29

The Apple mini-DisplayPort to VGA or HDMI adapter terminates the Thunderbolt chain where it is connected, so until Apple released new MacBook Pro with two Thunderbolt ports (similar to the iMac that has two ports) then you will only get one video signal from the device through the Thunderbolt port. You may find an inexpensive USB to VGA solution to get ...


21

In Windows, you can typically choose a different output-source using this approach: For switching outputs, try this: Right click on the speaker icon in the tray. Choose "playback devices". Select from the list of playback devices (speakers, hdmi, usb headset,) (the device you want) Choose "Set Default" Your audio output will instantly switch ...


18

I'd recommend buying this book: http://www.amazon.com/Life-Times-Thunderbolt-Kid-Memoir/dp/0767919378/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1330596630&sr=8-7 It's exactly 1" thick, put it under the monitor.


18

I discovered that when I plug the USB cable of the keyboard into the short USB extender cable (that came with the keyboard) and then plug the extender cable into the Thunderbolt display, it works for me. Maybe it will work for you too.


16

As has been mentioned, you couldn't daisy-chain multiple Thunderbolt displays on pre-2012 Airs. Two possible add-ons that'll allow you to connect an additional external display: Matrox DualHead2Go (in action hooked up to an 11" Air) DisplayLink adapter I've used the latter and they work pretty well for non-intensive applications.


16

For anyone trying to do this using a dock that has multiple display outputs, the MacBook Pro 2018 only has two thunderbolt busses, but 4 ports (2 ports per bus), as a result, if you try to connect three external monitors, you will need to use different sides of the device. If you try to connect all three monitors into two ports on one side, it won't work.


14

For those seeing this in OS X instead of Windows, there is a separate sound output selection box for "Sound Effects". Make sure to select Headphones.


13

If you want something more elegant than a book under the iMac, you can can add vesa mounts to your iMac and Thunderbolt display and then attach it to a desk or wall mounted adjustable monitor arm. There are many to choose from but here is one pictured below to give you an example. So you could technically mount both or just one to a VESA stand. Note that ...


13

I searched hard to find something that will enable me to use 2 displays from my 2012 MacBook Pro without sacrificing on a USB port (by using an external graphics card) My search ended here. Basically this beauty enables me to plugin into the thunderbolt port (which also take Mini display ports) and connect 2 x 24 inch monitors using HDMI AND also use my ...


10

Your Air supports the internal display as well as only one ThunderBolt external display. As commented below, the Mid 2012 Air can run two ThunderBolt displays. Physically you can daisy chain as many Thunderbolt Displays as you have money, but the first limitation you will run into is the graphics card. The official Apple knowledge base article lists the ...


9

Looks a product was created for this task. Checkout the HiRise by Twelve South as reviewed by MacWorld. Boom iMac and Display = Level. Mac accessory maker Twelve South has introduced the HiRise for iMac, a stand that lets users elevate their desktop Mac monitors to a better viewing level. The $80 device is designed to support all generations of Mac ...


9

The MAC Address is unique and a property of the actual network hardware (although it can be spoofed). So your adapter has its own MAC address, as does the the network interface in a Thunderbolt display, and the Wi-Fi in your MacBook Air. Different Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapters will have different MAC addresses, but moving one between different ports won'...


9

For the display, yes: Target Display Mode. In this mode your iMac can serve as a display for another Mac. This is supported via the Thunderbolt port using a Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (not supported via a Mini DisplayPort cable) source: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5522 For the rest of the devices, theoretically not: 7. When I have a ...


8

As @bmike, @djacobson, and @jaberg have stated in comments, that will not work. There is currently (as of March 2012) no adapter, nor do I expect there to be one to adapt mini-DisplayPort to Thunderbolt. (The standards were defined to be backward-compatible, not forward-compatible.)


8

Thunderbolt contains a DisplayPort channel. You can get a Thunderbolt/Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable. I found a cheap one on Monoprice a while back. Here is a 6 footer.


7

I currently use 3 4k displays (Dell P2715Q) on a MacBook Pro 15" 2017 (GPU: Radeon Pro 560 4096 MB). Two monitors are connected to the right side ports/bus and the third one (plus a dock for charging/USB/etc) are connected to left side ports/bus. The monitors are arranged in a "H-shape" with two monitors flipped 90 degrees. I've had this setup for about 6 ...


6

There are cheap DisplayPort to HDMI splitters, all based on the IDT ViewXpand chipset. You do not get full control over your monitors, mind you, to the OS it's just one huge monitor. But, did I mention it's cheap? http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=101&cp_id=10114&cs_id=1011409&p_id=8117&seq=1&format=2 or http://www.newegg....


6

You can daisy chain up to 6 Thunderbolt devices from a single port, so you can connect the display via an adapter to that without any problems.


6

I would just like to chime in here and note that it is possible to get that DVI display to daisy-chain, but the caveat is that you have to put another Thunderbolt device in between the Thunderbolt display and the Mini DisplayPort->DVI converter. Apple's notes one other caveat about the Thunderbolt display: older Mini DisplayPort displays won't light up ...


6

The compatibility of these monitors with a PC and/or Windows is unclear. Even the FAQs page has a couple of related questions, but these are yet to be answered. However, I wouldn't recommend buying this with the intention of using it with your setup unless you get a definitive answer from either Apple or LG. In the meantime I refer you to this info: At ...


6

From the MacBook Pro Technical Specs page: Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display at millions of colors and: Up to two displays with 5120-by-2880 resolution at 60Hz at over a billion colors. Up to four displays with 4096-by-2304 resolution at 60Hz at over a billion colors. As per Apple, you should be fine with ...


5

First generation MacBook Airs could only drive a single display. And the current generation, Thunderbolt-equipped, MacBook Airs do not support more than one external display via the Thunderbolt port. The graphics chip used in these Macs isn't up to the task of driving extremely high resolution display combinations. Reference: Unfortunately, this ability ...


5

Ars Technica's Eric Bangerman has solved this problem…twice: via Ars gear: 2008 triple-headed "Harpertown" Mac Pro


5

You've pretty much got two options for two external monitors on a MacBook Pro: A) Two Apple Thunderbolt Displays This is the least flexible, but highest performing solution. Obvious drawbacks are the cost, and not being able to use your existing displays. This only works on Thunderbolt equipped Macs with a discrete graphics card (i.e. not the 13" MacBook ...


5

Your calculation is solid. Everywhere I've seen it 109 PPI (which is probably what you intend with DPI) is what people report for the Thunderbolt Cinema Display: Retina display Macs, iPads, and HiDPI: Doing the Math (updated) The TUAW article has this nice picture to catalog various pixels per inch densities: The linked article above even has a Google-...


5

The Thunderbolt display expects a full Thunderbolt signal (that is, muxed PCI-Express and DisplayPort). It will not work with DisplayPort-only sources. To date, I've not heard of any announced (let alone released) adapters that could drive a Thunderbolt display from a non-Thunderbolt source. If you really need to do this, you might be able to hook the Xbox ...


5

Yes you can. Source: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5219?viewlocale=en_US#11


5

Your Thunderbolt monitor has a MagSafe Connector - your MBP has a MagSafe 2 Connector. Apple now supplies a MagSafe to MagSafe 2 converter with the display (check the packaging - the adapter is small). If you are missing the converter, check with Apple - they should give you a replacement.


5

I have had a similar issue a few weeks ago. In my case the screen was not "completely" black, but it was close. Going to the "Display" tab in the settings app and turning up the brightness did the trick. However, it may also be an actual hardware failure if there is nothing at all visible on the screen. In that case you should take the display to an ...


5

I just did what AdamJ said, took my magsafe adapter off and clean it up with a toothbrush to remove dust. It really worked and now my thunderbolt display is charging my macbook pro! :)


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