62

The built-in VNC client with OS X works just great with most VNC servers I've tried on FreeBSD. I've mostly been using TigerVNC from ports (seems to be the fastest with OS X's VNC client), and the only issue I have is when I restart the VNC server while connected to it. The OS X VNC client will reconnect (great!) but it sizes the window oddly, and I can't ...


19

Run this command in the terminal to fix the external screen going blank on VNC disconnect. Works with Sierra OS. sudo defaults write /Library/Preferences/com.apple.RemoteManagement RestoreMachineState -bool NO More context from jabenninghoff on GitHub: In newer versions of macOS, screen sharing will automatically re-lock the screen when you disconnect ...


15

ARD into your "work account" and then do the following on the remote computer to open a Screen Sharing window to your "personal account" on the same remote computer. Create an SSH tunnel. It works for me using 10.9. Enable Remote Login (SSH) in System Preferences > Sharing, and in Terminal run: ssh -NL 5901:localhost:5900 localhost Finally, use Screen ...


15

Other answers here are correct - it is not possible to remotely access a freshly-booted Mac with FileVault enabled without physical access (FileVault operates 1 layer closer to actual software than a 'traditional' BIOS or firmware password). It is, however, possible to remotely reboot a Mac and force it to allow remote access even with FileVault enabled, ...


15

This appears to be a bug in MacOS Mojave's VNC implementation. Thankfully, I have found a workaround. In the settings app, select Sharing. Then select "Screen Sharing" on the left and click on the "Computer Settings..." button. In the dialog that pops up, check "Anyone may request permission to control screen" and un-check "VNC viewers may control screen ...


14

There is a very cool command line utility called cscreen. The developer has a number of versions available. Depending on how old your Mac is, you either want the PPC version, or the Intel version. If your Mac is newer than a 2006 model, you probably want the Intel version. Once you have downloaded the disk image, double click the image to mount it, then ...


14

Remote login should be allowed (System Preferences -> Sharing -> Remote login). Connect via ssh: ssh user@host Run sudo pkill loginwindow Connect using VNC as usual


10

I see some kind of ambiguity in answers here :-) I'd suggest to tell technologies and underlying protocols apart. VNC: uses RFB protocol. Apple Screen Sharing [SS] (which is enabled by checking "Screen Sharing" in System Prefs): it is a vanilla VNC plus some Apple-specific extensions, e.g. pasteboard auto synchronization, display selection, screen locking,...


9

Will have to go into system preferences, keyboard, shortcuts, and then assign a specific key to activate Mission Control. You can do this either in your host machine or in the remote one. What matters is that the shortcut for the remote machine is not used in the local machine. You can do the same directly for the ^right and ^left shortcuts. Change them in ...


9

OK, I sussed it out. You can still do it, it's just that the way you do it is based on context rather than using the appropriate command. Basically, to use the virtual display, you need multiple user accounts on the target machine, and you need an account to be already logged into the target machine such that you can login a 2nd time using the virtual ...


9

The answer depends on how you connect to it. If you're using a standard VNC client to connect with a password only, nothing is encrypted. Not even the password. If you're using the Screen Sharing app on macOS 10.8 (Mountain Lion) or later to connect with a username/password or AppleID, everything is encrypted. If you're using the Screen Sharing app on ...


8

Tricky one, but you can rig up a solution - I'm not sure about the final quality though. First, you need to allow your iPad to use AirPlay Mirroring with your iMac as the target device. To do this, you need to use a program like AirServer ($15 for a single user license) or Reflector ($15 again, but has a trial at least) or AirMac (Free, but not as fully ...


8

To start screensharing: sudo launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.screensharing.plist To stop: sudo launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.screensharing.plist The -w flag modifies the Disabled key as appropriate. It's best to let launchctl handle this, as the location where the config files are stored has changed ...


8

On OS X Yosemite the Screen Sharing app moved to the applications subfolder: /System/Library/CoreServices/Applications


7

ssh into the remote Mac and kill the screensharingd daemon. $ ps ax | grep screen 1234 ?? Ss 0:00.02 /System/Library/CoreServices/RemoteManagement/screensharingd.bundle/Contents/MacOS/screensharingd $ sudo kill 1234 It works for me. I have Mac OS X Lion on both local and remote computers.


7

Screen Sharing Screen sharing is actually built-in already. Enable "Screen Sharing" in System Preferences -> Sharing on the computer you want to access remotely. Then you can access it from the Finder either by selecting it in the sidebar window or directly via Cmd-K and entering the address vnc://IP-Address or vmc://Bonjour Name.local.


7

Go to System Preferences > Sharing and uncheck the box to the left of "Screen Sharing"


7

There are three solutions that I know of that allow you to "black out" the remote screen so that uses cannot see what you are doing: Apple Remote Desktop (ARD). Cost: $79 TightVNC. Cost: Free for personal use. TeamViewer. Cost: Free for personal use ($810 for Business License) As for ARD and VNC, they will do they job, but as far as performance, they ...


7

I couldn't find an answer online so I took to checking for incoming connections and also in the list of active processes so I could find how to fix it. You need to grant Accesibility privileges to AppleVNCServer which you can find under /System/Library/CoreServices/RemoteManagement/AppleVNCServer.bundle/Contents/MacOS/AppleVNCServer


6

Yes. And you can make it work through most firewalls if you're both using Messages. Messages will broker the handshake to start the session and then turn it over to the screen sharing app. Start up Messages and make sure Screen Sharing is enabled: Find your buddy in your contact list in Messages and click on them. Then select Buddies -> Share My Screen ...


6

Some (all?) Macs when run without a monitor turn off the video circuitry so they do not waste energy, even though this circuitry is used by screen sharing to dramatically speed up screen stuff. There might be a way to turn this circuitry back on through software, but I have not foud a reliable way to do so. What works very well is to plug in something into ...


6

You can connect to remote Linux machines with your Mac's built-in vnc client. Setup the vnc server on the remote Linux machine. On your Mac, go to Finder. Press cmd+K or Go > Connect to Server. In the Server Address, enter vnc://{HOST}:{PORT}. For example vnc://linux.myhost.com:5901. A VNC session will be connected to the remote Linux machine with the ...


6

The three ways to connect are Apple Remote Desktop, ssh and remote Apple Events. If you have one of those enabled, you can kickstart screen sharing with a command line tool: sudo /System/Library/CoreServices/RemoteManagement/ARDAgent.app/Contents/Resources/kickstart -activate -configure -access -on -restart -agent -privs -all See these for more details: ...


6

These are solutions that I found but that do not work for me: UPDATE: The issue finally and miraculously disappeared after updating to macOS 10.12.4. If you run third party applications, such as AirParrot or f.lux, you should try completely uninstalling those, as discussed here. If your mac is 100% headless (i.e. no screen attached), you can either add an ...


5

Apple answer: https://support.apple.com/kb/PH14152 Choose Edit >Use Shared Clipboard. Using the shared clipboard, you can: Copy text and images from documents on one Mac and paste them into documents on the other. Select and drag text and images from one Mac to the other. Copy a link from your web browser and paste it into a web browser ...


5

do a spotlight search on the remote mac with the string "mission control". Works on Yosemite at least


5

On an iPad 2 or iPad (3rd Generation) almost every video signal can be mirrored out via the dock port and an appropriate cable/adaptor — VGA, or HDMI. That video signal can be input into a capture device, be that a computer or a dedicated device. I've linked to the Apple versions of the video out adaptors, but there are also third-party versions available, ...


5

Using remote desktop tools, yes. For example, Remoter VNC, LogMeIn, and Teamviewer come to mind immediately.


5

Try out Reflector by Air Squirrels. It works very well on the Mac, has a windows version and also appears to have a trial version. You can make sure it works before spending money on a license.


5

It's under /System/Library/CoreServices/Applications/Screen\ Sharing.app here. You should still be able to call it directly (e.g. via Spotlight) or just use Cmd-K in Finder to initiate a VNC session (use vnc:NAME-OF-REMOTE-SYSTEM as address).


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