5

Try to use ddrescue, which should do a block-to-block copy of your hard drive. Then mount the copy with hdiutil and you might be able to find your files. Basically: ddrescue /dev/rdisk12 /path/to/save/the/copy ddrescue.log Note: you can interrupt the process whenever you want. The progress will be saved to the map file, ddrescue.log. And then hdiutil ...


3

I just needed to resize the container (because apparently that's a simple thing to do). I first had to restart into recovery mode and run firstaid on the container. I ran it on all 3 of the drive, the container, and the volume to be safe, but I'm certain only the run on the container did anything. Then I restarted and logged in and in a terminal ran the ...


3

I am wondering if it's safely guaranteed No. Period. Nothing is "safely guaranteed." Generally speaking (as at the time of this answer your question is lacking in detail), you can (re)partition without corruption of your data. That's not to say the process is infallible. Problems happen, mistakes can be made. This is why is so important to have a ...


3

No - exFAT / FAT / MS-DOS are not embeddable within APFS easily out of the box. Try to not use these if you want easy. Use external disks for all these needs. Yes is only if you can keep your data within APFS. You can make many volumes in the overall container and all share free space. This operation has been done hundreds of times on my test macs and I’ve ...


2

You can resize your partitions with much more safety than just crossing your fingers and hoping there aren't any files in the section you are giving to the new partition, but you should still back up your hard drive. Once you have made a backup and unplugged the backup, go to Disk Utility to make the changes. If you give us more details in the question we ...


2

The fastest port on this machine seems to be the Thunderbolt 2 interface at 20Gbps. Are there any drives that would get anywhere near that? Chances are very unlikely. Why? Several reasons: Thunderbolt 2 has been deprecated in favor of Thunderbolt 3 since late 2015. The market for these devices were small to begin with and is shrinking more quickly with ...


1

Apple recommends using APFS for SSDs. You cannot use APFS with a Time Machine Backup Drive. If you are planning on using it for two things, storing files, and Time Machine, then I would recommend partitioning the SSD and then making the one for storing your music, etc. APFS and to use Time Machine, simply go into Time Machine Preferences and then select the ...


1

You appear to have two questions/issues: 1) A Linux system has "boot jacked" your boot manager/boot loader, messing up Windows. 2) Hiding above system from macOS. You could give rEFInd a try to fix/manage your boot issues. It should solve 1 but not 2 per se. There may be a solution for 2 here: How to prevent auto mounting of a volume in macOS High ...


1

I think you bought a NVMe SSD, did you ? What model is your new SSD ? macOS High Sierra was the first to support NVMe SSDs, that would explain why El Capitan can't see yours. You may want to try cmd-alt-R at boot in order to boot the latest macOS Recovery available for your Mac from the internet. It should be Catalina, which supports NVMe SSDs.


1

To convert a container to free space requires two commands. For example, disk0s3 is a APFS container. To convert to free space, you would need to enter the following commands. sudo diskutil apfs deleteContainer disk0s3 sudo diskutil eraseVolume free none disk0s3 Free space can be added to a container, if the free space reside immediately after the ...


1

You need to first remove all those unneeded EFI partitions. sudo diskutil erasevolume free none disk0s6 sudo diskutil erasevolume free none disk0s5 sudo diskutil erasevolume free none disk0s4 sudo diskutil erasevolume free none disk0s3 sudo diskutil apfs resizeContainer disk0s2 0


1

A decent device would be any USB 3.1 external SSD, such as the Samsung T5, benchmarked at c. 500 MB/s. The X5 is a Thunderbolt model with much higher speeds (c. 2,500 MB/s), but much more expensive. Speed is not usually crucial for backups, as a complete restore is hopefully a rarity. It's usually recommended to choose a backup drive that is 2 or 3 times ...


1

I suggest that you get OmniDiskSweeper.app and run it on your main drive. it will list the items and their size on the disk sorted by size. You can look for items that take up a lot of disk space and go down the directory tree from there to find the large memory users. Its a free app.


1

This definitley sounds like your partition wasn't completely removed. Please note that the best way to get rid of a BootCamp Partition is to go to BootCamp Assistant and remove it. The first step you should try is opening BootCamp Assistant and then checking if you can merge the partitions so that all the data on Windows is destroyed and the space used is ...


1

This is achievable for sure. First, you need to transfer files and then change your HDD. This Apple tutorial shows how to transfer the Time Machine backups. Transfer Time Machine backups from one backup disk to another Here in this iFixit link, it's a how-to tutorial for the HDD Replacement. Apple Time Capsule Model A1302 Hard Drive Replacement I ...


1

I think I have what I needed (a combined drive) all of it available for use. It is now listed as a Fusion drive even though both its components are SSDs. Here are the steps I used to combine the 2 drives. If you're using macOS Mojave or later - Turn on your Mac, then immediately press and hold Command-R to start up from macOS Recovery. Release the keys ...


1

SSDs simply do not conform to this paradigm at all. There is no inside or outside, early or late, beginning or end, partition border, or any of the old things you associate with spinny rust Hard Drives. SSDs allocate storage of any data sector entirely where their wear-levelling algorithms decide is 'next favourite'. It is well beyond the prediction of us ...


1

Your thinking is correct. It’s likely the hard drive, however it could also be SATA cable. Given that it’s inexpensive, it makes sense to charge it out with the replacement drive. However, to know for certain, connect your drive to a USB to SATA adapter, if the drive works properly, then you have proof positive it’s the cable. Doing diagnostics on a drive ...


1

Short term: hold CMD+S on power on, wait till you land in console, look at what the system tells, take a look at dmesg | less command and see if it spills any disk related errors. check: fsck_apfs -fyd / although this does assume you can get to the console by booting internal add. Long term: Boot any decent Linux from USB with holding C on power on. I ...


1

I booted osx from an external drive and used disk utility to select internal drive and erase the drive completely giving me back full disk space. probably back up first :)


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