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13

You must disable System Integrity Projection. Restart the computer, while booting hold down Command-R to boot into recovery mode. Once booted, navigate to the “Utilities > Terminal” in the top menu bar. Enter csrutil disable in the terminal window and hit the return key. Restart the machine and System Integrity Protection will now be disabled. source: ...


6

I have done this myself. First install REFIt, an utility for dual/triple booting. It adds a useful selection of OSes on startup. It also includes a EFI/MBR fixing tool which is very useful. You might need to restart 2 times. Using the Disk Utility, add 2 more partitions to your disk. Format them FAT or FAT32. Restart your machine, and this time, assuming you ...


6

No, rEFIt is software and therefore should not affect the hardware warranty. However, if you're concerned about that and want to avoid trouble (there's always the odd thickheaded customer service rep, even at Apple), you can simply wipe your drive and do a clean OS X reinstall before you send your machine in for service (and restore from backup once you get ...


6

Check Ubuntu's tutorial how to create a bootable USB stick on macOS, where it is suggested to use Etcher app (open source) which can help to flash OS image to SD cards & USB drives. However, if the official ISO file downloaded from releases.ubuntu.com doesn't work (for Ubuntu), you can try to customize/respun it by using isorespin.sh script (check ...


6

First install rEFInd, and boot Ubuntu installer after. Enable "Boot after power failure" by adding next line to /etc/rc.local: setpci -s 0:1f.0 0xa4.b=0 setpci -s 00:03.0 0x7b.b=0x19 Install mac fan control: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mactel-support/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y macfanctld applesmc-dkms For SSD tunning (you have to ...


5

When first posted in 2013, this question never received an answer, because there is no answer. In other words, Intel Macs can not BIOS boot from flash drives. I make the BIOS boot assumption based the the following phase from the OP's question: "UEFI removed in order to be able to boot on Macs" If the OP assumes the UEFI boot method has been removed, ...


5

Yes, certainly. Removing the original drive will leave it exactly as it was before.


5

Note: El Capitan (OS X 10.11) prevents users from selecting rEFInd and common Linux distributions from the Startup Disk pane. The new preferred method is to install rEFInd into the an EFI partition. My answer, to an unrelated question, outlines this new preferred method to start the rEFInd Boot Manager and Linux operating systems. The answer, given below, ...


5

I know this is an old question, but I just had to go through this issue when attempting to install rEFInd on a 2015 MBP. When trying to install by running ./refind-install in the terminal, I kept getting a message telling me that system integrity protection was enabled, and I could not do an install without rebooting into the recovery volume. The solution ...


4

Start up in single-user mode and remove reFIT Shut down your Mac if it is on. Press the power button to start the computer. Immediately press and hold ⌘+S for single-user mode. At the prompt, type /sbin/fsck -fy Press Enter or Return key to execute the command. Text will start updating the progress...if there is damage, the final line will say *****...


4

If you disable journaling for the Macintosh partition (in order to access files from within Linux) this should work: hold ⌥ upon boot select Recovery HD OR boot from Mac install DVD/USB open Disk Utility. Select Macintosh HD. Hold ⌥ and click on File. Select Disable Journaling. boot from a Linux Live CD. Open root terminal. delete /Library/...


4

Though you shouldn't see this message (even with SIP enabled) in Recovery Mode you can type Y and continue installing rEFInd. A less rocky but time consuming way is to disable SIP in Recovery Mode by entering csrutil disable in Terminal.app. After rebooting to your main boot volume open Terminal.app, enter csrutil status and if SIP is disabled, install ...


4

Examine with diskutil list diskutil info /dev/disk0 (disk0s1 etc.) sudo gpt -r show disk0 fdisk /dev/disk0 (make/change partitioning with MBR) sudo gdisk -l /dev/disk0 (make/change partitioning with GUID) refit Partition Inspector / gptsync diskutil is the OS X program to get info on and change partitions. $ diskutil list /dev/disk0 #: ...


4

Press and hold the C key on boot to attempt booting from the optical drive. If that doesn't work I'd recommend trying the boot CD in another machine, and a different boot CD in the mac.


4

If you wish to attempt to use rEFInd from a MS-DOS partition, then follow the instructions below. I have made the following assumptions. You will be reusing disk0s3. System Integrity Protection is enabled. You have booted to macOS. Do not boot to macOS Recovery. Secure Boot is is set to "No Security". Below are the steps. Enter the following command to ...


4

Solution: EDIT: Thank you to @DavidAnderson for pointing out that the driver file "hfs_x64.efi" is what causes the Mac to be able to see the bootable container on the mac. Please see his answer for a better explanation. The solution is very brief and involves installing the "driver_x64" folder included with the refind download in refind-bin_X/refind/...


3

Assuming you have rEFIt installed on one of the partitions on the hard drive, the following steps should remove the delay: Boot via the Mac OS X Install DVD/USB. Launch Terminal (Utilities Menu). Enter diskutil list to list all available disks and partitions. Looking at the list of partitions for "disk0" (internal drive), identify the partition that ...


3

I had the same exact issue with my MacBook Pro and I have rEFInd installed as well. I resolved the problem disabling the autopoweroff option with pmset. See this answer.


3

Update - i was able to solve this situation. The simplest solutions evade at times. In case someone else runs into this, what i did- In the grub menu i was trying to see if i could do something in the command line interface.. Just typed exit & immediately i was popped back onto refind. Immediately booted into OS X & reinstalled refind..


3

The ESP is normally used for the boot loader on ‘normal’ EFI systems, however on a Mac the ESP is not—it is usually empty, but has been used as a staging area for firmware updates. A Mac will initially look in the ESP for anything to boot from, but if it is empty or non-existant, it will look for the root file system to boot from.


3

With the release of rEFInd 0.10.0, there's no official rEFInd documentation on this issue: http://www.rodsbooks.com/refind/sip.html That version's installation script (now called refind-install) also runs from the Recovery HD, and rEFInd itself can manage SIP settings, which give two more options for how to work around the issue.


3

Disk Utility for macOS Sierra: Partition a physical disk using Disk Utility Please make sure to preform a backup prior to partitioning. Although a standard process, there's always an increased risk of corruption or failure when modifying partitions. But this shouldn't be an issue as you have been backing up regularly........right? Disk Utility for macOS ...


3

Is it normal to not have /usr/env/bin in the recovery partition? Yes, it's perfectly normal for /usr/bin/env to not be in the recovery partition. If you were to mount the Recovery partition and open the BaseSystem.dmg container to search for the file, you'll find that it doesn't exist. $ diskutil list #: TYPE NAME ...


3

Many commands are missing when booted to the Recovery partition. If the macOS, you normally boot to, is in good order, then you can restore access to the missing commands by following the instructions given below. You can access the missing commands by updating the PATH variable. To do this you will need to know the name of the macOS startup disk. The steps ...


3

I suspect the ‘refind-install’ script has a shebang pointing to /usr/bin/env, such as #!/usr/bin/env bash The Recovery environment doesn't have a /usr/bin/env, so attempting to access that path returns the error that there's ‘no such file or directory’ there. You can manually choose a shell to execute a script with by passing the script to the shell: ...


3

Normally, rEFInd relies on the Mac firmware to read Apple formatted partitions. Eventually, this software is not sufficient in certain circumstances. You can include all the drivers provided with rEFInd by adding the --alldrivers option when executing the ./refind-install script. However the refind-install man page states the following with regard to this ...


2

Try to use dd: dd bs=4M if=path_to_iso of=path_to_usb && sync Replace path_to_iso and path_to_usb with appropriate paths.


2

"When you have rEFIt installed and you apply the shortcut to boot in single user mode (⌘+S), you actually land in the EFI shell. In order to avoid that, boot as usual. Then choose the Apple icon and press F2. You will be presented with a series of alternate options to boot Mac OS X (e.g. single user mode, verbose mode, etc.)" http://tateric.blogspot.com/...


2

diskutil list | grep EFI | awk '{print $6}' This will only output the lines of containing the string "efi" and of that line, only the 6th column, so the output is: disk0s1 You already did this part it looks like your EFI disk is disk0s1 sudo mkdir /Volumes/efi sudo mount -t msdos /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/efi sudo rm -rfP /Volumes/efi/EFI/refind sudo bless -...


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