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The biggest consideration is the software you run, not just in terms of compatibility with macOS generally, but also in terms of identifying if they're 32-bit or 64-bit apps (which will be a crucial consideration moving forward if macOS Catalina interests you, since it will be compatible with your MacBook Pro hardware). As a starting point you can use the ...


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Well baring the obvious and replacing the bad battery you will probably have to install the OS on a different computer and reinstall the hard drive. The Mac power module is not responding that the laptop is connected to AC but responding that the battery is bad. Apple will replace the battery for $199 so keep that in mind while doing any work around. You ...


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I'm a big believer in having more RAM generally, but of course in many situations having more RAM isn't warranted. In your case, however, having more RAM is going to be useful because of the type of tasks you're using your iMac for. The key spec missing from your question, however, is the type of storage you have. If your iMac has one of the Fusion drives, ...


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You don’t have to do any pre testing if you get an external USB drive and install any new OS you choose. As long as it’s newer than the one you run, you can then boot to the external, run migration assistant to copy over your apps and data and run any tests you like. If it is faster, do the upgrade on your main disk and repeat. If not, you can spend ...


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I have finally gotten around this without battery replacement (will do another time, not an option right now): Use Disk Utility to create a second partition Make the second partition a bootable installer follow these instructions http://osxdaily.com/2018/09/29/download-full-macos-mojave-installer/ to download a full installer run a command similar to this ...


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How to upgrade to macOS Sierra - Apple Support will lead you to the Mac App Store link for Sierra. You might want to bookmark this too: Download Older Versions of macOS and Mac OS X - krypted


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The problem in upgrading is largely one of compatibility with your existing application software. If you are running software designed for Lion (released in 2010), then jumping up to El Capitan (2015) or later may cause problems, as the software you've installed may be expecting things that aren't there or don't work in the same way. Make sure your apps and ...


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What should I look out for before I upgrade, and should I consider not upgrading to the newest version of macOS so I can keep certain applications running the same? Use the following reasoning to answer the above questions. At the simplest level, this is what you need to take care of: Prepare a list of all the 3rd party apps that you use. Make sure that it ...


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