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43

You can safely use the 85W adapter on any Mac, it will only draw as much power as it needs. The 45W adapter from the MacBook Air may just about manage to power your MacBook Pro but it won't charge it. It will not damage your Mac, but you may notice the battery may still deplete when using it. Here is the information, straight from Apple:


21

Sounds like you got a sticking ground pin. Just plug it out when connecting to the laptop horizontally (with more force) and stick it back it horizontally as well. Usually this is due to you removing the plug by lifting it (feels gentle but actually bad) rather than yanking it.


21

You don't want to mix those two. Why? Because the USB-C port conforms to the USB 3.1 Power Delivery Specification whereas the Magsafe charger does not. Part of that specification includes the negotiation of delivered power. The Magsafe will not negotiate how much power is supplied. What it's looking for is the presence of the 1 wire charging circuit ...


16

The ElecJet Anywatt One fills this need, for the purpose of powering a USB-C device from a MagSafe power supply. From the product page: Anywatt built-in self-developed LDR6032 smart chip supports the latest USB C Power Delivery & PPS protocol, Automatically recognize the end device needed power and adapt the voltage and current to best suit the end ...


14

Start with a pencil eraser or small wooden dowel / tool to gently dislodge the debris. As the magnets are very strong, you may need to use tape with a strong adhesive to grab the foreign material. Clear packing tape strikes a good balance between not leaving residue and getting the crud out. Duct tape also is nice, but a bit more sticky and may grab the ...


13

You can turn it into an approximation of an L or even a U by the simple expedient of tying a knot in it. This is my standard way of dealing with any awkward cable. It's not perfect, but boy, it's cheap ;-) L-knot U-knot From comments - the U-knot is achieved by simply wrapping one end through a second time, if it's not clear from the picture. BTW - keep ...


12

You have 2 scenarios as I see it: 1) Using a higher rated power supply than the original unit. This is absolutely fine. The power supply will never just automatically run at 100 % of it's capability, it will only supply what is requested. If you use a MacBook air that is supplied with a 45 W adapter with an 85 W adapter instead, it will still only draw ...


10

Some obvious causes: Need to wait 30 to 60 seconds for the SMC to read the battery and decide what to do check for pencil lead/debris on the mac end of the magsafe check for pins stuck down on the magsafe cord end of things The SMC needs to be reset on the Mac The battery, all adapter or charging circuitry itself is faulty or detecting something that causes ...


8

Because you explain the problem perfectly, and in short: The battery does not charge, and your Macbook does only work with MagSafe attached There's only one option what could be the problem... The battery is dead, let me explain you why: Your battery is ignored somehow, and your Macbook uses power directly from the MagSafe adapter. If you couldn't even ...


7

Here's the solution I used to clean out metal fragments in my connector socket: Use Blu-Tack or Sticky Tack! This cleans out the connector socket almost immediately and it took less than a penny's worth of tack! Just roll it around in the connector and it'll work fine :)


7

When measuring the usage of power adapters, it is important to keep in mind the efficiency of the PSU when making calculations. For PC builders, it's important to ensure that you choose a suitable PSU for the components you intend to use, to ensure it's big enough etc. As such, the rated capacity is shown as what the PSU is capable of delivering, rather ...


7

Electrically yes, physically not without an adapter. Only the physical layout of the pins and metal end that connects to the Air is different. However, with the MagSafe to MagSafe 2 Adaptor ($10) lets any original sized MagSafe adapter slim down to work with the new thinner Mac-side of the MagSafe 2 connection.


7

There is a product that also can help with this. http://www.snuglet.com It works by using a tiny machined piece of metal inside of the port on the computer to strengthen the connection of the magsafe 2 connector.


7

The iron / ferric portions of the MagSafe port is something that will corrode when exposed to oxygen. The quality of your pictures is excellent and all are operationally normal and safe since the 5 central pins are clear, not corroded and not obstructed. You do have a pretty severe amount of corrosion, so that might implicate the environment having salts ...


6

Troubleshooting MagSafe adapters Whether your product is in or out of warranty, you can take your adapter to an Apple Authorized Service Provider or Apple Retail Store for evaluation and replacement if necessary. Pending the results of the evaluation, you may or may not be eligible for a replacement adapter free of charge. Signs of accidental damage would ...


6

From Apple's Support site: http://support.apple.com/kb/TS1713 If your MagSafe connectors requires cleaning: To clean the DC plug on either the computer or the power adapter, disconnect the adapter from the wall outlet and/or remove the battery from the computer. Remove debris gently with a cotton swab or a soft bristle toothbrush, which ...


5

The MagSafe power adapter, like nearly all power adapters for modern electronic equipment, is a switching (switched-mode) power supply. Switching power supplies achieve their light weight and small size by using smaller, lighter transformers for voltage conversion, which require high-frequency AC input to operate. This high-frequency input is produced by a ...


5

The way Apple power adapters are designed is that you can use any charger on any laptop that has the same, or lower, power rating. For example, you can safely use an 85W power adapter (for MacBook Pro) on a MacBook Air (which requires only 45W) or MacBook (which requires 65W). However this does not work the other way around, you cannot use a MacBook Air (...


5

I am surprised that no one has noticed the attempt to power a device who's stated power requirements is "14.5 Volts DC at 3.05 Amperes" (The MacBook Air) with a 20 Volts (!!) DC 85 Watts power adapter. Yes, I agree, there is nothing wrong with using a higher wattage than the original power adapter for powering the MacBook Air, but it has to be at least very ...


5

The MagSafe board is a very easy repair for someone who has patience and a small amount of training fixing any computer at all. The MacBook Pro aren't as fidgety to repair as the iMac and MacBook Air (where I would say you should be a skilled technician with official training materials available to work on them reliably). You're looking to replace this with ...


5

Apple themselves states that it is safe and okay to use a higher power cord on a laptop even if it only requires a lower power one: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2346 The power requirement for your computer really is just a "minimum" power requirement. If you can even call it that. Because they'll actually charge even on lower powered cords, but it will be ...


5

A good description can be found at Teardown and exploration of Apple's Magsafe connector Below is taken verbatim from the above link. The charger startup process When the Magsafe connector is plugged into a Mac, a lot more happens than you might expect. I believe the following steps take place: The charger provides a very low current (about 100 µA) 6 ...


4

I used chewing gum to get the metal pieces out. That was the only resource I had at hand at the time, and it worked like magic!


4

Once I got small pieces of iron stuck in the port - none of the magnets we had were stronger than the one in the port. We couldn't flick them out with a clean paintbrush and the hole was too small to put fingernails in. We ended up getting it out with blue tack!


4

Yes - an 85 W magsafe adapter is an 85 W magsafe adapter no matter what the end cord arrangement. The newer adapters have a thin barrel more like the 45 W macbook air barrel style adapters first required due to the limited space where it connected. The heat and burning smell could be a safety issue (especially if your sniffer isn't very sentitive) - have ...


4

It is common for the Macs battery to stop charging around 93-98%. It does it to prolong the overall life of the battery. Plus, your battery will have some wear and tear now depending on how many charge cycles you have used up. http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1446#Troubleshooting But if your MagSafe adapter is charging to 98% consistently and the off brand ...


4

Historically, Macs have been known to have various issues - including not starting up - when the PRAM battery has died. Later MacBooks (including yours AFAIK) use the main battery for PRAM and SMC memory retention rather than having a separate battery for this purpose. Replacing the battery should clear startup and charging issues.


4

There are three axes to consider when measuring the force needed to separate a MagSafe 2. There are two great articles that cover the basics: http://www.macworld.com/article/2895694/will-your-new-macbook-crash-to-the-ground-without-magsafe-yes.html http://leancrew.com/all-this/2015/03/slippin-and-a-slidin/ The MagSafe 2 is quite strong if you have a ...


4

Yes - lightning carries decent amount of power. Crossed wires could short out a device. MagSafe - worse - more power, less room for error. The only upside there is the MagSafe in side of things is a bit more robust since it handles more power and if you blow the MagSafe on the Mac, it's a relatively inexpensive repair. Fixing the phone connector would be ...


4

The adapter that you should get is the 60W Magsafe with "T" Connector. From Apple's Support site: That said, I would get an Apple 85W adapter instead of the 60W. You will have more versatility if you decide to upgrade your MacBook to a different model down the road. You won't do any damage, 85W just means that's the maximum power draw the adapter will ...


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