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The Mac Pro is a workstation computer manufactured by Apple Inc.. The first Mac Pro was based on dual Dual-core Xeon Woodcrest processors and formally announced on August 7, 2006 at WWDC. The current model Mac Pro was announced on December 19, 2013 and features Intel Xeon processors and AMD FirePro Graphics.

The Mac Pro is a workstation computer manufactured by Apple Inc. The machines are based on Xeon microprocessors, but are similar to the Power Mac G5 they replaced in terms of outward appearance and expansion capabilities. The Mac Pro, in most configurations, is the fastest computer that Apple offers, and one of three desktop computers in the current Macintosh lineup; the iMac and Mac Mini round up the list.

The first Mac Pro was based on dual Dual-core Xeon Woodcrest processors and formally announced on August 7, 2006 at WWDC. A new Intel Xeon-based Xserve was announced along with the Mac Pro, completing Apple's transition from the PowerPC to x86 architecture.

On April 4, 2007, a dual Quad-core Xeon Clovertown model was launched. It was replaced on January 8, 2008 by a dual Quad-core Xeon Harpertown model. This was followed by two more tower-style models launched in 2009 and 2010, featuring Intel Xeon processors based on the Nehalem and Westmere microarchitectures. The 2010 tower model had options of up to 12 processing cores, up to four optional 2TB hard disk drives/512GB solid state drives and ATI Radeon HD 5770/5870 graphics.

Apple's current Mac Pro, known as the 2nd generation Mac Pro, was released December 19, 2013, following an introduction at WWDC earlier that year. The new Mac Pro is shaped like a cylinder, and features up to a single 12-core 2.7Ghz Ivy Bridge processor, up to 64GB of 1866Mhz DDR3 ECC RAM, and graphics options up to dual AMD FirePro D700s with 6GB of VRAM each, and PCIe flash storage up to 1TB. This machine is the only one in Apple's current lineup to be manufactured in the United States.

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