30

The accepted answer only works when the NFS server allows connections on non-reserved ports (i.e. >1024). The exports man pages say it: exportfs understands the following export options: secure This option requires that requests originate on an Internet port less than IPPORT_RESERVED (1024). This option is on by default. To turn it off, specify ...


23

I use binchunker to convert .bin/.cue files to a single .iso file on my Mac. You can obtain binchunker via Homebrew or Macports. Here's some more info from the manpage: bchunk - CD image format conversion from bin/cue to iso/cdr SYNOPSIS bchunk [-v] [-p] [-r] [-w] [-s] <image.bin> <image.cue> <basename> DESCRIPTION bchunk ...


15

In Finder, press cmd + k and enter the path to the NFS server/share: For me this mounted as /Volumes/users-1 (but I already had /Volumes/Users mounted). iMac21:~ user$ df -h /Volumes/users-1 Filesystem Size Used Avail Capacity iused ifree %iused Mounted on 192.168.7.5:/nas/users 5.4Ti 4.8Ti 292Gi 95% 261121 366027775 0% /...


10

To prevent a volume from automatically mounting you need to know the filesystem type and either the volume name or volume UUID. This information can be found by using the Terminal application command diskutil info name, where name is the volume name. For example, volume names can be found under Devices in the sidebar of a Finder application window. On my ...


7

EDIT 2: Unfortunately after upgrading to Big Sur, this no longer is sufficient. You also have to edit /etc/fstab and add: UUID=[put UUID of volume here] none auto noauto EDIT: After more testing, it appears the ONLY change needed is to add the "D" for Data flag to the APFS volume. /etc/fstab changes are not needed. I've changed the text below to ...


5

A little late, but hopefully this helps anyone else searching (since the rest of the answers here are useless!) Quoting https://discussions.apple.com/message/29744735#29744735 - Since at least Panther and through to El Capitan, AutomountDisksWithoutUserLogin needs to be set to true (1) in /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/autodiskmount.plist, then ...


5

afaik, fstab doesn't exist by default. You have to create one, first time. From your linked instructions... 7) Edit (or create) an fstab file by typing the following and pressing enter: sudo vifs Will do precisely that, edit - or create - an fstab file. Once you've got it set up, it ought to work as expected. I have mine set with ACLs so it will ...


4

I'm running into the same problem than @ndejay but the cause may differ sightly. I'm using NFSv3 and my Autofs maps were working on OS X 10.5 to 10.8 : /mnt -fstype=nfs,nfsvers=3,proto=tcp,resvport myserver:/share On Mavericks it works only from the command line : mount -t nfs -o nfsvers=3,proto=tcp,resvport myserver:/share /mnt With a little debugging ...


4

If you try default /etc/auto_master file, you can see line /net -hosts -nobrowse,hidefromfinder,nosuid Then you can cd /net/host/exported/path and found that mac tries to mount this exported path.


4

Tetsujin and user3439894's comments and observations prompted some testing. Turns out, there is more than one UUID when you look at drives and partitions and the 'diskutil list' command doesn't report the UUID that needs to be used in the vifs/fstab commands. root %> diskutil info disk1 | grep -e UUID Shows that there are Volume, Disk / Partition, ...


3

OK, I figured it out. The keys in the auto_afp file are paths that are relative to the path specified in the top-level auto_master file. So if your /etc/auto_master has: my/global/mount auto_afp Then your /etc/auto_afp should have: point -fstype=.... Finally to get visibility into what automountd is doing, add AUTOMOUNTD_TRACE=2 to /etc/autofs.conf, ...


3

FWIW, if anyone else stumbles across this old question, the best guide I have found for mounting sshfs using apple's automounter is here - http://virtuallyhyper.com/2013/07/mount-various-file-system-with-autofs-on-mac-os-x-mountain-lion/#mount-sshfs-with-autofs


3

For macOS Mojave and latest version of osxfuse, this is the correct daemon file: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd"> <plist version="1.0"> <dict> <key>Disabled</key> <false/> <key>Label</key&...


3

This doesn't require disabling System Integrity Protection, as cron jobs are still working in el captain: $ crontab -e */5 * * * * /usr/local/bin/sshfs 192.168.1.2:/etc /Users/xxx/temp/etc -o uid=$(id -u) -o gid=$(id -g) -o reconnect


3

I found that the automountd service wasn't loaded on my machine (running 10.10 Yosemite). $ sudo launchctl list | grep -i auto 84878 0 com.apple.autofsd - 0 com.apple.preferences.timezone.auto - 0 com.apple.automountd Restarting autofsd and automountd and then rerunning automount -vc has made it work. sudo launchctl unload /System/Library/...


3

It sounds like you might have dragged it out of the Sidebar on your Finder Window. Try this: plug the drive back in, and then hit Cmd ⌘ Shift ⇧ C to go to your Computer view. You should see all your connected drives there; just drag the drive you want back to the Sidebar.


3

These are all great (and correct) answers! I thought I'd share a small script/utility that I use to make this easier. I've got this no_automount file executable in my ~/bin/ directory. (Don't forget to chmod +x it!) https://gist.github.com/voltechs/fc48c9683d50c7c03cab2f0a6477d8da #!/usr/bin/env ruby # Usage: no_automount /Volumes/My\ Disk diskinfo = `...


3

Updated for macOS Mojave and macOS Catalina etc. macOS Mojave 10.14 and later are more strict about editing system files. Editing /etc/fstab is strongly discouraged. They now what you to use vifs. I have aggregated the info from other answers and created a bash oneliner that you can run and it will give you a list of UUID…noauto lines that you could add ...


3

Number one, something might be wrong with your VPN, because everything should work as if you were physically in the office. You might want to check that. Number two, I assume the remote machines use the wrong IP address when connecting to the servers. And if they are actually successful with some of the tricks you mentioned, you might have a few security ...


2

I've been using a commercial product called NFS Manager to handle my automounts, and it's been working great. It has a trial mode, so you can see if it works for you and is worth the money. I have no affiliation with the product.


2

Using autofs, as suggested by others is probably the way to go. Most of what follows works in El Capitan, which made auto mounting more difficult, but it should apply to Mavericks too. I do not have a Mavericks system to test. In order to make this work edit /etc/auto_master and add the following line: /- auto_nfs -nobrowse,nosuid Then create ...


2

I finally found something that worked, and I have verified it does as well. Please see the link: http://www.dbsysnet.com/how-to-mount-ext2ext3-linux-volumes-in-mac-os-x-snow-leopard-with-readwrite-access/ Basically there is a mount option that can be added "rw+" to the file: /System/Library/Filesystems/fuse-ext2.fs/fuse-ext2.util under the Macro() ...


2

Update 2016-08-03: I found that installing SSHFS from https://osxfuse.github.io is stabler than the homebrew version, because of some old dependency (therefore this may improve in the future). CAVEAT: This connection is super fast when it works, but often has issues after terminated connects due e.g. wireless, standby. Assumes you have Homebrew installed (...


2

Please create a folder Share in the User folder and change your auto_master to /etc/auto_master # # Automounter master map # +auto_master # Use directory service /Users/User/Share auto_nas /net -hosts -nobrowse,hidefromfinder,nosuid /home auto_home -...


2

autofs and automount Consider using autofs directly to handle the lazy mounting and unmounting of network drives. The automount manual page explains more. Apple published Autofs: Automatically Mounting Network File Shares in Mac OS X to help administrators set autofs up. autofs has the benefit of being silent to the user and connects on-demand, instead of ...


2

You can use a cronJob and an apple Script unMount a disk with AppleScript : set mountedDiskName to "AirPort Time Capsule" set diskIsMounted to false tell application "System Events" to set diskNames to name of every disk if mountedDiskName is in diskNames then set diskIsMounted to true end if if diskIsMounted then // put a sleep or a ...


2

It appears that the syntax must use single spaces, not tabs, to be recognised by the system. This would fall in line with many command line processes; the only exception that springs to mind is the hosts file, which can use any amount of whitespace. That would make the correct syntax UUID=uuid_of_partition2 none hfs rw,noauto rather than UUID=...


2

To answer the question, no Finder does not offer that preference or option, however there is a workaround. I have a similar situation and I use an AppleScript script saved as an application that mounts the unmounted target volume when I want, without having to go into Disk Utility to do it. I have this app on the Toolbar in Finder, with the same icon as ...


2

I had this problem on Mojave and it seems nothing solves the combination of APFS and automatic mounting of volumes. However, if you have an encrypted volume, it is possible to disable the prompting for the volume password which keeps the volume from being mounted. The part that does the prompting for the password is the file bundle: /System/Library/...


2

If Google lead you here because sudo vifs returns vifs: editing error this solved it for me: The source for vifs shows the error in the section /* obtain and invoke the editor */. I have my $EDITOR set to use TextMate. Apparently, that doesn't work. Solution: EDITOR=nano sudo vifs


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