70

If you're comfortable using the terminal, you might be able to figure out what the file is. If you're not comfortable using terminal, I wouldn't worry about doing this. I was doing this mainly for my own interest rather than any real need. Open terminal and enter the following commands (enter the text following the $): $ cd /lost+found $ ls -l total ...


26

I use cp -Rfv sourcefile destinationfile with success on a pretty regular basis. cp = copy R = maintains file hierarchies f = if an existing destination file cannot be opened, remove it and try again v = verbose mode, displays files transferred as it progresses sourcefile = data you want to copy destinationfile = directory/drive you want to copy to


23

Try Gnu ddrescue -- it's a data recovery program that does block-based copying with corrupt data recovery during the copy operations. You can get it for OS X if you're using Homebrew by typing in an Terminal window: brew install ddrescue A guide on arstechnica describes how to rescue a failed disk using ddrescue. Make sure you read through the guide, as it ...


15

I have one hard drive connected to my iMac for use with Time Machine. In addition to the Time Machine backup, I maintain a bootable clone of my iMac's hard drive using SuperDuper. The hard drive with the bootable backup is stored at my in-laws' house (you could just as easily store it at a friend's house or at work). The off-site clone is updated once a week....


15

You can try this but please make sure you backup first: Boot to single-user mode, hold down the command (i.e. cloverleaf or Apple) and "s" keys as the system begins to boot. To Debug, Repair, Force (and fix errors automatically) /sbin/fsck_hfs -drfy /dev/disk0s2 To scan for bad blocks: /sbin/fsck_hfs -S /dev/disk0s2 Assuming disk0s2 is the one you are ...


12

On Snow Leopard, you would need to boot from an external OS to wipe the drive. On Mountain Lion (or Lion), the system makes a recovery HD so you can self-wipe the Mac. This is a much, much faster and easier task, so I recommend you upgrade first and then do the wiping using a recovery boot and Disk Utility. I personally would do these steps (and you could ...


12

My goal was to copy files to the external hard drive. They are stored in Macintosh HD (I originally thought I will find Macintosh HD in a subfolder of OS X Base System - wrong assumption). There was no Macintosh HD in Volumes folder, because I first needed to unlock it (I use FileVault). First you need to find the lvUUID of your Macintosh HD. Use this ...


12

Finder is probably just counting the /Users/Shared folder or other public folders. You probably don't have permission to the folders containing data for the user, so even though the data is there, Finder can't enumerate it to calculate the size. All you need to do is navigate within the Users folder and give yourself permission to the inaccessible folders (e....


11

I would try using rsync from the command line. rsync -av --ignore-errors /Volumes/failingDrive/ /Volumes/brandNewDrive should do the trick. Mind the trailing / at the end of the source. Rsync will not copy files it finds on the destination, so if you call it a second time it will continue where it left off.


11

File in lost+found are fragments of files that have been found by a disk repair job (usually ran through disk utility). A more clear explanation in this thread. Extract: If you run fsck, the filesystem check and repair command, it might find data fragments that are not referenced anywhere in the filesystem. In particular, fsck might find data that looks ...


10

First step, use a low level tool like dd to make an image of the drive as it exists now, and then stop using the drive. Every second that drive spends connected to a computer (especially a Mac) is a chance for something new to be written to it on top of data you want to recover. All of your recovery attempts should be performed on the image that you make. ...


9

From the Apple Support pages Securely erasing a disk To securely erase a disk or partition: In Disk Utility, select the disk or partition to erase, and then click Erase. Specify a format, and enter a name for the disk. Click Security Options and choose to write over the data once, 7 times, or 35 times. Click OK. Click Erase. Writing ...


9

The chances of recovering the directory structure & therefore the data intact in its original form are minimal. Time Machine uses a complex structure of links to files in order to reduce disk usage & preserve the actual timeline. You may be able to recover specific individual files if you absolutely need something recovered from the history - ...


8

You do not like the cloud - yet, I will suggest online backup solutions for a worst-case-scenario, because I believe that they're the most reliable. better data retention and preservation, after all your hard disk is prone to data loss since it's a magnetic device online backups are not prone to house robbery since they are stored in a different location ...


8

As current hard drive-oriented techniques for file sanitization are ineffective on SSDs, I recommend to encrypt the whole hard drive using Filevault 2 (best if you did this before you put your data onto it). (This is only possible in Lion, Filevault 1 in older versions of MacOS will only encrypt your home folder.) This way you will not erase your data, but ...


7

Boot up in Recovery Mode (Command + R) add attach an external drive via USB. Then open the Terminal to copy files using the command line. All disks are available under /Volumes.


7

You can use the terminal to do this. The following command should work: find /path/to/the/folder \ -name "*.jpg" \ -exec bash -c "sips -g pixelHeight -g pixelWidth {} | grep -E ' [12]?[0-9]{0,2}$' >/dev/null" \;\ -print That command will find all JPEG files under /path/to/the/folder which have a width or a height of between 1 and 299 pixels. ...


7

Under certain circumstances a deleted external HFS+ encrypted volume can be recovered after the disk has been formatted to a FAT32 volume: The whole disk has been encrypted (to one volume). The whole disk has been formatted to one FAT32 volume. The GUID partition table has not been replaced by an MBR. The disk still has an MBR (instead of a PMBR) though. ...


6

Absolutely! I plan for the worse! As a first level of defence I'm running Time Machine against all my important files. Photos and videos. Things I wouldn't want to lose. This gives me some "stupidity insurance" -- if I delete something accidentally, hopefully I can get it back from a Time Machine snapshot. I also push all my data out to the cloud. I'm a ...


6

While I never tried it myself, in theory you could use something like PhoneDisk to open the app's private folder and copy all the content to your computer. Then, after deleting and reinstalling the app, you should be able to copy the content back.


6

You might try using Target Disk Mode - hold down T at startup and then connect the MacBook Pro to another Mac (or a PC that can read Mac drives) via FireWire or Thunderbolt. Or try holding down the Shift key to boot into Safe Boot mode. If neither of those work, try booting from your MacBook Pro's system restore DVD, use Disk Utility and try repairing the ...


6

Yes - programs like PhoneView can often read files from a device that iTunes insists must be restored. The iTunes function is to sync and clearly the OS is now in a state where it can't run itself or be updated, so the "correct" thing for iTunes is to ask for a restore. I wouldn't say that you are guaranteed to get the photos back, but it's good you have ...


6

I successfully used TestDisk to get photos back from an SD card.


6

Have a technician (not an apple one) carefully open up the iPhone (hopefully you dont have a warranty). Remove the SIM card and battery. Then lay the halves flat and then use a vacuum cleaner with a long nozzle to dry out the moisture. Make sure its on low and that its not close to the phone. If too close it will short circuit the phone, making the ...


5

Xcode can reinstall an app. Go to Window -> Devices and click on your device on the left. You can tap the '+' button and browse for an app, or just drag any app you want onto the 'Installed apps' section. You can even drag an app icon straight from iTunes. The app will be reinstalled, over the old one, without erasing any data, documents, caches, etc.


5

There is little hope unless one or both of the editors squirrel away copies of the file for you or embed the undo buffer in the document. It really depends on the editors and the settings. One last ditch effort is to use the mdfind command. If that file had a memorable string or misspelling you could see in an instant if any files on the disk contain that ...


5

I like using rsync in order to copy files from a corrupted source to a functional destination: rsync -auv --delete --ignore-errors /path/to/source/ /path/to/destination/ Where: -a = "archive mode" = recurses into directories, copies symlinks as symlinks, preserves permissions, times, groups and special files, also preserves owner (when owner = root) and ...


5

SSDs don't come in an 80GB size (that I've seen -- usually multiples of 32GB). It may be possible depending on why the drive dies. If its a mechanical failure, then you could take the drive to a specialty computer repair shop (try local before the big stores), and they should be able to help you with diagnosing the actual issue. Since the data is stored ...


5

If you are comfortable using the command line, you could use dd to copy your drive byte-for-byte. First, you need to find the BSD identifier for your internal drive. If you are booted from the drive, this will be disk0. Otherwise, it is most likely disk1, but you should run the following command to see all of your disks and the partitions they contain. ...


5

You could try following this hint from Macworld. It makes use of the Terminal (0$) to execute the UNIX command dd to copy everything bit-by-bit from your harddrive to another location. 1. Determine UNIX id. of dead drive If you decide to use this method you would first have to determine what the UNIX identifier of the attached disk is. Open up Terminal (...


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