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24

I know this thread is old, but I'd like to leave here what solved the problem for me. You need to check if you have the same security in both access points. For example, I had one access point secured with WPA/WPA2 and another with WPA2 only. After changing both to the same, everything was fine. To check your access points' security, you can do this: While ...


12

Yes, this is possible and actually quite simple. To prevent the Time Capsule from acting as a WiFi access point or router, and use it only as a backup disk, just open the AirPort Utility app on a Mac (Applications -> Utilities -> AirPort Utility) and do the following: Select your Time Capsule and hit Edit. Go to the tab labeled Wireless (not Network as ...


10

Yes, using the Airport Utility you can turn off the router and WiFi functionality independently of each other. Under the Wireless tab - Network Mode: select Off Under the Network tab - Router Mode: select Off At this point you can connect the Time Capsule to the wired network using the ports with a horizontal icon <-> or even use it to receive the ...


10

Your issue is being caused by OS X's handling of a wi-fi parameter commonly referred to as roaming threshold. This parameter dictates the point at which an OS will switch to a stronger signal. Windows gives easy access to this parameter, example here, but no simple option exists in OS X. This document from NYU suggests OS X has "aggressive" roaming ...


8

A common fix for this is to make a new location under the Network pane in System Preferences. Open System Preferences. Click on Network. In the window that loads after that, near the top, is a drop-down menu labelled "Location:" Click on the drop-down menu and choose "Edit Locations..." In the next window that slides down click the + sign. A new line will ...


8

Been there, done that. I found the source to my problem, but not something that might be a general answer for all with this problem. After exhausting the other answers here, I just started trying anything. What I discovered was that I have an external HD connected by firewire, and had it running when I rebooted after installing software. With the drive ...


7

Just to clarify, the term "router" is incorrect here mostly because it is used incorrectly by manufacturers who sell products in the retail market. A router is neither compatible nor incompatible with Time Machine. A router simply routes network traffic (packets) from one network to another. What these retail "routers" actually are is an amalgamation of ...


6

I had the exact same issue with a tplink access point and this made me crazy. Nothing worked for me, until i found the solution: Disable WMM in the wireless advanced settings!!!


6

Yes, you can simply disable routing on TimeCapsule and set it as DHCP client.


6

I suggest to use networksetup which works persistent and also in separate network locations. First, open your terminal of choice i.e. iTerm2.app or Terminal.app list your network locations: networksetup -listlocations choose your desired network location: sudo networksetup -switchtolocation <locationofchoice> list "devices" called ...


6

This answer is a quick summary of what the fields mean in the routing table display of netstat. You can find all this information directly from the netstat man page (man netstat) or for an excellent primer, see FreeBSD's Handbook Chapter 31.2 - Gateway's and Routes. (Apple's netstat comes from the BSD version). Flags The flags field shows a collection of ...


5

You only need a router if you want to "route" a network connection to more than 1 device. If you only want to have 1 device connected to your network then you don't need a router. If you add another network-enabled device (TV, printer, another computer, etc), then you will need a router to share & control the network traffic.


4

Product description According to the datasheet, it looks like this device's share functionality does not work with Macs at all, since you need to install a driver to get USB-via-Ethernet support. From the footer of the last page of the PDF you link to: Minimum System Requirements Computer with: Windows® 76, Windows Vista®6, Windows® XP ...


4

Currently there is no way to jailbreak either an Airport Extreme or a Time Capsule. Whilst they are probably in the same order of difficulty as jailbreaking as say an iOS device, no one has really spent any effort on doing so. Personally I think this is probably for the following reasons: limited target audience (low numbers of product in the world) ...


4

Wireless is a complicated topic and you need to consult a speciality website like smallnetbuilder.com if you want to understand things like range, performance, and capabilities of different routers. The Apple Extreme/Express are more expensive, require an Apple utility that runs only on iOS/OS X/Windows, and are not the most feature rich. However, they are ...


4

System Preferences -> Network -> Pick your Adapter -> Advanced -> TCP/IP Tab :) See screenshot here: Your computer's IP is marked "IPv4 Address" (192.168.1.74) and your router's IP is marked "Router" (i.e. 192.168.1.1 in my case).


4

The newest OS X Server versions don't provide any tools to enable NAT/Routing in OS X. To get NAT working without using Internet Sharing you have to use a pf rule and create a plist to enable forwarding and load the pf rule: Below I assume en0: the interface connected to the cable modem and en1: the interface connected to the LAN. DHCP and DNS are set up ...


3

Go with: 802.11g/n That setting covers the first generation iPad through to the latest iPad that got announced yesterday as well as the first generation iPhone through to the latest iPhone 4S. Your devices should pick the faster protocol (N) if they support it. If not, they'll use the slower protocol (G). But between G and N you've got just about all ...


3

Try this... Sharing your Internet connection - http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?path=Mac/10.5/en/8156.html Your mac will basically create a WiFi network for the iPad to join and then it will share traffic from the ethernet connector/PPPoE/cable. Your mac's buit in help might be newer than the link I provided, so check there first. Also, be sure you ...


3

Going into keychain and deleting the entry for the wifi network solved it. Just connected to the network again and entered my credentials. There was something wrong with either the password (I doubt this) or the authentication mechanism that was somehow paired with the keychain entry. Anyway, this also means that going the manual way, as suggested by ...


3

ddclient is what I use on my Linux boxes. Works really well. You can find instructions details here: http://sourceforge.net/apps/trac/ddclient I think all you would need to do to get ddclient to run is to a @reboot line to your crontab and you’re set. crontab -e then add this line: @reboot /usr/sbin/ddclient -daemon 300 -syslog


3

Have you tried going to the Network preference pane in System Preferences, clicking on Advanced, then Wi-Fi, and deleting all the Preferred Networks? I seem to recall having the same problem a few years ago, and deleting the networks fixed it.


3

Deleting all networks in Mac, System Preferences, Network fixed the identical problem for me.


3

Unfortunately Apple based networks cannot be extended using non-Apple devices. Even though in theory it should work without any problems, Apple has restricted using 3rd party routers to extended wireless network, and vice versa, non-Apple based wireless networks cannot be extended using Apple routers. The workaround is to connect both, your Airport Express ...


3

Go to System Preferences > Network > Wifi Click on Advanced Remove the preferred networks from the list by using - button


3

1. Wireless interference The most common cause of what you describe here is a common wireless interference problem. This probability is pretty high if your network loss of performance was closely related with the move of wirelessly connected computer or of pieces of furniture made of metal or glass (these cause many radiofrequency reflections). If you want ...


3

Below is a network diagram based on what I have read thus far. I have made some assumptions about the IP numbering conventions, but that will have no effect on the overall scenario. I am assuming that you are using two different subnets rather than 2 different classes of networks. But, either way, you have two very different network IP addressing schemes ...


3

It should be possible to create a bridge with en0 and en2 and enable net.inet.ip.forwarding to get rid of all routing problems. The bridge acts more or less as another switch between en0 and en2. Disable Internet Sharing remove the gateway in the en2 settings of the Mac mini and change the IP-address to an available one in 192.168.88.0/24 (e.g. 192.168.88....


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