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18

IPv6 used to be derived of the MAC address of your device. This is the Modified EUI-64 format. Such addresses are recognisable by looking at the middle of the last 64 bits. If they contain ..ff:fe.. then it is probably a EUI-64 based address. Because the algorithm produces the same 64 bits every time some people were afraid that it would become easy to ...


9

The problem was with the OSX version of rsync. I don't know exactly what is the problem. It should be some of capabilities of rsync binary/version. OSX version: /usr/bin/rsync --version rsync version 2.6.9 protocol version 29 ... Capabilities: 64-bit files, socketpairs, hard links, symlinks, batchfiles, inplace, IPv6, 64-bit system inums, ...


8

Actually yes it does have a DHCPv6 client. I have verified in 10.8.4 but the email thread referenced above talks about it working with Lion too. To get it to work, you need to set the IPv6 configuration to "automatic" and then on your router, you also need to configure the routing announcements to indicate that hosts should use DHCP to obtain an address. I ...


7

The feature is not supported on macOS. Depending on how many IP addresses you want to listen to, you could use a simple script to bind each IP-address to the interface individually using the ifconfig alias command.


7

Currently OS X does not have a DHCPv6 client built in. Note that in OS X the IPv4 configuration gives you a choice of manual, DHCP, DHCP with manual DNS, BOOTP, or off. The IPv6 choices are manual, automatic, link-local, and off. The "Automatic" is not DHCP, it's autoconfig from a router. With IPv6, there are multiple ways to get an address. OS X doesn't ...


6

This was a huge hassle to figure out, so I wrote up a little guide in hopes that others would find it helpful: How to convince macOS to do IPv6 DNS lookups when your only IPv6 address is via a VPN or tunnel of some sort The Problem macOS's domain name resolver will only return IPv6 addresses (from AAAA records) when it thinks that you have a valid ...


5

Mac OS X has definitely DHCPv6 support. I currently use ISC-DHCPD in combination with radvd on my Raspberry Pi as home Router. It is important that the M and the O Flag are set for route advertisement. That instructs to "switch" to DHCPv6. Radvd then advertises the default route (because, providing the route via DHCPv6 is currently not defined as a final ...


4

Because not setting up your network card to use ipv6 does not prevent applications of opening such sockets. The sockets displayed as *.<port> are not bound to specific ip addresses/interfaces of your machine. They will simply listen to any incoming connection on any interface. Of course, no ipv6 connections will come in through your ethernet card if ...


4

To output only IPv6 info, use the -f address_family option. Example: netstat -nr -f inet6 From the netstat man page: −f address_family Limit statistics or address control block reports to those of the specified address family. The following address families are recognized: inet, for AF_INET, inet6, for AF_INET6 and unix, for AF_UNIX.


3

There hasn't been any documentation made available for this feature (so no information on how the addresses are generated), which is indeed new in Sierra, nor can it be disabled. Apple announced this feature at WWDC 2016. Essentially Apple is generating IPv6 addresses that are unrelated to the MAC address in order to prevent tracking of users based on MAC ...


3

Addresses starting with 169.254 are called APIPA or link-local addresses. It's what your interface automatically gets when the DHCP client is enabled but no DHCP server can be found. They are not usable to connect to the internet. Don't worry, it seems that your test environment is IPv6-only.


3

When you want to connect to an unroutable address like link-local you need to specify the interface. This is because for unroutable addresses your system can't determine the outgoing interface by looking at the routing table. Unroutable destinations include link-local addresses (fe80::) and link-local multicast (ff02::) and more.


3

You can disable IPv4 in your OS and adding some public DNS64/NAT64-Resolver. You can create your own IPv6-only-environment: Apple has prepared such an environment for testing purposes. https://developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/ios/documentation/NetworkingInternetWeb/Conceptual/NetworkingOverview/UnderstandingandPreparingfortheIPv6Transition/...


3

You probably already read did-you-realize-apples-back-to-my-mac-mobileme-service-uses-ipv6 by now. It has some of the answers. Also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KAME_project I don't know how much was changed since MobileMe became iCloud. lsof -i:4500 Shows that the process 'racoon' is handling the tunnel. This port is also opened on the router. I wonder ...


2

A possibility The lack of progress, beyond the firewall-related message, may be unrelated to the firewall or networking. For example, these two lines from Intel Mac Pro Stuck on Gray Apple screen before OS load (2010-07-17): IPv6 packet filtering initialized, default to accept, logging disabled Jul 15 22:08:39 kextd[25]: kextd_watch_volumes: Couldn't set ...


2

This isn't just a Terminal thing, this is an OS X selection thing. Anywhere in OS X where auto-range selection works, it will select an IPv4 in that way. As far as I am aware, there is no way to customize this as it is part of the OS.


2

Try turning IPv6 off before connecting to the Wi-Fi. Turn the AirPort off, go to System Preferences, Network, AirPort, Advanced, TCP/IP, Configure IPv6: Off. Then turn the AirPort on, and everything should work fine.


2

This was a huge hassle to figure out, so I wrote up a little guide in hopes that others would find it helpful: How to convince macOS to do IPv6 DNS lookups when your only IPv6 address is via a VPN or tunnel of some sort The Problem macOS's domain name resolver will only return IPv6 addresses (from AAAA records) when it thinks that you have a valid ...


2

Your system does have an IPv6 address though it's not really usable for networking beyond the local subnet. fe80::1c00:23f2:b82e:fc8c is a fe80::/10 link-local unicast address Link-Local addresses are designed to be used for addressing on a single link for purposes such as automatic address configuration, neighbor discovery, or when no routers are ...


2

At least one network interface has to include a IPv6 addressed DNS server. That sets the AAAA flag, and then the Mac OS will resolve IPv6 addresses.


2

Short answer: because the "secure" address is not secure enough. Specifically, it's still a long-term identifier for your computer until/unless you move it to a different network. Long answer: When a host is configured via SLAAC, that provides a 64-bit prefix for the host's public IPv6 address(es); the host then has three main ways to choose suffix(...


1

That's a sneaky one - I'm sure you looked into the Airport Utility configuration. Tried to assign a static IPv6 to it? Fiddle with IPv6 DNS& share setting. I don't know if there is a way to turn off the RA - since they are supposed to "maintain" network quality, and this is a connect&forget device so maybe that's a default and it's fixed. I dont ...


1

No - iOS has no profile or setting to disable IPv6. Even if you jailbreak, I don't know how to set that on iOS operating systems. Yes I am also using a Hurricane Electric tunnel for IPv6. I have similar problems with my two iMac computers. I have to set my IPv6 to "link local only". This fixed my connection problems. This partial solution (controlling the ...


1

There appear to be four different types of IPv6 addresses: Main address, using your ISP prefix + derivation of your network-interface MAC-address. Temporary addresses, based on your main address but with randomization to prevent tracking. (a new one is generated every so often) Link-local address, identified by starting with fe80:. (not usable globally, ...


1

If it was working before without a tunnel, the issue is almost certainly the ISP. The AirPort extreme has fairly well-developed IPv6 support, and should work fine.


1

If I get your network configuration correctly, your setup is completely hosed. You need two separate (physical) networks: one with IPv4 only (e.g. ethernet) one with IPv6 only (e.g. local Wi-Fi) Depending of the capabilities of your machines, the machine with two interfaces (ethernet and Wi-Fi) should be the server (DNS/DHCP etc.)/NAT64-router (= macsrv). ...


1

I am not sure that this is an Apple issue, but a Ruby issue. You can see a bug report here. You might try specifying a ipv6-specific hostname upon initialization. For example, TCPServer.new('::1', pivotal_tracker_address) should allow you to use curl without specifying the -ipv6. I can't see you Ruby code, so I am not sure if this will fix your problem. ...


1

169.254.199.45 belongs to Zeroconf. This does not necessarily mean, that any IPv4 outgoing connection can be made or will be made. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Link-local_address and http://www.zeroconf.org/ (maintained by an Apple employee)


1

Just post my settings in case anyone need it. System Preferences -> Network -> Advance TCP/IP: set "Configure IPv4" off. DNS: add 2001:778::37, and drag it to the top Now you should be able to see contents in Mac app store. And it might take quite a while to establish connections for downloading. Just be patient. I also found a line in my /etc/...


1

Those packets are either blocked or corrupted by a network appliance or OS X itself (pfctl). If you are certain that Stealth Mode is disabled I would launch a packet capture with Wireshark and see if you get anything back from your ping6. If you have an other computer I would try to ping6 : Mac WiFi <=> router <=> PC Ethernet Mac WiFi <=> router ...


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