189

The iStats ruby gem lets you see the CPU temperature via the command-line. Installation $ gem install iStats Usage $ istats


29

On BSD systems, the sysctl utility can provides similar information as the /proc tree in Linux. It actually report some CPU/GPU temperature information from Xnu CPU Power Management (XCPM): sysctl machdep.xcpm.cpu_thermal_level sysctl machdep.xcpm.gpu_thermal_level However this doesn't seem to be a temperature reading but only an indication of the ...


24

This open source command line utility worked for me: https://github.com/lavoiesl/osx-cpu-temp.


19

Update: @PressingOnAlways has notified me that this software is now considered legacy by its developer. Further details on the stopped support can be found on their legacy-software website. Assuming you installed it in /Applications you'd need to run the following: /Applications/TemperatureMonitor.app/Contents/MacOS/tempmonitor -c -l -a Site: Temperature ...


14

As of Mavericks, this is provided by the OS. Activity monitor has a tab devoted to displaying the energy use of running (and recently running) apps. Also, the battery icon shows applications that use significant energy on Mavericks and newer.


13

The most full featured way to peek into web traffic is to install and configure your system to use a web proxy. The mitmproxy proxy (and mitmdump tool) is mature, reliable and well documented so I would start there unless you have another that meets your specific needs. Also, widely and well regarded is https://www.charlesproxy.com


10

Yes (maybe). There's an open-source kernel driver OS-X-SAT-SMART-Driver for Mac OS X that will work for some USB and Firewire enclosures. It uses SAT (SCSI ATA Translation) to pass the SMART commands through to the hard drive, so only works if your enclosure supports SAT. SAT isn't something enclosures seem to advertise support for, but the one I use (WD ...


10

Sounds like you need a packet sniffer. Wireshark will log and do full disassembly on all traffic going through your network interface. In other words, it will not just show you the full URLs of each request, but it will let you look inside all the packets, so you can see the headers and content too (except in SSL connections, as they are encrypted). It ...


8

Little Snitch Whilst it's mainly a firewall, it alerts you when an app connects to a certain domain, and lets you allow/block the connection. Alternatively, you can allow all connections and just monitor them. Rubbernet Rubbernet is also a good alternative, providing the additional feature of remote monitoring of Macs on a network.


7

Another app I've used is RubbertNet. Also not free, but has a free trial available.


6

The app Little Snitch can do this. Among many other things, it shows traffic by app. It costs $29, but there is a free trial available.


6

Like Linux, OS X is designed not to require restarting. There is no system wide means to determine if a restart is required - or even requested by a process. For situations where a restart is required, the process responsible for needing the restart is also responsible for organising the restart. Tools that update OS X are most likely to request a restart. ...


5

A combination of HandsOff! and SurplusMeter is my current solution. HandsOff is an advanced firewall which similar to LittleSnitch. It's not free, but a trial version is available. Surplusmeter on the other hand is free and open source. Among the features which you need for monitoring network usage are: monitoring network activity of every process (...


4

You could just use the built-in sandboxing features of Mac OS X. Create a custom profile that limits access to the SystemVersion.plist file, using syntax like this: (version 1) (deny file* (literal "/System/Library/CoreServices/SystemVersion.plist")) (allow default) Save that as for example ~/myprofile.sb and then run your program like this: sandbox-exec ...


4

In order to get accurate processes, cpu usage and accumulative time, the user running htop should be root. This is not the case with top, because it has the "set-user-ID-on-execution bit" (suid) set. Execute sudo htop from your user terminal or if you trust your local users add the suid to the binary (# chmod u+s path-to-htop-binary).


4

Since your comment mentions that you're really just focused on enabling Terminal (or more accurately not desktop)... I think that the Intel Power Gadget will help you get your info from Terminal. From Intel: Intel® Power Gadget also provides a C/C++ Application Programming Interface (API) for accessing this power and frequency data in your program; the ...


3

Little Snitch A firewall that can alert you when an app connects to a certain domain, and lets you allow/block the connection. Alternatively, you can allow all connections and just monitor them. Rubbernet Alternatively, you can use Rubbernet:


3

iStat Menus let's you monitor your current computer power usage. Unfortunately, it does not break it down by app.


3

Whilst it won't give you the full URL, if you're a fan of the command line, then iftop also comes in quite handy and shows you both incoming and outgoing hosts, port numbers (names for well known ports) and cumulative totals for each - as well as live updating "graphs" on the command line :-)


3

How about something simple in your crontab? @daily (date; df)>> ~/drive_usage.log Which will, on a daily basis, append to the file drive_usage.log in your home directory with the date and time the job ran. Change @daily to @hourly or @weekly if you want different sampling rates. Sample output: Thu 13 Feb 2014 22:15:22 GMT Filesystem ...


3

Munin is available for Mac OS X. It is server monitoring software and one of the things it monitors is disk space usage. Munin Mac install docs here. (Yes, this is a rather heavyweight solution, but you get graphing! :)


3

I am not saying you are wrong, but the GPU memory is normally used for rendering the current laptop 2D display, and then for the calculations for 3D display (games), and GPU acceleration (modern browsers). I've used, programmed various computers for many years, and yet to see an issue related to an application using to much GPU memory. But ISTRC MBP from ...


3

The WiFi on your MBP is, by design, supposed to reconnect to known networks automatically without the intervention of the user and/or an automated script. That said, WiFi issues seem to have been an ongoing issue for Apple: How do I connect my Mac to wifi automatically? Now, I am assuming that this is a simple home network where you just have to select ...


3

Instruments is a tool that comes with Xcode. This tool was designed to help developers get a lot of detail about what was happening on a computer when their software is run. One of the things it can do is watch all file I/O. If you run the program and add the File I/O instrument, you can attach it to safari and see what happens. You can also filter and ...


3

If I understand you correctly, you can access the output of your scripts. Then you can do something like this: #!/bin/bash # Replace the echo with your script echo "space cats" | grep "space cats" if [[ "$?" -eq "0" ]]; then osascript -e 'display notification "Attention!" with title "Notification" subtitle "I found space cats" sound name "Submarine"' ...


2

Rather than wireshark, try using a http proxy, like fiddler2. Then save the Rss content to a file, and load it into a browser, like firefox. Then you'll have to visually diff the two views of the RSS feed.


2

Put a switch which can have ports configured in "span" mode so you can sniff all the traffic, (an old hub will also do the same job) between the router and the base station. Plug in your laptop, install wireshark and sniff all the traffic. Then analyse. The other tool I use is MRTG, but you will need to set up SNMP on the Airport or the "spanned" switch, ...


2

Yes - it would be more efficient to tail -f the log file so that your script only has to parse each line in the file once rather an once per interval. Of course, you then still need to write and test the code to monitor for times when the logfile gets rotated and perhaps double check at you didn't miss an event by scanning the entire new file once when you ...


2

Use tail -f on the file. That will constantly update in the current window.


2

There is no way those temp are in Celsius. Your 194 F = 94 C ! The Intel specification for maximum operating temp is 110 dgr Celsius. Once that temp is reached the build in self protection kicks in and reduces the power. So the CPU will self protect from melting. However, since your fans are running at full speed, it is getting hot in there. You might ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible