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Maxing out the RAM and replacing the HDD with an SSD will certainly bring improvements. According to EveryMac, it can run High Sierra 10.13.6. This may well be sufficient for web browsing and email. However, once the OS becomes a few years old, you will start to run into compatibility problems. Also, the Core 2 Duo is a very old CPU technology, and it may ...


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Whether it's 'worth it' will be up to you. You can get 16GB RAM in there & you can swap the HD to an SSD. The SSD will feel like day after night compared to an HD - especially as you're on an OS that is designed for SSD & almost forgets spinning rust ever played a part. You will be bound to 10.13 so you might not need more RAM unless you’re ...


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You’re more likely to benefit from extra RAM, and that model of iMac can take up to 16GB — 4GB is very low for modern MacOS versions. I am running a late 2009 i7 27” iMac, but I have 20GB of RAM and a hybrid drive in it.


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Crucial.com shows it being PC4-21300 so I would ignore Amazon. See https://www.crucial.com/usa/en/compatible-upgrade-for/Apple/imac-%28retina-5k%2C-27-inch-3*0ghz-intel-core-i5%2C-2019%29#MEMORYFilters


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Quick follow up if anyone else runs into this. The mid-2010 iMac i3 processor can’t handle 8GB sticks. It can only do up to 4GB/slot. Only the i5 & i7 versions of the mid-2010 iMac can handle 8GB sticks. Upgrading the processor and ram on my 2010, and tried 2 x 8GB (16GB) with the i3 and had the same issues as OP. With the i7, I can max out at 4 x ...


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You could get a 3rd party app like System Pal or iStat. Both apps reside in the menu bar and tell you things like memory used and CPU usage. You can easily monitor either of these apps. I prefer System Pal to monitor memory and CPU usage. It just gives the top processes. Another option is to use "top" or "htop" from the command line. These processes are ...


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On one system, before you install the update - enable caching in the sharing preference pane. Save the cache files to an external drive - speed there isn’t much of a limiting factor since the downloads stream well and any recent hard drive or SSD will be almost as fast as the network can serve files. Then the first machine to do the download will get the ...


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I have a student who has one of those MacBooks and we upgraded the RAM to 16GB of 1066MHz DDR3 last year. A quick check on Amazon shows the price has come down to be half of what it was when she did that (~$55 for 16GB, on the US site). I doubt you're going to see any serious performance gains with faster RAM. (The bottleneck is that machine's age.) And, ...


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The people at OWC do this sort of thing on a common basis -- test to see what combinations of memory will work. If I've figured your mac correctly, this page: https://eshop.macsales.com/shop/memory/Apple_MacBook_MacBook_Pro/Upgrade/DDR3_White says that the most you can have is 2 8GB sticks. Haven't done it, so take this with a grain of salt, but most of ...


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Apple says: RAM is not user-installable on Mac mini (2018) While I do not know what this means in terms of voiding the warranty… Apple does not consider the RAM in a Mac mini (2018) to be user-installable. The Apple Support page Upgrade or install memory in your Mac mini says: 2018 Mac mini (2018) does not have user-installable RAM. You can ...


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Yes, you can mix them. There are 4 slots, so you can keep the Apple RAM, even if it's in 2 slots. According to the reliable EveryMac, your Mac can take up to 128Gb !!


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As you have read, this is down to memory management. iOS will remove background tabs from memory when that memory is required for something else. The device you're using is more significant than the version of iOS. An iPhone 6 with 1GB of RAM will close tabs more aggressively than an XS with 4GB. As others have mentioned in the comments, iOS keeps a ...


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There is no problem. Your computer is working as intended. A computer does not “run faster” by using more memory. Memory is only used (allocated) when programs ask for memory. If they don’t ask for it, it’s not used. This is the preferred behavior as it makes your computer run faster and use less power without sacrificing anything really. There’s no “8 GB ...


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You should search for info about your mac on Everymac.com. I searched there for your mac and assuming I did it right I found this brief comment. Apple officially supports a maximum of 4 GB of RAM, but third-parties have determined that it actually supports 8 GB of RAM running Mac OS X 10.6 "Snow Leopard" and 16 GB of RAM running OS X 10.7.5 "Lion" or ...


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