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26

In terminal, you can use diskutil to get information about the drive, including the device block size: $ diskutil info / | grep "Block Size" Device Block Size: 512 Bytes


24

Taking aside the part that says which OS a particular filesystem is associated with, the main point is the word "journaled". I include the following Wikipedia quote as there is no point re-inventing the wheel: A journaling file system is a file system that keeps track of the changes that will be made in a journal (usually a circular log in a ...


18

The other answer seems to be correct about the file system being HFSX*, but on being case-insensitive (other answer since edited to correct), I found that not to be the case in the book Mac OS X and iOS Internals. On page 23 it says: In iOS, being the case sensitive HFSX by default, case is not only preserved, but allows for multiple files to have the ...


17

You use diskutil for that. See diskutil(1) under enableOwnership and disableOwnership. Note that this setting is specific to a particular operating system installation, since it is stored in /var/db/volinfo.database. I.e., if you copy the disk image to a new computer the setting won't persist, but it does persist across reboots, mounts, umounts, etc. all on ...


15

It should work by exiting any High Sierra installer GUI and starting the install from the command line: /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/startosinstall --converttoapfs NO Further install options can be obtained by using the --usage argument: Arguments --applicationpath, a path to copy of the OS installer application to ...


12

First, note that Device Block Size is different from the block size in use by the filesystem. The former value as reported by diskutil refers to the raw block size used by the hardware. I haven't found an easy way to check the latter value by the command line, but you can just create a zero-byte file then do Get Info from the Finder. It will say 0 bytes, but ...


12

It seems the theoretical limit is about 1 billion hard links on an HFS+ volume. Indirect node files have a special identifying number called a link reference. The link reference is unique among indirect node files on a given volume. The link reference is not related to catalog node IDs. When a new indirect node file is created, it is assigned a new link ...


11

If the disk is mounted to ignore file ownership, the owner is always reported as the current user, and cannot be changed. Attempting to change the owner will not produce an error message, but simply fail silently. In the Finder, select the mounted disk corresponding to the sparse image in question and Get Info (⌘I). At the bottom of the pane that opens, see ...


11

According to iOS Forensic Analysis, the main filesystem is HFSX. HSFX All Apple mobile devices use HFSX as the file system. HFSX is a variation of HFS+ with one major difference. HFSX is case sensitive. HFSX is reported by Apple as Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Case-Sensitive). There are two main partitions of HFSX: the OS and the user data. Prior ...


11

Whether you choose APFS or HFS+ for the sparse disk image will matter very little. They are synthetic filesystems and pass through iOPS and data to the underlying filesystem. That will have some technical details to consider and illuminate the differences how each relies on the storage to store filesystem data and work with or against the hardware that ...


10

I format my external disks as Mac OS Extended (Journaled) if I plan to use it with OS X as journaling reduces change of drive filesystem corruption if something unexpected happens when I'm writing data to that external disk, for e.g. OS X hibernates A/C power cuts off to a Mac desktop a Mac laptop battery drops to 0 power laptop HDD went to sleep in ...


10

Yes - High Sierra fully supports running / booting from HFS+ since it doesn’t even change any system over to APFS except for Apple SSD based systems. Fusion drives and spinning HDD hard drives all remain on HFS+ as do all external drives connected to your High Sierra system.


9

The OS X device block size can be determined by executing the following command from a Terminal window prompt: diskutil info / | grep "Block Size" Which will output the following information: Device Block Size: 512 Bytes The file system block size can be determined by using the stat utility: stat -f %k . Which will show you the Optimal file system I/O ...


9

Recent Experience For what it's worth, I recently used a loner MacBook Pro for a week while mine was in the shop. Because I mostly use my mac to develop software for unix servers (typically using case-sensitive ext4 file systems) I decided to give HFS+ case-sensitive another try. For me, all core OS X applications worked perfectly and I didn't notice any ...


9

The easiest way is using the diskutil command line as follows: diskutil info / You will see a report which will include something like this for an APFS formatted storage: Volume Name: Macintosh HD Mounted: Yes Mount Point: / Partition Type: 41504752-0000-11AA-AA23-01306543EFEA File System Personality: ...


8

dot_clean dot_clean(1) Mac OS X Manual Page Apple's description: For each dir, dot_clean recursively merges all ._* files with their corresponding native files according to the rules specified with the given arguments. By default, if there is an attribute on the native file that is also present in the ._ file, the most recent attribute will be ...


7

When choosing file system format, one needs to consider expected usage. SD cards are much more sensitive to write operations than traditional hard drives. A journaled file system adds additional layer of writes on top of the data itself, which reduces the life span of the drive. Therefore, for mostly static storage (music, apps, books) where writes are few ...


7

AFAIK the Apple HFS+ drivers are read-only. You may have installed another read/write driver like Paragon. To remove Apple HFS+ Driver: Browse to C:\Windows\System32\drivers\ Move AppleHFS.sys & AppleMNT.sys to the Recycle Bin Create a Remove_AppleHFS.reg file with a text editor like NotePad and the following content: Windows Registry Editor Version 5....


7

APFS (Apple File System) compared to HFS+ Almost all differences apply to Solid State Drives (SSD) and Hard Disk Drives (HDD) as well, while users of HDDs may not see an improvement in speed. APFS disadvantages/drawbacks Incompatible with macOS 10.12 Sierra and earlier (including OS X) Windows drivers/tools to read/write APFS disks are not available (as ...


6

As of iOS 10.3 (March 2017) - APFS/Apple File System is now the file system being used. Previous to iOS 10.3 HFS+ was being used. APFS will add improved support for solid-state drives and encryption improvements - things that were not a priority 20 years ago when HFS+ was introduced.


6

From Apple KB : Backup disks you can use with Time Machine Formatting a backup disk for use with Time Machine The most common format for a Time Machine backup disk is Mac OS Extended (Journaled) format. Time Machine also supports Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled), Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled, Encrypted), and Xsan ...


5

It's always better unless you must use the drive with an OS that is too old or too different to support the GPT format. Windows, Unix, macOS all support GPT / GUID and APM is not widely supported on other OS. To elaborate, GUID (or more properly GPT - the GUID partition table scheme) is the new bootable standard for Macs so use it unless you have macs that ...


5

@williamvoor: The script fails with filepaths which contain spaces, as set the file_name to the POSIX path of this_item does not escape properly. Correct the appropriate line of your code to this: set cmd to "/Users/sn/bin/bin/afsctool -c \"" & file_name & "\"" Explanation: afcstool's file_name argument is surrounded with quotation marks, which ...


5

There are two parts to the answer to your question. How to add a Finder context menu item to “Archive” files: this is easy to achieve by creating an Automator Service (Mac OS X Automation has a good overview of what the Automator services introduced in OS X 10.6 can do): Launch Automator, choose “Service” when prompted for the kind of workflow you want to ...


5

I found that both answers worked for enabling ownership in way that is remembered: sudo diskutil enableOwnership <diskname>s<slicenum> And: vsdbutil -a /Volume/<volname> However, the opposite is not true, at least on OS X 10.11.3: sudo diskutil disableOwnership <diskname>s<slicenum> And: vsdbutil -d /Volume/<volname>...


5

In addition to @bmike's very good answer, some legacy programs expect the directory listing to be pre-sorted as it is in HFS+; this is an uncommon issue but some things (especially ones which implement their own custom file selector for whatever reason) run into it all the same.


4

Apple uses "multiple fork" or the shortened form "multi-fork" consistently through its documentation, so it seems it is the official term. I list here a few examples: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/General/Conceptual/SLGlobalGlossary/Glossary/Glossary.html (Last updated: 2010-07-09) HFS+ Hierarchical File System Plus. The Mac OS ...


4

With the older HFS file system, Apple's second attempt at a file system for the Macintosh, there could only be up to 65,535 allocation blocks on a disk. The block size was a function of the disk size in bytes divided by the maximum number of allocation blocks, 65,535. For small disks this was fine, but when disk sizes started to approach 1GB in size the ...


4

I'm afraid there's no non-destructive way to revert back to HFS once converted. You may use diskutil apfs deleteContainer /dev/disk(x)s(x) (where x is your correct APFS container). This will revert the APFS container back to HFS but will destroy all data. Best find another pool of storage to copy all data from that drive to, then revert, then copy back.


4

Yes, you can use a normal Time Capsule that is not APFS-formatted with APFS-formatted disks. APFS and Time Machine You don't need to change any Time Machine settings to back up APFS-formatted disks. Any Time Machine share points must be shared over SMB instead of AFP. Source: Apple.com This applies to Apple’s TimeCapsules as well. They are just ...


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