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Maybe this link helps to accomplish what you described: Installing OSX onto PPC using Intel Mac and Firewire If it works, let us know.


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Downgrading MacBook Pro 16” to Mojave The 16 inch MacBook Pro will not install Mojave. For those that are new versions of older gear like Mac Mini and iMacs, the drivers are likely good enough in Mojave so you can try using safari to download. There’s some good discussions on that below: How to download Mojave now that Catalina is available? How can I ...


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This is a primitive solution but it might help. Download this app (it allows you to search hidden files.) Search for the name of your application/repo you want to download. If it is not there, then it is safe to say you don't have it.


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I assume you know the name of the application. Then just test for existence of the application if [[ ! -d "/Applications/APP-TO-CHECK.app" ]]; then # install APP-TO-CHECK fi


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It depends I would not give one answer except do not mix homebrew and individual installs. However if you use Homebrew you cannot use official installers for cases like node. This is because both homebrew and node want to use /usr/local which is the most common place to install third party software under unix like operating systems. The stand build software ...


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You can partition the 2nd drive leaving ample room for the system software. Then you can install the system onto the 2nd drive or clone drive 1 onto drive 2 and have a backup of everything on drive one. Cloning allows you to use the 2nd drive as a startup drive. The downside to cloning is that you copy the entire contents from drive 1 to drive 2. Installing ...


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I tend more to macports/homebrew rather than official installers due to security concerns. There have been a number of incidents where software providers/vendors have had their servers compromised and malware was injected into the downloads. This can, quite possibly, also happen on macports/homebrew, but the difference is mainly that the people looking after ...


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I wonder how programs should be installed on Mac? Via Homebrew or an official installer if there is one? Other answers here have addressed various specifics. I'll restrict my answer to this question, make some recommendations, and briefly explain them. Role of a package manager in macOS I think most users of the various Linux and BSD distributions have come ...


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Regarding your first question Should I use Homebrew or the official installer? I feel the need to add a downside of using Homebrew which I didn't see here or in the other question: long term compatibility. Take for example El Capitan, which is installed on Macs that cannot be upgraded further. While those Macs still can function fine, Homebrew (as Apple) has ...


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If you're planning to install a lot of stuff, then you may find a package manager more useful; if there's only a handful of things that you need to install, which have their own installers and for which updating is easy, then installing something like HomeBrew may just add another layer of complexity. There are also security implications to putting all your ...


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There's a similar question here on Ask Different - What are pros and cons for MacPorts, Fink and Homebrew? - that does a comparison of the different package managers. It's an excellent read and I encourage you to review it. Should I use Homebrew or the official installer? Why? The main difference between using Homebrew and using the installer package is ...


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Should I use Homebrew or the official installer? Why? I'll always prefer a package manager like brew or conda over .pkg files which don't provide uninstallers. One can check what dependencies are going to be installed. Easy cleanup. No need to remember if something came with the standard macOS installation or installed later on. No need to type in root ...


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