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Macs can boot into a “Target Disk Mode” that causes them to function like an external hard drive. Connect one Mac to another Mac and you can access its files in the Finder. Before entering Target Disk Mode, you’ll need a few things: Two Macs: Target Disk Mode works with Macs, so you’ll need two Macs for this. Each Mac needs either a Thunderbolt port or a ...


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You can't clone a fully booted Mac to another completely booted Mac Not completely accurate. A fully booted mac can be copied, in it's entirely, to somewhere else. Use Carbon Copy Cloner (easy) or rsync (Unix guru). The only place "somewhere else" cannot be is a booted volume. The hardware hosting the destination can be booted to the desktop, you just ...


6

Depending on the age of your MacBook, you'll have one or more connections on the side that an external screen can connect to. When you identify your MacBook you'll be able figure out the best way to connect a screen, whether it's directly or using an adaptor. If the external monitor doesn't help, the onboard graphics may have gone pop, which might have ...


5

The easy way to access files and back them up is to connect to another Mac via target disk mode. Just the bare minimum parts of the system like the disk controller and selected bus need to work. Does working in Target Disk mode hurt hardware? Apple has support articles and dozens of questions here cover most of the common scenarios to use target disk mode. ...


3

You can't clone a fully booted Mac to another completely booted Mac. At least some files and folders won't be overwritten because they are in use (e.g. the Mach kernel file). Without some direct connection (e.g. Thunderbolt cable, Firewire-to-Thunderbolt cable, Firewire-to-USB 3C etc.) you are left with either the Migration Assistant or a Time Machine ...


3

Here's some clarity for anyone looking. The root cause of the sign in when switching the host is that programs often store their license information x'ord (or otherwise encrypted with) a hash of the host hardware. This means that, when the hardware changes, the previously stored configuration is unrecoverable. I've tried spoofing the MAC address, but all ...


3

Yes - you need an USB C data cable to use this and the power cable Apple ships isn't a data cable for these needs, but the firmware and hardware support target move over USB. Apple's MacBook ports article now has a section titled "USB Target Disk Mode": USB Target Disk Mode Your MacBook with USB-C port supports USB Target Disk Mode. Enable Target Disk ...


3

So I tried it out and wanted to share my findings. First off, the equipment I was using: Early 2015 13" i7 MacBook Air, 8GB Ram, 500GB SSD Late 2015 27" i7 iMac 5K Retina, 16GB Ram, 1TB SSD I restarted the Air in target disk mode & plugged it into the iMac via Thunderbolt 2. It wouldn't boot. After a few minute, it just showed a ban icon (circle with a ...


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One option would be to used your other Macbook Pro to create a Linux boot CD or USB drive, then boot your Macbook from that. By default Ubuntu has read access to HFS+ formatted drives so that should allow you to read your files. Assuming the drive responds. Some resources: How to burn a DVD on OS X How to create a bootable USB stick on OS X How do I boot ...


2

Only FireWire and Thunderbolt support Target Disk Mode. You have to remove the internal disk and put it in an external case with UltraATA interface. Alternatively you may create a bootable thumb drive (MacOS 9.1 or better), boot from it and create an image of your HDD with Disk Copy and save it to a network share. Building a bootable thumb drive and ...


2

Just let it sit - I have the same EXACT situation and while I was researching online, it just "popped up" and was available. It seemed like my good computer was trying to fix the bad computer first, before it mounted as ext hd. Hope this helps.


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In theory you should not loose too much speed. Most modern SSDs utilize SATA 6 Gbit/s SSD controllers which support 500 MB/s read/write speeds. Thunderbolt 2 works at a theoretical 20 Gbit/s. So Thunderbolt2 should not be the bottleneck. However.. Macworld did a performance analysis in 2011. It was a test on Thunderbolt 1, but it should still might give you ...


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I'm pretty sure it can't be done - but I can't find anywhere that categorically says so. Two reasons in your particular case. The iMac 2013 needs Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt, not mini Display Port. Both machines need to be running macOS to enable the function. Macs running Windows in Boot Camp cannot use Target Display Mode. Background info from Apple KB -...


2

Yes, Boot the Mac you want the data from into target disk mode, https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201462. Connect the two Macs and wait. You should be prompted for the file vault password. After you enter the correct file vault password wait some more. After a few minutes the other mac's drive should mount on the desktop. Now copy over any files you want ...


2

You'll need your firmware password to boot into anything other than macOS (which is why it's called a firmware password). If you can't remember your firmware password your only real option is to take your computer to the Apple Store. I believe I read online somewhere they'll have a special key or something like that so you can go in and reset your firmware ...


2

The Macbooks connector is only USB-C (USB 3.1 Gen 1), which is not Thunderbolt 3. You can't connect in target disk mode via a thunderbolt 3 cable. You can use USB-C data cable to connect in USB target disk mode. (Not that this helps, but the Macbook Pro has native thunderbolt 3 support, and would work in this manner.) You also can use migration ...


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Basically, the same way you would view those hidden files on your machine. You just have to go to the correct spot. Volumes mounted via Target Disk Mode can be found in /Volumes of the filesystem. Three common options: From Terminal.app (found in your Applications folder, under Utilities, you can navigate to the target mode machine starting in "/Volumes"....


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You can boot each older laptop into Target disk mode by holding down the T key at startup. The older laptops need to be powered up. This will present the internal HDs on these older laptops as an external HD on your MBP. Both of these older laptops have FireWire 1 ports, however, so a physical connection to your current laptop is problematic as you will ...


1

I did an almost identical recovery a couple days ago. Heres my answer: DON'T USE MACOS BUILT IN TRANSFER METHODS I have found them extremely unreliable, difficult to debug, and unable to resume on failure. Instead, use rsync! Connect via Target Disk Mode. Make sure to ignore permissions on the drive. The following command will recovery everything and ...


1

For the touch-bar 13" MBP the right side ports have reduced bandwidth, this could explain a portion of the difference in speed between the two modes. However, you will likely never see the full speed while running in TDM, that is because TDM runs as a UEFI application within the UEFI rom, this limits the resources that can be used in targeted disk mode. ...


1

Target Disk mode is booting with a T and the OS not running. You will see a FireWire / USB / Thunderbolt icon in this target mode on supported iMac. Target Display mode has no icons and needs the Mac OS to be running and is entered with either Command - F2 or Command - Fn - F2 keys. https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204592 The link above has all the steps ...


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After different kinds of attempts, I finally got it work by some sort of magic. Short answer: USBC 3.1 cable does work, but you have to first leave two MacBooks unconnected, and turn on each other separately. Leave the 12” MacBook stay there for several minutes, with or without power supply, then use the cable to connect. Wait about 5 minutes, the disk will ...


1

Yes and no. Let me explain. Yes if you do it manually in the sense you're just copying the data manually from your Time Machine backup. No if you do it via the installation process or if you do it afterwards using the Migration Assistant app (usually found in your Utilities folder). It's also a 'No' if you use the restore options built into Time Machine ...


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This is exactly what the free Duplicate is designed for. It adds a copy/paste contextual menu item to the Finder (using Finder Extensions, sanctioned by Apple) which allows anything to be copied and pasted to make a faithful duplicate - even a bootable disk. Full disclosure: I am the author.


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I haven't tried - but I'd start with Carbon Copy Cloner - http://www.bombich.com or this, which I just discovered today: https://macdaddy.io/duplicate/


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Yes, you can boot an iMac from the Mac Book volume using Target Disk Mode. The main issue to be aware of is many programs will ask you to log in again, including App Store apps.


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If you boot your Mac into Target Disk Mode, you can access all of its files (provided you have the pertinent credentials) using another Mac. To start, reboot while holding down the T key on the Mac of which you would like to access the disk. Once booted into Target Disk Mode, connect it to another Mac. This can be done using a FireWire or Thunderbolt cable,...


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Mac OS X SLA doesn't allow to run older Mac OS Xs in a VM until Max OS X Server 10.6.8 or Mac OS X 10.7 and later. Additionally there are some technical restrictions. So none of them will run directly in VMware Fusion, Parallels or VirtualBox. To get an image of the MacBook3,1 running in one of those three you would have to update it to Snow Leopard Server ...


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Only some of the non-5k display iMacs have target display mode. No MacBooks have (yet) had that capability as part of their hardware. You'll need to do screen sharing or some other software solution if you need it.


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S.M.A.R.T is a monitoring system for HDD and SSD implemented in the firmware of a drive using two different standards: ATA and SCSI. SMART data is usually written to a special service part of the platter/flash storage unit. All modern interface standards and the underlying protocols (SCSI, FireWire, USB – with USB-(S)ATA-Bridges, eSATA, Thunderbolt, SAS) ...


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