123

The solution to disabling the "almost full" and "full" notification is to disable the daemon responsible for it: launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchAgents/com.apple.diskspaced.plist or launchctl stop com.apple.diskspaced Alternatively, if you only want to prevent the "almost full" from appearing so often then you can lower the GB threshold via: ...


82

It's the folder where iTunes saves the backUps of your iDevice. And it takes so much space because each time you sync a device, previous backUps are not deleted. Deleting the folder will, then, mean losing those backUps. Doing this regularly is advised for saving HD space. Just make sure to make a new backUp afterwards, and that you won't need those ...


57

Although it's not directly related to the Xcode app size. There are multiple places where you can delete files to free up some space. 1. Derived Data Xcode keeps data about your projects which includes index, build output and logs. Go to ~/Library/Developer/Xcode/DerivedData/ and delete the folders for projects that you no longer need to keep this data ...


44

macOS Mojave See: How to access a launch daemon's values/ system defaults value macOS Sierra On Sierra this command didn't work for me: launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchAgents/com.apple.diskspaced.plist due to System Integrity Protection engaged, so to stop the diskspaced service, run: launchctl stop com.apple.diskspaced Note: Use start ...


42

Spoiler: I went from ~50 GBs free to ~277 GBs free, about 227 GBs difference, over the course of this answer. There's not a tonne of information from the basic tmutil function but you can call man tmutil to get more details, specifically on thinlocalsnapshots: thinlocalsnapshots mount_point [purge_amount] [urgency] Thin local Time Machine ...


32

OmniGroup offers a free utility called OmniDisksweeper which lists files/folders sorted by size. OmniDiskSweeper is really great at what it does: showing you the files on your drive, in descending order by size, and letting you delete them easily! It scans your disks as quickly as possible and shows you the facts — if a file doesn't make the cut to stay, ...


29

Starting with macOS Sierra, macOS comes with an built in app from Apple called Storage Management, which is a part of the System Information app. In different tabs it shows you the largest apps installed, as well as a folder viewer with their sizes listed. A special tab shows the largest files over all of your folders, which I find very practical. To launch ...


28

I think Disk Inventory is as fast or slow as any of the others. If the disk is big, it's slower than on a little one, and of course, on an SSD it is really fast. Although it is from 2006, I think it isn't bad coded, and it still works on my 10.9. It gives more info than you need, but you can ignore that, as long as you find what you need. I guess what takes ...


28

Do you have Time Machine backups turned on? If so, the difference may be due to space used for "local snapshots" (essentially, backups to the local disk when your real backup disk is not available). Local snapshots are automatically deleted when the space is needed for something else (actually, it starts purging them when the volume reaches 80% full), so the ...


25

On Mojave 10.14.4 I was able to reclaim 50GB of space with: sh-3.2# tmutil listlocalsnapshots / com.apple.TimeMachine.2019-04-03-103122 sh-3.2# tmutil deletelocalsnapshots 2019-04-03-103122 Deleted local snapshot '2019-04-03-103122' Local snapshots are typically created during Time Machine automatic backups. It is not clear why this local snapshot was ...


25

I recently ran into this - on my 500GB SSD, my free space was only 5% where I expected more like 75%. I found an answer in a blog that worked for me: Apple state that they automatically remove local snapshots when disk space is low, but their definition of low is apparently only 5GB of free space remaining – not really much free working space in 2017 when ...


20

The temporary location that stores downloading files varies between computers. Here's how to find it: Start a rather large app store download Open Activity monitor, and select the storedownloadd process. (storeagent for 10.9 and below) Open the Inspector (press the "i" button, or ⌘+i) Select the Open Files and Ports tab, and scroll to the bottom Select the ...


20

Perhaps a more elegant solution would to be use the command line tools instead of Xcode. You could delete Xcode entirely (or skip the install). Instead of downloading and installing Xcode - open the command line (terminal app works out of the box) and type gcc. That will pop up a window where you can install the command line tools. Click install, click ...


16

The space is most likely being occupied by the various files and folders in ~/Library, which is hidden by default on OS X. You can show the Library folder by navigating to your home folder in Finder, pressing ⌘J and showing the Library folder. Furthermore, you can run the following command in your home folder which will list all the files and folders in ...


15

GrandPerspective can create a Treemap:


13

try: docker system prune -a https://docs.docker.com/engine/reference/commandline/system_prune/ Remove all unused containers, networks, images (both dangling and unreferenced), and optionally, volumes.


12

On High Sierra the command will be: sudo tmutil disable localsnapshot.


12

You don't need any tools if you care to use Apple's included tools. Start with System Information and the About this Mac Menu bar item in the Apple Menu. select the Apple Menu About this Mac More Info Storage (top left of the window between Displays and Memory) This tool uses the spotlight data, so if it seems off you can reset spotlight and leave the mac ...


12

You can simply enter Time Machine and select folders, apps, and files and select to delete all backup copies of that item. The command line tmutil compare also gives exhaustive detail of what changed between backup intervals if you don't mind using the terminal and a UNIX shell. Even without shell tools, you can micromanage storage from the Time Machine GUI ...


12

try du -sh * | grep -E "\dG" to get all files and folders of size 1G and above. (Output will only show once du is done)


12

/private has been around for a loooooong time. Every Mac has it. It is part of your Mac: the directory stores essential system files and caches, along with other databases that your system requires to operate. I'll give a quick explanation contents of the folders /private/etc, /private/tmp, and /private/var, usually found in /private: /private/etc Data ...


12

Try sudo ncdu instead. As a normal admin or user you are not allowed to scan the content of certain folders (all indicated by an error while scanning and in the final listing by a dot - if a subfolder can't be scanned - or an exclamation mark - if the whole folder is excluded from scanning due to missing read permissions!). Examples (only the big six and ...


12

I cracked the code! Preface This seems to have worked fine for me, but there are no guarantees. DO NOT PROCEED WITHOUT A BACKUP OF YOUR DATA. Then again, you know that, you voluntarily installed a beta operating system. 😜 The root of this issue seems to be a failure in deleting APFS snapshots made by Time Machine. Under healthy operation, old snapshots ...


11

This is a feature of the default set up of Mail.app on OS X. It is storing all your messages for "offline viewing" you can turn this off. Go to Mail > Preferences click on Accounts Click on your Gmail account on the left Then click on the Advanced tab. Under "Keep copies of messages for offline viewing" set that drop-down to "Don't keep copies of any ...


11

Theoretically, there should only be updates in that folder until you actually run the updates, then they should be cleared - so my first suggestion would be to check the App Store app & run any pending updates from there, reboot, then recheck the folder. Anything left over at that point ought to be safe to delete, though I would retain the index.plist ...


11

Spotify have a useful docker image called docker-gc which will clean up unused images. As per the Github page for it, you can run it as a container itself: docker run --rm -v /var/run/docker.sock:/var/run/docker.sock -v /etc:/etc spotify/docker-gc I have that aliased to docker-gc which I run periodically to clean things up.


11

I think this notification is a bug. I have 760GB free on my drive (a 1TB drive) and still get this same notification every morning since upgrading to Sierra. I enabled Optimize Storage (but not Store in iCloud).


10

The How can I figure out what's slowly eating my HD space? provides a general approach to answering your question. Graph and Find You can use a tool like GrandPerspective to help highlight large files on your Mac: Disk Inventory X is an alternative disk space visualizer: Ask VideoBlend's Developers Consider contacting the makers of VideoBlend, via ...


10

The answer is that yes, you are allowed to delete files from /private/var/folders/. The command sudo rm -r -P /private/var/folders/tr/* was able to work and no crashes came of it. Some errors were issued by the command, but no errors came from the system as a whole. I might issue a new post later on when I know more about this to understand what Apple did ...


10

You'll need about 20GB free to do the install when you consider the space needed for holding/swapping files with the .dmg during the install process. I saw this in the Apple developer forums: Have a look at About This Mac → Storage tab. You might see a purple segment labeled "Backups." That's the local Time Machine cache, and it doesn't show up ...


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