28

TextMate 2 uses a special file called .tm_properties to control lots of settings in the app. It will use ~/.tm_properties if present for global defaults. You can also add one inside a source tree to control settings for a particular project. The setting you're looking for is: softTabs = true Just add that line to ~/.tm_properties (or create it if it doesn'...


20

You can press ⌘+A to select all then Text->Indent Selection.


18

As of this writing, the beginning steps are: Go to Bundles (menu) > Edit Bundles… Press ⌘N to create a new bundle. The bundle gets saved in ~/Library/Application\ Support/Avian/Bundles; you may wish to right-click on the saved bundle and choose Show Package Contents to see what's inside your bundle. Further info can be found e.g. here and here.


15

Put the following in ~/.tm_properties: softWrap = true tabSize = 4 softTabs = true


12

For Textmate there is a command line tool, mate, that can be installed. Once installed you just use mate <file> to open that file in text mate. For application that don't have a command line tool, you can use the open command with the -a flag and the name of the application. i.e. open -a iTunes This also works for TextMate: open -a "TextMate 2" ...


8

Option 1: use TextMate 1: open ~/Library/Application\ Support/Avian/Bundles/Themes.tmbundle/Themes/Custom.tmTheme -a TextMate cp ~/Library/Application\ Support/TextMate/Themes/Custom.tmTheme \ ~/Library/Application\ Support/Avian/Bundles/Themes.tmbundle/Themes/Custom.tmTheme Option 2: edit the theme as an old-style plist from the bundle editor: Option 3: ...


6

"Avian" was the project's 'code' or 'working' name so the developers chose that string over the other choices.


6

Go with what you're familiar with and don't worry about whether you're missing something or not. Familiarity will trump any additional features you might likely discover in TextMate and the ability to sit in a familiar coding environment no matter what OS you're working is a really big productivity boost. Overall Sublime Text 2 is a move forward from ...


5

Theme tweaking of the type you could do in TextMate 1 is not yet featured in TextMate 2 itself. HOWEVER... I just came across this very cool online TextMate theme editor. Its interface imitates the Fonts & Colors tab in the TM1 preferences. It apparently only works in Chrome, but I use Chrome anyway so I'm off to play with it.


4

You could cp /Applications/TextMate.app/Contents/Resources/KeyBindings.dict ~/Libary/Application\ Support/TextMate/ and add: "\t" = shiftRight:; "$\t" = shiftLeft:; That would prevent expanding snippets with tab though.


4

As mentioned in the troubleshooting section you can achieve this by entering the following into your Terminal.app: defaults write com.macromates.textmate NSQuitAlwaysKeepsWindows -bool NO


4

In the bundle editor window, choose File › New (or Cmd + N) and you'll get a sheet like this: Just choose 'Snippet' from that drop down.


4

You can run rm -r /Applications/TextMate.app/Contents/Library/QuickLook/TextMateQL.qlgenerator but you'll have to do that again every time TextMate is updated.


3

For TextMate 2 you can do the following. In a Terminal window run: defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview disableAntiAlias -bool YES To disable it, run: defaults write com.macromates.TextMate.preview disableAntiAlias -bool NO


3

The file was located in: ~/Library/Application Support/TextMate/Session/ This is for the OpenSource version of TextMate 2.0-alpha-9487, on osx Mountain Lion 1.8.5


3

fn+▲ and fn+▼ are Universal page up/down on OSX with abridged keyboards. fn+◀ and fn+▶ are home and end respectively.


3

What you are seeing are QuickLook preview thumbnails: if you look closely at your screenshot, you will notice each “icon” shows the start of the file’s content. You are correct this is due to you installing TextMate 2, which provides a powerful QuickLook extension for source code files (try selecting one of the files in Finder and hitting space). The ...


3

I've managed to get pretty far on my own, so I'm posting an answer. If someone else has a better way, I'll be glad to accept their answer. I ran into some gotchas along the way, so I wanted to share those as well. Here are the steps I took. Make sure TextMate is not running on your new Mac. On your old Mac, tar up the TextMate and Avian folders under ~/...


3

When I need to paste a lot of text into a Terminal application window, I use the cat command to transfer the text to a file. For example, I would enter the command below before pasting the text with the ⌘+V key combination. cat >myfile.txt When finished pasting text, enter the control+D key combination. This will terminate the cat command. Note: The ...


2

Currently using: TextMate version 2.0-alpha.9547 Was trying to define it myself when I found out it is already defined as: Ctrl + f


2

FYI, it doesn't seem to be mentioned in the Mac shortcuts list, but on my Macbook Air you can press Ctrl+option+f and Ctrl+option+b to move forward and backward one word, respectively.


2

That's probably because the PDF uses actual curly quotation marks (which are indeed syntactically incorrect). The most straightforward thing to do would be performing a search and replace on the copied text in your text-editor.


2

No need to use /Applications or ~/Applications, you can put text mate 2 in any folder you wish. For example if you have Textmate in /Applications/Textmate.app, create a folder in /Applications/TM2/Textmate2.app


2

While TextMate doesn't have built-in FTP or SSH capabilities there are a few bundles for it that have tried to remedy this shortcoming. In particular the FTP/SSH Bundle aims to provide what you seek: a way to define a "project" that can be synchronized (both up and down) with a remote file system. The bundle is a touch dangerous if you're using FTP as it ...


2

I think that's a bug with Finder. Services that receive folders as input don't seem to be listed in the Services menu when folders are selected (but it only applies to column view; they are listed in other view modes). In any case, one alternative would be to just use an AppleScript without wrapping it as a service. You can give it an app-specific shortcut ...


2

If you're using multiple platforms, then I'd suggest going with Sublime Text 2. Sure, some things just don't act natively on the Mac, but as Ian said, nothing beats familiarity. Personally I've been (and still am) a huge fan of ST2. But recently I've switched over to a new application that is written in native Cocoa. It's called Chocolat. I've watched it ...


2

As far as I know, normal OS X text views don't support anything like that. In TextMate 1 you can use ⌥⌘O (Edit > Mode > Overwrite Mode). In Word 2011 for Mac you can go to View > Toolbars > Customize Toolbars & Menus and drag Commands > All Commands > Overtype to a menu.


2

You need to tell your Latex editor where the main file of your dissertation is placed, in regard to the document you are editing. To define it, add this command to the header of the .tex file that you are editing: %!TEX root = ../Main.tex Just edit the path to your main file (in this example "../Main.tex") from the file you are editing. I usually have a ...


2

One solution, as detailed here, would be to use a hardlink for the directory. It's very important that you understand the implications listed in Bob's answer as well as only use the hunlink utility (also in Bob's answer) to remove any directories created via the hlink utility. I certainly would not recommend this solution for anyone who isn't comfortable ...


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