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68

You can use OptionShift⌘-V to paste and match the current style. This removes all previous formatting, links, etc. If you would like to make this the default action when pressing ⌘V, open System Preferences -> Keyboard -> Keyboard Shortcuts, and select Application Shortcuts from the list on the left. Then, hit + to make a new shortcut, select ...


28

iconv is definitively the tool of choice here: iconv -f MACROMAN -t UTF-8 your-roman-encoded-file.txt > utf-8-encoded-file.txt Run iconv --list to see a list of all supported encodings.


22

QLStephen is a more general solution that works for all kinds of text files.


16

Open the Terminal application Type or paste defaults write -g CGFontRenderingFontSmoothingDisabled -bool NO Press ↩︎ (Enter) Restart the computer To return it back, do the same but instead type in the terminal defaults delete -g CGFontRenderingFontSmoothingDisabled Update on 2019.10.12: the solution works in macOS 10.15 too.


15

You can click on the magnifying glass icon and choose Insert Pattern or press ⌃ CTRL+⌥ ALT+⌘ CMD+P Then pick Line Break


15

In systems up to 10.11.6 you can save the "Purchased" page as html file to disk: Quit App Store.app Open Terminal.app in /Applications/Utilities Enter defaults write com.apple.appstore ShowDebugMenu -bool true and hit the Return/⏎ key to show the debug menu in App Store.app. Open App Store.app (check that the "Debug" menu is available!) If you have some ...


15

Yes, you certainly can! Just start typing your word and press F5 to reveal up to 20 possible words. To use your example, below is a screenshot showing how this works when I type envir and press the F5 key: You can then use the arrow keys (or mouse) to select the word you want (or just hit enter to accept the first word). And, because this only appears when ...


13

As far as I know there's no preference to enable this, it's just a built-in feature with no on/off switch. My best advice is to make sure that you hold down the mouse before starting to drag the text. There's some delay built in such that if you try to drag too quickly, you'll just end up selecting more text. The process that works for me is: Select the ...


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The Lion build of less indeed comes with the lesskey feature disabled, as can be seen by the customized defines.h it is being built with (line #define USERFILE 0). This doesn't mean it's broken, just that someone decided to customize the build and disable this feature for whatever reason. Sadly they neglected to update the man page, which is why it's still ...


11

Safari Highlight URL in the address bar Press ⌥ and then ↩ to download. Chrome File -> Save As No options appear as to what the downloaded format is. For a plain .txt file it will be a simple text file.


11

The Speech Synthesis Programming Guide describes the embedded speech commands that you can use to adjust how the speech synthesis engines process your input text. The [[inpt PHON]] command enables the use of phonemes and phoneme modifiers. For example, the following text includes a phonemic version of your chosen word (select the text, Control-click, and ...


11

Text messages from your Mac are actually sent through your iPhone. On your iPhone go to the Settings app → Messages → Text Message Forwarding. You may need to re-do the setup by removing and re-adding your Mac in there.


11

If you have a Touch Bar, you can enable ‘Touch Bar typing suggestions’. This shows the same 3 options you're used to on iOS on the Touch Bar as you type. This will also show emoji suggestions like iOS. Enable it from System Preferences → Keyboard → Text → Touch Bar typing suggestions.


10

iMessage can also register email address (like your Apple ID), that's how it works on iPad and iPod Touch. So it's completely normal to be able to send iMessages with an SIM-free iPhone. As long as you are connected to a WiFi network.


10

iWork '09 apps don't seem to have an Edit > Substitutions menu, but in ones that do you can set up a custom shortcut for toggling the Smart Quotes item:


10

Both Klanomath and PeterVP provide suitable answers. If all you want is a list of the apps, I'd refer you to those. However, if you'd like other details included (such as Version etc) or you just don't like using Terminal, you can achieve what you want with these steps: Go to Apple > About This Mac Click on the System Report... button on the window that ...


10

Globbing isn't random, it's guaranteed to be alphabetical (a.k.a. lexicographic order according to your locale), which is different from numeric sorting order. You can use brace expansion for this. Replace '10' with the number of the last file. cat {1..10}.txt > merged.txt This uses bash brace expansion, which you can read about at LESS='+/Brace ...


9

You can do this in System Preferences in the Text tab of the Language & Text pane: You can toggle on/off the built-in replacements, as well as create ones of your own.


8

Format → Wrap to Page or Shift+⌘+W


8

Another way to convert non-ASCII characters to ASCII variants is to use iconv -t ASCII//TRANSLIT: $ echo ‘’“”–—…äé | iconv -t ASCII//TRANSLIT ''""--..."a'e ASCII//IGNORE would remove non-ASCII characters, but you can also do that with for example tr -dc '\0-\177'.


8

You can use Unicode combining character U+0305 COMBINING OVERLINE. It can be found by searching in the palette from Edit → Emoji & Symbols (formerly Edit → Special Characters…), or by using a specialized keyboard layout such as the built-in Unicode Hex Input or my own custom one mostly designed for mathematics. Here's some sample text with overlines, ...


8

People can develop plugins to allow Quick Look to support more file types. You can find Apple's Quick Look documentation here. Luckily though Timac (aka Alexandre Colucci) has already created one. You can find Timac's Quick Look plugin for strings files here. Just download the compiled plugin, copy it to your /Library/QuickLook folder and run the qlmanage -...


8

A simple trick is to just copy the rest of a line and paste it into the "replace" field. Works with Textedit, Xcode etc.


8

This answer has been updated to reflect rubik's sphere's misunderstanding between what Rich Text is (what was originally asked about) and what's actually being worked with from Google Chrome, being HTML. (See comments moved to chat.) I'm leaving the original answer as is, and below this new content, as it does technically answer the original question as ...


8

I use a shell script, in Terminal enter: find /Applications -path '*Contents/_MASReceipt/receipt' -maxdepth 4 -print |\sed 's#.app/Contents/_MASReceipt/receipt#.app#g; s#/Applications/##' This will list all applications you bought on the Mac App Store. If you redirect the result to a text file like so: find /Applications -path '*Contents/_MASReceipt/...


7

You can use QuicklookStephen (https://github.com/whomwah/qlstephen). Install via Brew: brew cask install qlstephen and then reset the Quicklook plugins: qlmanage -r and you should be good to go! Tested with both files without extension and files with "unknown" extension (e.g. .nfo)


7

You could use launchd. launchd lets you manage daemons and agents according to certain conditions. What are daemons and agents? From man launchd: A "daemon" is, by definition, a system-wide service of which there is one instance for all clients. An "agent" is a service that runs on a per-user basis. Daemons should not attempt to display UI or ...


7

I suggest that you try the “Paste and match style” menu command, right below “Paste” - the corresponding shortcut is ⇧–⌥–⌘-V. It will paste the content, but strip all the associated formatting.


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