Hot answers tagged

99

Regarding how to prevent this in the future (question #3): Log in to iCloud Calendar on a computer web browser Authenticate if needed, then select the Calendar view Select the Settings Gear icon ⚙ in the bottom left corner then hit Preferences... Select Advanced Choose the option to receive calendar invitations by email instead of allowing the server to ...


69

I've had the exact same email. I've managed to get rid of it by doing the following: Create a new iCloud calendar - I called mine junk Move the spam invite to the new Junk calendar Delete the newly created Junk calendar with the spam appointment in it - ensuring you select the 'Delete and Don't Notify' option in the Dialog box that appears. This worked for ...


14

Mail.app > Preferences > Viewing > uncheck "Load remote content in messages" You will then have this banner at the top of each message that contains remote content (just in case you do want to see the images): Aside: I still see the occasional image in a message when looking through my spam folder. As best I can tell when I "view raw source" the spammers ...


10

Apple made a 'report junk' button inside the calendar app on iCloud.com - when you report an invite it will be deleted across all synced calendars. If you get an invitation that you think is junk or spam, you can report it to iCloud. Sign in to iCloud.com with your Apple ID, then click Calendar. Open the event you want to report, then click ...


8

Is there any way to get rid of Genieo manually? The only way is to do so manually. Carefully follow Thomas Reed's Genieo Removal Guide to completely rid your machine of the offending adware. Here is an abbreviated version of Thomas Reed's guide: Quit Genio. Remove /private/etc/launchd.conf. If it's not present, move on. If it is, trash it and restart the ...


7

Phishing & Other Suspicious Emails Apple offer the e-mail address reportphishing@apple.com for this purpose: Reporting Suspected Phishing Attempts If you receive what you believe to be a phishing email purporting to be from Apple, please send it to reportphishing@apple.com, a monitored email inbox, which does not generate individual email ...


7

This doesn't currently seem possible using the accepted answer, at least if the inviter is in your contacts - it needs some sort of action from Apple. Please make a comment if there is extra privacy against invites from people not in your contacts (I thought it worth making an answer for this, given that information still seems to leak). I tried the ...


5

It's simply that anyone can send an email to you. If spam rules don't block it, Apple software (with default settings) processes the invitation before you can take any action. To prevent this automatic processing, try this. Log in to iCloud on the web, open your calendar and go to ⚙ > Preferences (in the lower left corner). Under Advanced tab you’ll find ...


5

Yes, there IS a free and easy way to block incoming nuisance calls on an iPhone! (1) Get and install a silent ringtone (I use one called "10 seconds of silence" which I found on the internet for free). (2) You know who your regular callers are. Give each contact a ringtone other than the default. (Yes, it takes a few minutes, but it's a one-time thing.) (3) ...


4

From the messages list, swipe left on the message to mark as spam, tap on the label icon, and select Spam.


4

A spammer could validate reception by inserting an image which is hosted on a remote server in a HTML email. A unique code per recipient could be appended to the URL of the image, at which point the remote server can know which addresses recieved and opened the email. While the default setting on iOS is to load remote images automatically (and hence makes ...


4

I get these messages when I connect to the China Unicom network. I think the "Cancel/Accept" dialog is hardcoded into iOS for the purpose of accepting the carrier's terms of use. These messages come from the sim card, and I think only the carrier can send them. It's sleazy for the carrier to use this functionality for advertising.


4

I do not believe iPhone has the ability to block phone numbers based on area code or other such rules. However, you might consider two options for spam blocking tools. I use both of these, and have no affiliation with either. The first is a free option for iPhone, called Hiya. Hiya uses iOS CallKit framework, that integrates with the phone app to provide ...


3

Mail.app has a feature called rules that enables you to automate your mail tasks. You can define rules in the Mail preferences.


3

I suggest you to go to Mail.app → View → Message → All Headers and analyze that headers. If appears any server not related to iCloud, then copy the content of Mail.app → View → Message → Raw Source window and report in spamcop.net.


3

This is spam, introduced by an extension, through superfish.com. AdBlock is not the cause! AdBlock blocks the injected ad, so the extension inserts the text equivalent. Disabling AdBlock will remove the text, because it allows the original injection to take place, and will decrease page load time as the secondary text injection is no longer required. ...


3

I'll leave the iOS version below,. as that actually works - but for OS X it's nowhere near as efficient. Messages > Prefs > Accounts > Blocked Click + You can type the phone number but nothing will happen unless the number is already recognised as a Contact [which is frankly infuriating]. One workaround might be to make a Contact called "zzz spam" & ...


3

If your mum can't delete the mail after restarting or disconnecting from the network and restarting, you can look at one of two Delete the mails using a webmail interface and then delete the account from the iPad. Then contact your ISP/Mail provider if the mail syncs down after you have cleared it from webmail. If you can't delete the mail off webmail - ...


2

I went to toolbar, on my mac. Genieo was on the top right hand side. I clicked on the icon and pressed "disconnect". This allowed me to move it into trash. It's the most annoying software which was attached to a budget planner. Hope this helps. It worked for me.


2

Note: The previous answer is wrong. Correct answer is the message is from the service provider. Thanks to @duci9y for the correction.


2

In short, your account wasn't hacked or compromised if someone you don't know places a call or SMS or iMessage or FaceTime call to your address. Sadly, you can't easily block or change your iMessage and FaceTime account today, but if this grows, I would expect a way to block things just like the phone company now has various options for blocking unwanted ...


2

One big change since El Capitan - Mail is now in V3 Earlier OSes used the V2 folder. Try clearing the saved state, rebuilding & reindexing the database... Clear Saved State Switch to Finder, Cmd ⌘ N for a new window, then Cmd ⌘ Shift ⇧ G for Go To... copy/paste ~/Library/Saved Application State/com.apple.mail.savedState then Enter ⌅ ...


2

If you see it on your screen, it has been downloaded (would be difficult to show something which has not been downloaded). It doesn't matter whether you just preview something or open it in an app, technically there is no real difference. The question behind the question probably is "should I worry?". Nobody can say for sure without much more information ...


2

With regard to #2 (how to delete without sending a notification to the sender) -- I don't have an answer yet, but I can confirm that the up-voted answer from Jackal above ("move spam event into temporary calendar, then delete temporary calendar") still sends a DECLINE to the sender. Understandably many folks here and in other social media venues that are ...


2

You do not have a virus. Websites and ads can open the App Store and can compose new emails. However it is very bad behaviour of websites or ads to open the App Store without users consent. What website did you visit?


2

In addition to the answer above that you can't block patterns without a third party extension (which you could compile and run yourself with Xcode assuming sufficient skill in programming) there is going to be some sort of change needed by the carriers. Keep in mind the spammers are calling every phone number in the book these days. You really need to write ...


2

One way would be to get a silent ringtone and set it as the default, then set another ringtone with actual sound for the contacts you want to hear calling. There are plenty of silent ringtones available to buy in the iTunes Tones store, but it would also be a simple one to create yourself.


2

No - Apple doesn't sell out emails and the simple explanation is that this resource just tried all mail addresses possible at Apple and now knows your mail is valid (or doesn't know it's not valid) and will keep spamming it forever since they don't actually have permission or a lead - they're just being nasty like someone that robo calls all the phone ...


1

The short answer to this is NO. I think you are confusing Gmail's SPAM filtering methodology with single user methodology. What you have to remember is that Gmail is a cloud based service and it IS providing mail service to billions of users. So, even though you have a single email address with SPAM filtering, it's filtering for all users. Additionally, ...


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