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According to Apple's documentation: APFS or APFS Encrypted disks are the preferred format for a Time Machine backup disk. If you select a new backup disk that’s not already formatted as an APFS disk, you get the option to erase and reformat it. If the disk is a Mac OS Extended format disk that contains an existing Time Machine backup, you aren’t asked to ...


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TL;DR You can do this: Create an APFS Time Machine volume as normal. In Disk Utility, add one or more AFPS volumes to the same container that includes the Time Machine volume, and set a Reserve Size for each (see below for step-by-step instructions). This will effectively limit the size of the Time Machine volume even though it doesn't itself have an ...


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This was hinted at in some other comments, but .sparsebundles can be mounted like a normal .dmg file, allowing you to browse the backups the way you used to. (Works on my macOS Catalina system.)


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Time Machine should offer you a choice to inherit the existing backup or create a new one. If it doesn't do that, try the following Go to System Preferences > Time machine Unlock by clicking on the lock Click Options... Remove the existing backup volume Now add the backup volume again Time Machine should now ask you if you want to inherit the existing ...


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While you probably could remove timeslices manually (and let the OS handle hardlinks), it may not be wise to tamper with the way Time Machine handles the backup history. If you mess up (even by accident), you may end up with no useable backup at all. What might be easier to do is to take full-image snapshots with tools like SuperDuper or Carbon Copy Cloner ...


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Hopefully, my problem is the same, thus my experience may be additive to this. Mac Mini 2018 fell over, reformated, reinstalled, couldn't get Time Machine to connect to the time capsule. Manually went through the setup process of macOS, creating my account, and such. Opened Finder, opened Network, opened the Time Capsule, password OK, opened Backup folder, ...


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I'm not sure how you migrated; in normal circumstances if you use Migration Assistant when you first fire up the new Mac, it can proceed with the existing Time Machine backups. There are indeed steps to inherit a time machine backup, but they are hairy, and I often end up starting backups from scratch. This issue was covered here: How can I use an existing ...


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I observe the same with 11.6.2 and I have the suspicion that from time to time the backup device cannot be mounted because of all this rubbish which seems to act like broken mount points. Somewhere I read that fdisk sees these as uncleanly unmounted drives and thus prevents a new mount of the backup drive. So far only reboot helps.


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Get a big spare drive & make a bootable clone. You cannot guarantee Time Machine will let you revert. See Revert to El Capitan


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Yes and no There is not a feature/function in macOS that will roll back patches (updates if you prefer) like can be done in Windows. But a Time Machine backup can indeed in assist you in rolling back to a previous update or upgrade. Make sure you have a current backup of the system you want to upgrade. I would also make a USB installer of your current macOS ...


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macOS 12.1, custom SMB port I was getting the same "Authentication error (80) - the correct user or password info may not exist in the System.keychain or the server may no longer allow access for this user." It was a keychain issue. After adding the location, I looked in Keychain Access and the Time machine location, at 'where' it was saved as smb:/...


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I don't have a categorical plan of action to manage this strategically from soup to nuts, but based on once when I accidentally migrated the same user onto an already fresh install, here are some ideas. First. Ensure you have solid backups of both, in case things get out of hand. Migrating onto an already set-up Mac will generate two separate accounts, even ...


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N.B. the tmutil manpage is sorely in need of an update since the changes starting with macOS 11 Big Sur. Cf. @Tetsujin 's post to delete an APFS timemachine backup snapshot, this works in macOS 12.1 monterey: # sw_vers # print macOS version information ProductName: macOS ProductVersion: 12.1 BuildVersion: 21C52 for APFS ...


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Time Machine generally does not backup system logs or generally any temporal-based information. Generally, knowledgedc.db is a iOS SQLite db that effectively is a logfile on iOS. (I suspect this might be used on Monterey to support UIKit/iOS apps, but can not confirm). Therefore it is likely being excluded by Time Machine. You can confirm this on your ...


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You can extract a snapshot from a Time Machine backup to an external hard drive vai tmutil: sudo tmutil restore /Volumes/TMdrive/Backups.backupdb/machinename/2021-11-30-042315/MyHD /Volumes/Safety-HD (where Safety-HD is the harddrive with the full machine volume and TMdrive is the Time Machine backup drive). Two caveats: On the resulting hard drive the ...


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First find a machine running an earlier version of Mac OS prior to Big Sur. Format your SSD for HFS+ (Mac OS Extended etc).... Create time machine backup of this earlier OS. Then take the same drive to your Big Sur or later machine, and use the same drive to backup. This time, Time Machine will not wipe / format your drive as APFS because it will detect that ...


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Exact same thing happened to my backup disk, exact same message from Disk Utility. Erasing and reformatting in APFS would generate the same error. Erased and reformatted in FAT then reformatted back to APFS and the First Aid error went away. If, following the first Time Machine backup, it doesn't appear in Finder, restart the computer in Safe Mode and ...


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Even though the credentials were valid, I had configured my server to force all users to reset their passwords after logging in for the first time. So the error message really means: please login to the server interface with your credentials, change your password then come back to Time Machine.


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Try this basic smb.conf instead. [global] ea support = yes mdns name = mdns security = user min protocol = SMB2 vfs objects = fruit streams_xattr fruit:metadata = stream fruit:model = MacSamba fruit:posix_rename = yes fruit:veto_appledouble = no fruit:wipe_intentionally_left_blank_rfork = yes fruit:delete_empty_adfiles = yes fruit:time machine = yes aio ...


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Working backwards in your questions: You should not attempt to create a .DS_Store file. macOS will create one when needed to hold (as you know) metadata about the folder. Attempts to create and/or modify .DS_Store either don't work (a good outcome) or cause no end of issues. Regarding your apparent lack of .DS_Store: Monterey's Finder does not show ....


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Note: This is an old question, but I think it's a good one and therefore deserves a proper answer. The password must be stored in the keychain of the Mac that uses it to make backups (otherwise that couldn't work). You can find the password by searching your keychain for sparsebundle (or sometimes backupbundle). You should be able to find them in the system ...


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I had the same issue happen to me, and in my case, this turned out to be the cause: I had stored the password in a password manager, and for some reason, a special character had slipped into it. However, this character was not visible in the password manager, neither was it in the keychain! I have no idea when and how that character had slipped into the ...


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+1 to what everyone is telling you about backups and failures in general. To address your question more directly, though: It is ALWAYS possible for an upgrade to brick your machine. The way this happens is during the firmware update sequence. A botched sequence and/or a buggy firmware image, either EFI or SMC, will render your machine instantly unbootable, ...


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