4

I do not know of a list, per se, however AppleScript supported applications have a dictionary that you can view to see what's available to a given application, besides what available in the StandardAdditions.sdef file of Script Editor itself. While in Script Editor press ⇧⌘L to bring up the Library, where you can double-click on Finder to review what's in ...


3

You can use: tell application "System Events" to keystroke "q" using {control down, command down} You could also use the following instead: tell application "System Events" set appName to (name of every application process whose frontmost is true and visible is true) as string click menu item "Lock Screen" of menu 1 of menu bar item "Apple" of ...


2

The solution is to source the file dependencies you need inside the automator script. Example if you added all of your scripts to ~/.zshrc source ~/.zshrc deploy You can debug things easier by doing which deploy to check to see if that script is accessible.


2

There already is a Screen Lock button for the Touch Bar natively ! Here is how to set up the Screen Lock button on Touch Bar: Go to the Apple menu and choose “System Preferences” and then go to “Keyboard” Under the “Keyboard” tab choose “Customize Control Strip” Expand the Touch Bar and then drag the “Screen Lock” button into the touch bar screen (drag it ...


2

One wouldn't use DiskImageMounter to do this because, despite it giving the illusion that it's scriptable and loaded with commands in its AppleScript dictionary, it never returns a valid reference to any image that it opens; therefore AppleScript never gets informed it's done the job; and DiskImageMounter sacks it off, quits, and invalidates the connection ...


1

All you are doing is returning a list of the last part of the names (if there is more than one delimiter character, the second part) to the next action. Text item delimiters aren't really needed if you are just using the first occurrence of a character, so you can do something like: on run {input, parameters} set output to {} repeat with anItem in ...


1

sudo Being Dangerous There are no dangerous commands, per se. It's what you do with them that can cause problems. For instance, the harmless command yes which will output a string repeatedly until you kill it, can be used nefariously to bring a machine to a crawl: echo "Spawning 1000 yesses" for i in {1..1000} ; do ( /usr/bin/yes & ) ; done ...


1

Sudo is not (in and of itself) dangerous. Sudo merely removes protective restrictions, putting the burden of running safe code on you, rather than protecting you behind the scenes. Sudo can be dangerous when, for instance: You make a coding mistake which has unintended consequences: e.g., if you intend to run: sudo rm -Rf /Users/yourname/something/...


1

The following AppleScript should do the job. It removes only an underscore followed by eight digits, e.g. _2020012, at the end of a filename without changing the extension. I don't know how familiar you are with using AppleScripts but you should be okay if you carefully follow the directions below. Sorry that I can't make its creation simpler but, once ...


1

Solved: I'm not sure why it worked, but running pip3 install pyperclip in the automator window installed it in the correct location for it to be used.


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