Hot answers tagged

23

Apple Recycling Program You can recycle it and receive a 10% discount on a new iPod. This is not only profitable for you and apple, but also a responsible way of deposing it. Apple often achieves a 90 percent recovery rate by weight of the original product.


13

I would try to fix it, sell it, or recycle it. In that order. Try looking into fixing the iPod if your up for the task, since like you said there should be nothing really wrong with it other than a super dead battery. Probably the only thing you would need to buy to fix it is a new battery and a few simple tools to aid in opening the case. I recommend ...


8

If you're 100% convinced it's broken, you can try one of the 75 tutorials listed here. Otherwise, there’s always the Apple Recycling program for iPods. It won't cost you any money and I'm sure Apple will find a way to reuse your iPod.


7

Personally, I would lean against this for several reasons: The aluminum used in the Mac Pro cases isn't food grade metal. Some of the adhesives in the case were potentially noxious. I realize it's tongue in cheek, but keep safe, people. :) Edit: The frame of the Mac Pro(s) are basically aluminum. So you can take it to your local metal recycler and have ...


3

Well, personally, I would sell it. You can try the Apple Recycling Program since they usually give you SOME money back, 90% of the time they can figure out a way to reuse it, and they could even give you a discount towards your next iPod purchase. If you live in the United States, you can also try using Gazelle. They buy old Apple products and send you cash,...


2

I would be tempted to get the tools needed to open the case and play with it to learn how the hardware was designed and assembled. You can always choose to recycle it and might instead decide that the iPod case will make a perfect housing for the many new computers that are being released like the Raspberry Pi or the Cstick cotton candy. You will of course ...


1

Although related, Apple recycling program and Trade-in program are slightly different. Apple recycling program primarily concerns with providing an avenue to recycle used hardware in an environmentally responsible way. It also gives Apple the opportunity to reuse certain components again. You are generally not paid when you recycle old/used products. It's ...


1

It won't switch on or take a charge because the battery has degraded. This happens when: 1) You store a device with a dead battery (or battery below 50% charge), this applies to Li-Ion and Li-Po batteries! 2) You store a device with a battery in a cold environment (applies to all batteries) If you can get your hands on a replacement battery, it'll likely ...


1

You could use the internal hard drive and screen for many a hobbyist project, as long as they aren't what is preventing the iPod from working. IMO, the battery is probably dead as a result of how long it's been stored between charges.


1

If it's the same one I have (this one), you may be using the wrong power adapter. Although the dock connector (the wide bit) is the same one Apple is using on nearly all of their products these days, that model of iPod will only charge with a Firewire cable, and most (all?) of the power adapters and cables Apple is making these days are USB. Hopefully it ...


1

I have that exact same model in the same situation. I've found that the batteries in those old iPods tend to not last very long when kept in storage. If you want to make the iPod work again, you can get replacement batteries at a number of sites. You can also replace the hard drive with a Compact Flash card to turn it into a solid-state player (which will ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible