Hot answers tagged

9

The kext signing restriction was integrated into System Integrity Protection starting in El Capitan, and as a result the old disable flag no longer works. But there's a new way to do it: boot in recovery mode, and run the command csrutil enable --without kext. I haven't tested it, but my understanding is that this will turn off the kext requirements, while ...


8

According to Apple KB : Prepare your institution for iOS 10 and macOS Sierra ...you must use the nvram command to properly set boot-args NVRAM variable. Starting with macOS Sierra, you must be booted to the recovery partition to run this command.


7

To clarify, for PowerPC based Macs, this memory was called PRAM, but for Intel based Macs, the proper name is NVRAM. To show the contents of the NVRAM or even manipulate them, you can use the nvram shell commando in Terminal. For info on usage, execute man nvram. If you just want to display the entire contents of the NVRAM, you can execute it with th -p ...


7

The answer is that yes, you are allowed to delete files from /private/var/folders/. The command sudo rm -r -P /private/var/folders/tr/* was able to work and no crashes came of it. Some errors were issued by the command, but no errors came from the system as a whole. I might issue a new post later on when I know more about this to understand what Apple did ...


7

You can recreate the NVRAM reset's ⌘-⌥-P-R with a PC keyboard by pressing: Windows Key + Alt + P + R


6

From this (very useful!) page : http://www.cnet.com/news/how-to-manage-os-x-boot-options-with-wireless-keyboards/ I found the answer you want. And I quote: The "boot-args" variable can be used for setting the above modes. but in addition if you need to load the system into Target Disk mode, you can do so by setting the "target-mode" PRAM variable in the ...


5

sudo nvram boot-args="debug=0x144" This is a combination of kernel debugging features that will show you extra information about the kernel's processes, which can be exceptionally useful if a system is experiencing kernel panics. Another option is to use debug=0x14e, which will display even more logging options. The primary use for this is that it enables ...


4

After reading your question a few times I've made an assumption (dangerous, I know). My assumption is that the only password you're being prompted for is your daughter's User Account password and NOT a firmware password. The reason I assume this is because the only reason (it seems) that you think it's prompting for a firmware password is because of Adriano'...


3

You can also from the terminal in Yosemite run: sudo nvram -c and then restart the computer.


3

Nate , PRAM reset is not working because you turn on Password Firmware Protection. Turn it off and P+R+Option+Command will work.


3

I got the similar issue and resolved the with the help above solution.Thanks.. Get into Recovery Mode by restarting and holding down ⌘+R until Apple logo appears. In the top menu click Utilities > Terminal. In the Terminal window type: csrutil enable --without kext and press Enter. Then restart the Mac.


3

In a Terminal type man nvram and press: enter You'll see that the -p option states: Print all of the firmware variables. Therefore whatever it prints, is what's stored in NVRAM. There should not be any hidden variables, however the output for some variables may not be in what's generally considered as human readable format.


3

As you have already found, you can't reset the NVRAM1 because your Caps key is in the "locked" state. What this does is add another key to the NVRAM reset sequence making it Command Option P R Caps - this will never work. However, we do have a solution to get you around the Caps problem... Hook up the Windows keyboard Boot normally and enter your password ...


3

Troubleshooting is a process of elimination and you seem to have started off well, doing most of the obvious first steps. Below are some additional steps I'd try next, especially since reinstalling macOS only resolved the problem for a week or so. Test your iMac in Safe Mode Follow these steps to boot your iMac into Safe Mode: Fully shut down your iMac ...


2

Resetting the PRAM works the same way it always did. This is a function of the hardware - not the OS. What makes you think it doesn't work anymore? (tested on Macbook, Mac Mini).


2

Not sure if this is too late of an answer. I know you've already attempted to disable the password, but try these steps exactly: You can remove the firmware password by changing the RAM configuration, booting up to the startup menu, shutting down and changing it back. Basically, if you have two 1GB chips of RAM in there now, you can remove one of the chips, ...


2

Modern Macintosh computers store very little information in PRAM so resetting it is seldom a useful troubleshooting step. Have you checked the condition of the battery using System Information? (It's in the Utilities folder and also accessible from the menu: [Apple] > About this Mac > More Info… > System Report —assuming you're running Lion) If you're ...


2

Yes, PRAM is stored on the same NVRAM chip as the firmware variables, but it is managed separately. It actually shows up as a device in the firmware device tree. HT1242: What's stored in PRAM When you reset one, you reset the other. HT1379: Resetting your Mac's PRAM and NVRAM AFAIK, Apple has never supported direct developer access to PRAM, so it is not ...


2

This means that a Firmware Password has been set on that Mac. A simple way to disable this is to remove some RAM and restart. Shutdown, replace the RAM, and the Firmware Password will be disabled. This is the Firmware Password prompt:


2

There is a simple way to find out who is the owner of the computer as reported to Find my Mac. In terminal use nvram -p | grep fmm If it is your name there then you are fine.


2

AFAIK, there is no way to clear a serial intentionally or by accident. The only way to get a blank system serial number is when the logic board is replaced. Replacement MLB only comes with a part serial number but it does not have a system serial number. I assume that you took your laptop to have it repaired? When a new logic board is replaced by Apple or ...


2

I have had the same problem with the huge "folders". The command looks like a quick way to go and I'll try this out next time I get the big files appearing. I manage over 400 macs and this issue has been happening since 10.9 through 10.10 and now it seems 10.11. The strange thing is that it is only apparent on a certain model of iMac, 2GHZ Intel Core 2 Duo, ...


2

I had the same problem, I think. But my files were still in the finder under 'Desktop', just not on the actual desktop. After trying a few of the above, I second-clicked the desktop and hit 'Clean up', and they all reappeared. So the simplest of all helped for me.


2

The Apple Store Genius quickly resolved the issue by doing an SMC reset and NVRAM reset in rapid succession. (He may have done more than one of each; I'm not sure. I don't think he waited for an audible startup chime before adding the NVRAM step. It was a 5-minute visit and the store was loud.) So if this state recurs, I'll try each of those in order, in ...


2

Go to System Preferences > Keyboard Check the box Show keyboard and emoji viewers in menu bar In the menu bar click Show keyboard viewer This will show you which keys are being pressed and will hopefully help you to answer your question...


2

This is a side-effect of the implementation. Setting the AutoBoot NVRAM variable doesn't actually prevent the machine from booting. The machine will still boot automatically when the lid is opened, or on the first power button press, but will only boot to a page with a battery icon. Until the machine shuts down again (by itself after a little while, or by ...


2

As you may know, the Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM) and System Management Controller (SMC) have totally different purposes. In terms of the red light you're referring to: resetting the NVRAM will have absolutely no bearing on this whatsoever resetting the SMC could have an influence, but probably not in the way you're asking about. At its core the SMC is ...


2

I bought an iMac from a colleague - he wiped it completely and it was in the power up install process choose language. Then as I continued the normal install it stopped as it thought it was stolen... The serial number is checked against Apple ID’s and as it was still listed against my colleagues Apple ID it refused to continue... Once my colleague removed ...


1

I had the same problem on El Capitan (MacOS 10.11). I managed to get the Terminal app started and noticed that "lsd" (LaunchServiceDaemon) was using 100% of one core. The fix was to rebuild the Launch Services database with the command in this Apple discussion thread.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible