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Some disks (like Transcent Jetdrive disks) need specific drivers and do not function under and OS older than 10.12.. Try and boot into the different options for recovery (like Command-R / Option-Command-R / Shift-Option-Command-R) and see if the disk is recognized in any of the versions. Apple gear boots from external drives easily so you can always get a ...


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It sounds like you've somehow installed a MacOS installer disk onto your internal drive. Then you're booting up to that, and trying to install the OS over itself, or trying to partition the volume of the running system. Boot to Recovery (Command R at restart) and wipe the disk from there. Then install the OS.


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The install didn’t do well. If you have a good backup, I would perform another erase install (or the first erase install if you just reinstalled the OS. Apple doesn’t define a factory reset, so we have no clue what that means unless you reference a written process you performed). https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204904 What makes an erase install is step ...


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I solved this by using the command: diskutil eraseVolume "Free Space" %noformat% disk0s2


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To troubleshoot this, here are the questions I’d ask: What partition is it booting from? If your booting from disk1s6 it's no wonder it giving you the message as it's only 10.9GB in size and the OS will easily fill that up with updates and other stuff. Also, define "restoring to factory settings" as this could mean different things. Did you erase the ...


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The solution was to use a Windows computer with an SD card socket to read the card and transfer the files. Before that, I tried the following methods mentioned in the answers and the comments. The YUTU PRO smartphone application could transfer small files and not large ones (more details below). The retailer had no idea about the problem or solutions. I did ...


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Your posted output, from sudo fdisk /dev/disk2, shows a * next to the number 2. This means partition 2 is flagged in the MBR table as the bootable partition. The * should be next to the number 1, because I assume this is your bootable Windows partition. You can use the sudo fdisk -e /dev/disk2 command to move the *. This command is interactive. The ...


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