23

You can use xattr. This copies the tags from file1 to file2: xattr -wx com.apple.metadata:_kMDItemUserTags "$(xattr -px com.apple.metadata:_kMDItemUserTags file1)" file2;xattr -wx com.apple.FinderInfo "$(xattr -px com.apple.FinderInfo file1)" file2 The tags are stored in a property list as a single array of strings: $ xattr -p com.apple.metadata:...


15

In a nutshell, how would one access this feature in Finder – not Spotlight (Command+Space) – but the adding of tags themselves? From Finder, highlight a file and hit Cmd-I (or right click and select Get Info) to bring up the File Info Dialog for the file. In this dialog, the Spotlight Comments field is where you add tag data. Just add text to this field to "...


12

Experts recommend that you should set up the minimal hierarchical folder structure that is logical for you, and use tags for all other categories. For example, Kerry Gleeson's classic book The Personal Efficiency Program (1994, 4th edition 2009) recommends the following three folders: 1. Working, 2. Reference, 3. Archives. "Working" would contain files ...


10

I have the same problem, and so do others: just search the Apple support discussions. The only solutions currently are: Reinstall OS X 10.8 Install PathFinder, a third party patch that brings back labels If PF is too pricey, try asking binaryage (makers of TotalFinder) to also enable this feature, as TotalFinder is only $18, compared to Pathfinder at nearly ...


8

You can't. The seven colours are unchangeable, because this is needed to provide backwards compatibility with earlier versions of OS X (where they were called labels, you could only have one, and you couldn't change the colour). If you want a detailed explanation of why tags were implemented this way, and why that restricts the tag colours to the default, ...


7

Ok, I should have taken a look at SuperUser, here's a way to do what AllInOne says without fiddling with XML files (and it's faster). Simply create a new smart folder or hit cmd+F, choose "Raw Query" from the filters and type kMDItemUserTags != '*' in the field.


7

Tags are not 100% portable in that they don't always survive mailing or copying to other computers such as Linux or Windows. On that respect, it's more about those OS supporting the Apple filesystem. I am impressed that even copying tagged files to a SMB formatted USB drive preserves the tag metadata and most copy operations from and to another Mac via an ...


7

You can use Homebrew's tag: brew install tag tag -r /path/* You can combine this with a find command to find specific files/folders + recursive. find . -exec tag -r {} \; -print


7

No script is needed to accomplish that. Simply use mdfind 'kMDItemUserTags=<tag>'to find all items with the tag <tag>. In your case that's mdfind 'kMDItemUserTags=Music'. If you want to restrict the search to a special directory use: mdfind 'kMDItemUserTags=Music' -onlyin /path/to/folder e.g. mdfind 'kMDItemUserTags=Music' -onlyin ~/Music/...


6

Good news for all that miss the color-backgrounds from 10.8 and below. The free Extension "XtraFinder" has a new Option in Version 0.19 called "Leagacy Color Label Painting" (in "Appearance") which brings back the color background for the finder in listmode.


6

It's possible to manipulate tags via pure bash commands. There's no need for a 3rd party "tag" util. This command lists all tags of a file ($src): xattr -px com.apple.metadata:_kMDItemUserTags "$src" | \ xxd -r -p - - | plutil -convert json -o - - | sed 's/[][]//g' | tr ',' '\n' And here is how you can add a tag ($newtag) to a file ($src): xattr -wx ...


6

You can also use tag: tag -tgf \*|grep '^ '|cut -c5-|sort -u tag -f \* finds all files with tags, -t includes tag names in the output, and -g prints each tag on a separate line.


6

Thanks for clarifying the question about the location and your OS. In your case, the grey dot is a progress indicator for a downloaded file. It used to be a horizontal bar, filling up as the download progresses. Now it's a circle filling up clockwise. Sometimes, the circle does not disappear, like in your case, indicating an incomplete download. IMO, ...


6

Yes there is. If you press the OPTION button while composing the query in the finder window, the "+" button changes into a "..." button, that exposes the interface that allows for testing "All | Any | None" of the subsequent conditions.


5

Turns out, commenting is still there, just hidden a little. Commenting is now a collapsible pane beneath the Name & Extension text field.


5

The tags name are in ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.finder.list. You can read it with defaults read com.apple.finder.plist ViewSettingsDictionary It will need some parsing to be a bit clearer : defaults read com.apple.finder.plist ViewSettingsDictionary | awk 'NR%12==2'| grep -o '".*"' | sed 's/^.\(.*\).\{18\}$/\1/' Other possibility is ...


5

There is a commandline tool called tag: tag is a command line tool to manipulate tags on Mac OS X files (10.9 Mavericks and above), and to query for files with those tags. tag can use the file system's built-in metadata search functionality to rapidly find all files that have been tagged with a given set of tags. Its help page: tag - A tool for ...


5

This is work around, but it works for me, and it travels through all MacOS versions from I guess Mountain Lion (not sure when, made it long time ago). Not sure if it is still relevant, but since I found question without answer in search for the same, decided to contribute. Here what I did: with automator create new service for Mail app, "Get Selected mail ...


4

In fact that was the way labels behaved since System 7 (MacOS 7) I really don't remember if they were present in System 6 though.


3

That list isn't comprehensive. It's only tags added through Finder. There's an additional file ~/Library/SyncedPreferences/com.apple.finder.plist, that also lists the tags that have been manipulated in Finder. If you tagged a file in Terminal or using another tool and never manipulated the tags in Finder, then the tags won't be in either list.


3

A simple way to do this in Finder... At the top of the finder window you see the column headers such as "Name", "Size", "Kind" etc like in the picture below. Just right click on any column header and you can add a column called "tags"as seen here. Then you can sort that column.


3

You can also use mdfind in combination with mdls to get the same result: /usr/bin/mdfind -0 "(kMDItemUserTags == '*')" |xargs -0 mdls -name kMDItemUserTags |grep '^ ' |cut -c5- |cut -d , -f 1 |sort -u Would be interesting to benchmark, which one is faster.


3

6 months or more of this problem... my 2013 Mac was hanging when saving files, making outlook 2011 hang often! and slowing down workflows... and after reading this post it dawned on me... before Mavericks I used 2 different tagging appx, TAGS and Leap. When installing mavericks, tags were quite well, though they became increasingly slow. I I deleted ...


3

You can also use xattr: xattr -dr com.apple.metadata:_kMDItemUserTags ~/folder xattr -dr com.apple.FinderInfo ~/folder If you don't delete the com.apple.FinderInfo extended attributes, Finder keeps showing the color labels for tags with colors. If you don't want to keep any extended attributes, you can just run xattr -cr ~/folder. You can use find -...


3

Go to Finder → Preferences → Tags. You can rename/delete tags by right-clicking and modify the coloured tags with the control at the bottom.


3

macOS Sierra comes with SIP (System Integrity Protection) which protects all important files from getting removed. So an additional tagging is not really necessary. In finding disk space hogs some of the answers to How can I figure out what's slowly eating my HD space? might be helpful.


3

I've had the same issue. The dot appeared when I edited the original download (eps) file in Illustrator, I've deleted the background. I guess it was somehow linked with the browser and had noticed a difference between the downloaded file and the currently edited one. The gray dot disappeared when I renamed the file. I hope this helps, and yes, it is very ...


3

If I understood your question correctly, you need to increase the width of the column. You can increase the width of the column by dragging the on the right border of the column:


3

Ironic Software has several Apps which can do that, f.e. 'Yep' and 'Leap'. Take a look at their descriptions, both are Sierra-compatible.


2

Restoring coloured labels are a new feature in TotalFinder: This feature mimics old Finder behaviour. I implemented this option because many people requested back colored labels from Mountain Lion.


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