsung drive in the unit: http://...


8

Other than cost (for the initial purchase and potentially to repair or replace it) and size, there is no measurable difference in performance, battery life or other function between any of the iPhone 5 models for sale (and certainly within the same carrier in case one LTE model uses slightly more power than another). The same goes for each iPhone (and iPad ...


8

The Ars Technica iOS 8 Thoroughly Reviewed article pegs it at 600MB difference on the iPhone 5. DEVICE SPACE AVAILABLE (IOS 7.1.2) SPACE AVAILABLE (IOS 8.0 GM) 32GB iPhone 4S (AT&T) 27.4GB 26.6GB 32GB iPhone 5 (VZW) 27.3GB 26.7GB 32GB iPhone 5C (AT&T) 27.2GB 26.5GB 64GB iPhone 5S (AT&T) 56.0GB 55.1GB


8

I'm pretty sure I have your answer! I just had the same problem myself. It seems that the Photos app has a "nice feature" called "Recently Deleted" that CONTINUES TO KEEP deleted photos on your device for a certain period of time. SO ... Just click on your photos app, then click on its RECENTLY DELETED folder, then empty its contents. Hope that helps!


8

Your iCloud storage is how much data you can keep online, in the cloud. This is variable, depending on how much you pay, for what you need. Your first 5GB is free. The iPhone itself has a fixed hardware memory, or space, which can only be chosen when you buy it, in 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, or 256 GB configurations. The total you see in Settings > General > ...


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