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40

According to Rhys Oxenhams: the kernel will keep looping some very simple tasks, e.g. getting the date, therefore ‘consuming’ (with the highest priority) the majority of the CPU in a bid to cool the system down. The solution he mentions on his blog should work for earlier Macs. For Ivy-Bridge Macs and a little earlier Richard Schwarting has found ...


16

See a solution here for the problem - http://www.vanetta.net/2012/07/enabling-hdmi-audio-controls-on-2011.html Requires the free third party app - https://code.google.com/p/soundflower/ but it works perfectly.


16

macOS is outputting sound over HDMI and has decided that volume should only be changed on the device receiving the sound. If you want the audio to come out of the monitor, adjust its volume directly (or connect speakers). Otherwise, use either the Volume item in the menu bar (the speaker icon) or the Sound system preference to change your audio output device ...


13

The audio signal over HDMI is encoded. Encoded audio streams should be normalized to 0 dB. You cannot change this behavior as the audio signal would not be normalized anymore. You can only use the volume controls of your TV set. Some programs (like iTunes) have volume control themselves, those can be used to change the volume of that specific program. (...


11

More than likely, the issue is, in fact, your Mini DP to HDMI adapter. The AmazonBasics Mini DisplayPort to HDMI Adapter adapter that you listed is a passive adapter (notice nowhere do they say "active"). Additionally, is much less expensive than an active converter like the Cable Matters Active Mini DisplayPort to HDMI Adapter Passive vs. Active So, ...


10

There should be an "Underscan" adjustment in display preferences. Open up the Displays in System Preferences. Have a look at your available resolutions. There should be a 720p, 1080i and 1080p, choose whichever is appropriate for your TV, and a slider labelled Underscan should appear. Adjust as necessary to get the picture right on your TV.


10

After a few months of experimentation, we found no 3rd party (i.e., non-Apple branded) HDMI <> VGA adaptors which worked well and some which didn't work at all on our Macs. We bit the financial bullet and purchased Apple-branded adaptors and they work perfectly. We found the same with Thunderbolt & USB <> gig-Ethernet adaptors and Lightning <> ...


10

I have multiple devices I connect to my mac and for some they had the same issue. The work around (or actual fix) is to open 'audio midi setup' in your applications>utility folder and create a 'new aggregate device' or multi-output device' and turn off/on the inputs/outputs sound based on needs. The plus sign on the bottom left corner.


10

This may not be the only available resource on this topic, but it is a comprehensive & reliable one... EveryMac, as the name suggests, has information on every Mac model ever made [also iPhones, iPads, iPods], including but not limited to the number of external displays supported & their maximum specification. If you are not absolutely certain ...


9

There is no reason why it wouldn't work. In fact I use even cheaper (but shorter) cables myself and they work fine. For reference, I paid €0.75 a piece for a couple of 0.75m HDMI cables with a local online cable shop, and they work fine for 1080p video. I'd advise to not succumb to the "gold or silver plated" marketing nonsense or the overpriced "premium" ...


9

I own a 2013 MacBook Air. This is equipped with a Thunderbolt 1 port : Mini-DisplayPort -> HDMI adapter (1920x1200 max.) Mini-DisplayPort -> DisplayPort adapter (upto 2560x1600 max.) I've used both and am now driving daily on my MBA 13" with a monitor running at 2560x1440.


9

cscreen You can use the freely available Terminal app cscreen to force display settings. The app is pretty self explanatory. brew cask install cscreen cscreen -h Usage: cscreen [-d <depth>] [-x <width>] [-y <height>] [-r <refresh>] [-s <display>] [-v] [-m] [-f] [-l] [-h] [-d <depth>] : specifies the bit ...


9

According to Apple's Technical Specifications 13” 2017 MacBook Pro is able to support 2 external displays. Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display at millions of colors and: One display with 5120x2880 resolution at 60Hz at over a billion colours Up to two displays with 4096x2304 resolution at 60Hz at millions of ...


7

Amazon Fire TV requires a TV with an HDMI input channel to display video, something MacBooks (or pretty much any computer) are lacking. So no, this will not work (it won't work with an Apple TV/MacBook combination either).


7

The MacBook Pro's HDMI port has a DVI-D implementation. This means it has no analog signal, which is what VGA relies on to connect. More information here: apple support forums . Apple supplies an HDMI to DVI adapter, which could solve your problem if your monitor has a DVI port. If not, then I would suggest getting a Thunderbolt (Mini DisplayPort) to VGA ...


7

I would go for USB-C to DisplayPort directly. That would be one relatively inexpensive ($20 to $40 US prices) cable to do the job. Since your display won't charge the MacBook and do video over a single USB-C cable and you have several ports (display side and Mac side) - a dedicated cable would be my choice. I like the USB-C to HDMI adapter you mentioned for ...


7

The video signal on the Thunderbolt connection on your MBP is actually Display Port so you are actually going from Display Port to HDMI. I am not a fan of converting signals because it's flaky at best. If you must connect to HDMI, try an active1 adapter like the TRENDnet USB-C to HDMI 4K. They have two versions - one that does 30Hz and another that does ...


6

Install Homebrew: ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)" Install Cask brew install caskroom/cask/brew-cask Install Soundflower: brew cask install soundflower Reboot. Start soundflowerbed (find it by pressing cmd-space to open spotlight): Click the Soundflower icon in the top-right and select your output ...


6

Yes - you might be overlooking that all the Display Port adapters work perfectly well with Thunderbolt macs. Just place it at the end of the chain. It's not an issue since your VGA or HDMI device isn't going to have another Thunderbolt port in the chain to send the data further. You are necessarily connecting at the end of the line. The Moshi is my ...


6

Additionally, don't forget that Thunderbolt really means mini DisplayPort where video adapters are being considered. Since a DVI connection is required for your external display get something that will end in a DVI connection. Additionally don't forget to shop around for adapters, places like MonoPrice can help you save a bundle on adapters and Cables when ...


6

That model of MBP supports audio through that adapter, so you should be getting sound. It could be any number of things. I think your problem is on the TV side, but Here are a bunch of things to try: First, make sure you're connected to your TV and getting an HDMI video signal to the video input you've selected. Go to your MIDI Audio Setup again and make ...


6

Hold the Option key and click on the Volume/Sound icon on your Menu Bar. When you're connected via HDMI, you should have an option show in the local menu to select that connection to feed the audio through rather than the standard audio output.


6

Go into the menu on your external monitor. If there's an option that allows one device to toggle the power on the other via HDMI, make sure this is deselected (honestly, I don't think this will have an effect as your laptop is doing the driving, but for the sake of troubleshooting...). I too use an MBP Retina with external monitor (via HDMI). If I shut off ...


6

Being that VGA is an analog signal, and (Mini) DP / HDMI are both digital signals, an adapter will be required. Given that you wanted a solution that used HDMI, a powered HDMI port is necessary, which is not be included with the MBP, in addition Apple does not support such a configuration: Can the HDMI port drive analog displays (VGA displays, for ...


6

I have a similar device (Early 2015 rMBP with 16 GB running macOS Sierra 10.12.6) and can confirm that it will power an external 4K display at 60 Hz - it's supposed to power two external displays at 4K (3840x2160) in addition to the builtin display, in fact. However, there are anomalies on my side when it comes to the refresh rate depending on my screen ...


6

I won't say it is going to be impossible to ever use your MacBook Pro as a display for your Raspberry Pi, but I will say it will be impossible to use it as a monitor for a Raspberry Pi that's never been set up before. Basically there is no hardware way of making the MBP display available to another device. You can use software to do this, but then you would ...


5

You may want to check out Monoprice. They have a ton of adapters, cables and other accessories, which in my experience have all been of good quality, for much cheaper prices. They have the specific MiniDisplayport or Thunderbolt to HDMI Adapter you need for under $7. They've got a pretty extensive collection of cheap HDMI cables to go along with it as well.


5

Yes, that should definitely be possible, as both Thunderbolt ports are also mini DisplayPort ports and the other would be connected via HDMI. See also this answer: https://apple.stackexchange.com/a/54306/14994


5

No, the video ports (HDMI and Thunderbolt) are output only. The MacBooks aren't designed to function as monitors. You could try getting a video capture device that supports live viewing, but the performance and quality are likely to be far from optimal—such solutions are designed for recording video, not live playback or gaming.


5

Go to the Utilities folder in the Applications folder and open the Audio MIDI Setup application. Select the HDMI Audio Device connected to the Dell U3011 monitor. Configure the audio format to "44100.0 Hz" and "2ch - 16bit Integer". As far as my minimal testing shows, this should fix the issue.


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