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25

The accepted answer only works when the NFS server allows connections on non-reserved ports (i.e. >1024). The exports man pages say it: exportfs understands the following export options: secure This option requires that requests originate on an Internet port less than IPPORT_RESERVED (1024). This option is on by default. To turn it off, specify ...


13

nfsd is invoked by launchd while booting by the accompanying com.apple.nfsd.plist file in /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/. As you can see close to the bottom of the following picture, it's only kept alive, when /etc/exports exists. If the path doesn't exist, nfsd will not run. So removing /etc/exports will disable nfsd temporarily until the path is ...


13

In Finder, press cmd + k and enter the path to the NFS server/share: For me this mounted as /Volumes/users-1 (but I already had /Volumes/Users mounted). iMac21:~ user$ df -h /Volumes/users-1 Filesystem Size Used Avail Capacity iused ifree %iused Mounted on 192.168.7.5:/nas/users 5.4Ti 4.8Ti 292Gi 95% 261121 366027775 0% /...


11

Hmmm, seems we need to have this question re-answered every major release of OS X. So I can only say this works on 10.10.x :) From OS X's man page for mount_nfs "nfs.conf(5) can be used to configure some NFS client options. In particular, nfs.client.mount.options can be used to specify default mount options" To get the Finder to default to using NFS v4 ...


11

I've been interested in this question since Nov 2012 and even set up a FreeNAS VM to reproduce the issue. I eventually gave up but since the question has been resuscitated I will share what I found out back then and in the last hours (luckily I didn't delete the VM) and what I think the cause for this issue is. I have also found a workaround. My setup ...


10

I have spent quite a bit of time figuring out automounts of NFS shares in OS X... Somewhere along the line, Apple decided allowing mounts directly into /Volumes should not be possible: /etc/auto_master (see last line): # # Automounter master map # +auto_master # Use directory service /net -hosts -nobrowse,hidefromfinder,nosuid /home ...


10

Why do you have to? Tradition, mostly. Once upon a time, restricting NFS to privileged ports (<1023) was considered a security measure. Back when people were using mainframe computers, this made sure that the NFS software on the client side was part of the OS/approved by the administrator, since a program can only use a privileged port if it's run by the ...


10

As mentioned by another user on StackOverflow, you can use an NFS mount do to this. However, it requires a little bit of one-time setup. First, you'll need to set up an /etc/exports file (if you haven't done so already). $ sudo tee -a /etc/exports <<< "/ -alldirs -mapall=$USER localhost" Secondly, you'll need to start the rpc and nfsd services. $...


10

There is another option - bindfs. It requires you to install FUSE but provides an alternative to using NFS. You may need to compile from source but I see it's available in MacPorts too.


10

What was required was the following line in /etc/exports: /path/to/shared/dir -mapall=<uid of local user on host machine with correct perms> -network 192.168.56.0 -mask 255.255.255.0 exports(5) is the FreeBSD version, obviously. Once I did some googling for the solution with respect to "FreeBSD" instead of "Mac", the necessary information presented ...


7

macOS Server is not required at all to share directories over NFS. The macOS client provides all necessary tools. Testing various exports with bogus paths, I'd assume your path simply doesn't exist. The most convenient GUI-tool for NFS is NFS Manager. You will be presented with a nag-screen launching it or changing configurations, but it works without ...


6

The user and group information on a Mac are stored in Directory Services. That service can bind to external sources and alternate "local" sources like NFS, LDAP, ActiveDirectory (LDAP) but by default, unless you opt in to a directory - the user and group database is locally managed. You can find the default local files in /private/var/db/dslocal/nodes/...


5

A late answer, for posterity and the desperate searcher. The GUI has been moved more or less to Directory Utility, which can be found in /Volumes/[name of your harddrive]/System/Library/CoreServices/Applications. Use -shift-G if you are lost to find your way. Open Directory Utility and click on the Directory Editor (third) icon. Select "Mounts" from the ...


5

In order to mount an NFS share as a client, you need essentially two things: The name or IP address of the server, referred to as DNSName The share path How do you find this stuff out? This assumes you don't know what the share paths are. If you already know, skip down to "Connecting" Using my own personal Synology Diskstation as an example, I have ...


5

._ Desktop and ._Library contain extended attributes for these directories. This StackOverflow question describes roughly what generic ._ files are. if for file foo you have another ._foo, and you're on a Mac, the dot-underscore file is where the file resource fork / metadata is kept. As to why directories like Desktop or Library would need extended ...


4

I'm running into the same problem than @ndejay but the cause may differ sightly. I'm using NFSv3 and my Autofs maps were working on OS X 10.5 to 10.8 : /mnt -fstype=nfs,nfsvers=3,proto=tcp,resvport myserver:/share On Mavericks it works only from the command line : mount -t nfs -o nfsvers=3,proto=tcp,resvport myserver:/share /mnt With a little debugging ...


4

If you try default /etc/auto_master file, you can see line /net -hosts -nobrowse,hidefromfinder,nosuid Then you can cd /net/host/exported/path and found that mac tries to mount this exported path.


4

Unfortunately the NFS GUI tools have been removed from disk utility in Mavericks. However the NFS manager tool ( www.bresink.com/osx/NFSManager.html) can replace that functionality and provide even more fine grained control than disk utility's implementation did. If you want this NFS mount to remain mounted persistently you can also use automounter which ...


4

The primary issue I see with your command: exec open -a "/path/to/nfs/"Sublime\ Text.app" "$@" Is you have used a backslash to escape a space while also quoting the command. Use one or the other, but not both, e.g.: open -a "/path/to/nfs/Sublime Text.app" Or: open -a /path/to/nfs/Sublime\ Text.app I also see no reason to use exec when the open command ...


4

The version of nfsd on the Mac does support v4. For ACL support you definitely need to connect using v4. Your failure to get a v4 connection is probably on the client side. Most NFS clients default to trying v3 first then falling back to v2 if unsuccessful. On your client side you should specify v4 using the -o vers=4 option to your mount command. Do a man ...


3

I found that the automountd service wasn't loaded on my machine (running 10.10 Yosemite). $ sudo launchctl list | grep -i auto 84878 0 com.apple.autofsd - 0 com.apple.preferences.timezone.auto - 0 com.apple.automountd Restarting autofsd and automountd and then rerunning automount -vc has made it work. sudo launchctl unload /System/Library/...


3

Or just use the "resvport" option with the mount command. mount -o resvport nasbox.local.com:/try /mnt


3

I have spent quite a bit of time figuring out automounts of NFS shares in OS X... Somewhere along the line, Apple decided allowing mounts directly into /Volumes should not be possible: /etc/auto_master (see last line): # # Automounter master map # +auto_master # Use directory service /net -hosts -nobrowse,hidefromfinder,nosuid /home ...


3

OK - I found here https://discussions.apple.com/message/21199204#message21199204 the answer. I quote: After much reading I learn't there are multiple ways to construct the same unicode character, and so for efficient comparision there is a concept called normalisation ( http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr15/ ). After normalising with the same ...


3

Apparently, I had some issues with my /etc/hosts file. The suspicion was alert seeing rpc.lockd[215] : can't contact statd, 100024 RPC: Timed out all over. I cleaned up the /etc/hosts file: ## # Host Database # # localhost is used to configure the loopback interface # when the system is booting. Do not change this entry. ## 127.0.0.1 localhost 255.255....


2

I had stale files in Finder when I used noac,nonegnamecache in the NFS mount options on Yosemite. Removing those options fixed the problem. Instead of noac (which is equivalent to actimeo=0), I added actimeo=1 to set the attribute cache timeout to 1 second. I'd prefer if the attribute cache was disabled completely, but this way at least the timeout is low.


2

I had the same problem and found a solution here that worked for me: dscacheutil -flushcache killall Finder The man page of dscacheutil says that the -flushcache option should only be used in extreme cases, so there may be risks to this method that I'm not aware of.


2

If you're explicitly looking to make a copy of the existing backups (a backup of the backups), you will need to make a disk image with Disk Utility. Time Machine uses hardlinked directories which are only supported by HFS+, so you need HFS+ in a container. You'd be much better off running netatalk on the Ubuntu server, which will share the disk over AFP, ...


2

Very late answer, but you should add nfc to /etc/nfs.conf nfs.client.mount.options=nfc man mount_nfs for details of the options.


2

Using autofs, as suggested by others is probably the way to go. Most of what follows works in El Capitan, which made auto mounting more difficult, but it should apply to Mavericks too. I do not have a Mavericks system to test. In order to make this work edit /etc/auto_master and add the following line: /- auto_nfs -nobrowse,nosuid Then create ...


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