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7

From what I'm gathering you want to see if anyone accessed your computer to make a backup of it. I found this thread which might answer your question for how to retrieve the time machine backup logs from your Mac. Run the following command in Terminal log show --style syslog --predicate 'senderImagePath contains[cd] "TimeMachine"' --info which will show ...


4

All relevant UUIDs and other Time Machine metadata are stored in /Library/Preferences/com.apple.TimeMachine.plist on the host side (the Mac to be backed up)! The file contains (probably the old) hostUUID (hardware), destination volume UUID (backup volume) and all IncludedVolumeUUIDs (source volumes). To get your current volume IDs use diskutil info diskXsY ...


3

If you want a local backup you can run a bash script that creates an archive of your home directory. zip -r pathToBackup.zip /Users/username This can be expanded upon with bash to: Add password protection and encryption with the --encrypt option Run automatically at certain times with cron Append timestamps to name of backup file Keep only a certain ...


2

Even without having configured Time Machine, you can manually create a localsnapshot with the command tmutil snapshot. So setting up a scheduled task to run this command should be straightforward. There's no point or need to specify which folders to backup: like TM, snapshots only record the changes made to the disk. So if you work on a handful of files, ...


2

I think this might help: The Time Machine Mechanic (T2M2) – a quick but thorough check of Time Machine backing up It’s a free tool from Howard Oakley, who describes it this way: T2M2 analyses your logs to discover whether Time Machine backups have been running normally, reporting any worrying signs or errors. You do not need to be able to read or ...


2

Building upon the information provided in @klanomath's answer, I was able to figure out a specific solution to my exact case (others may differ). In my case the problem was the extended attributes attached to the machine directory, for some reason Time Machine didn't like them. However, after forcing the correct values in I was able to sort these out. If ...


1

You could use rsync and append a suffix with the date and time as described in this SO answer Use rsync for backup without overwrite For example (you would change the source and destination directories) rsync -aE --backup --suffix=`date +'.%F_%H-%M'` ~/Documents/WantedFiles/ ~/Documents/Backup/ This will copy everything (including extended attributes ...


1

It depends on the app: Non-Apple applications states or data can be found in ~/Library/Application Support/ usually. Copying the folder named as the app to the respective path in your new system should restore most things. This works for Firefox and Chrome. It's also adviseable to copy the content of ~/Library/Saved Application State/. Some Apple apps ...


1

iOS Data Storage Guidelines See Apple's iOS Data Storage Guidelines as a starting point. This documentation is written for developers of iOS applications: Overview iCloud includes Backup, which automatically backs up a user’s iOS device daily over Wi-Fi. Everything in your app’s home directory is backed up, with the exception of the application ...


1

I believe you can do this with Time Machine. You could set Time Machine to do a backup hourly or daily. Then tell time machine to only backup the specific folders with the data you want to backup. Time machine saves all backups until the drive you are saving to is full. The backups should be very small so a disk will hold a lot of daily backups. You can ...


1

It seems there is rare chance to get the deleted app data back for your iPhone. Maybe you can ask some tools, like Dr.fone, Joyoshare iPhone Data Recovery, D-back, etc. to try to check whether you can find the deleted iPhone app data. Take it relex. It's just advised to do as I recently lost my photos and use one of them to check. Note that all tools support ...


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