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The link you have provided outlines a method which requires a third party tool to install Windows 10 on an external HDD or SSD. The use of third party tools is unnecessary since Apple and Microsoft together provide all the necessary software required to install Windows 10 on an external HDD or SSD of any intel based Mac that can boot Windows 10 from an ...


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This sounds like a failing NVRAM (Non-Volatile Random Access Memory) chip - it's not holding the boot values. When you do an NVRAM reset, it clears the pre-boot environment forcing your Mac to search for bootable volumes which it then writes to NVRAM. After you shut it off, power is removed from the NVRAM chip and as the voltage dissipates, it loses or ...


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The answer is no. This answer assumes the partitions are in chronological order. This is one of the problems which was solved by APFS. With APFS, more than one APFS volume can reside in a partition and the volumes can share the space. In your case, you would need to shrink the a partition by 100 GB. There a tools provided by Apple or third parties that can ...


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Boot any Mac to target disk mode and it shows up on supported buses as an external hard drive. Hold T at boot, connect via thunderbolt https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201462


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If your hard drive is blank, you cannot use regular Recovery Mode (⌘ CommandR) because there won't be a recovery partition from which to boot The 2011 Mac mini, if the firmware was upgraded can boot from Internet Recovery using the keyboard combination ⌘ Command⌥ OptionR. Once there, you can use Disk Utility (accessed from the menu bar) to validate the size ...


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You’ve got a few options here: Lookup the machine exact hard drive capacity by entering the serial number on the Every Mac website. Boot the Mac Mini while holding down the ⌘ CommandR keys to enter recovery mode and then chose the Disk Utility option (normally at the bottom of the menu) this will show you the capacity of the installed hard drive. I’ve ...


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I wouldn't put much faith in an 11-year-old drive, long-term. I certainly wouldn't put the only copy of any data on it. That said, so long as you never expect to boot from it again*, then the old System files are just waste space, deleting them would be harmless. It wouldn't, however, give you any speed increase, merely more free space. Old 'spinny rust' ...


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Your Mac also stores the information about Wi-Fi access points it connected to in NVRAM. From the Apple Support article: https://support.apple.com/kb/HT204063 NVRAM (nonvolatile random-access memory) is a small amount of memory that your Mac uses to store certain settings and access them quickly. While iCloud keychain also stores the Wi-Fi access point ...


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If you use iCloud Keychain then via this link it states: If you use iCloud, you can have iCloud Keychain securely store the website login information and credit card information you use with AutoFill in Safari, and your Wi-Fi network information. iCloud Keychain automatically keeps that information up to date across all your Mac computers and iOS and iPadOS ...


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If you're intending to reinstall macOS on the disk at some point (which 99% of people would be), then use these: Name Enter a name for the disk: 'Macintosh HD' is the default on a new Mac Format use APFS for formatting, and Scheme GUID Partition Map for scheme Notes This source recommends using 'Mac OS Extended (Journaled)' format. BUT if you want to ...


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I was looking for something similar and came across this article How to Quickly Unmount External Drives From the macOS Menu Bar for an app called Semulov. Works as advertised.


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A "time out" means that a command was sent and the system is waiting for a response but didn't get one. Instead of waiting forever, a period of time is hard coded into the utility (diskutil) to wait and once it's reached, it generates the error. Also, when you see "invalid request" as a response from your disk it means that the controller ...


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This is not a problem. I have a 2010 iMac with an HDD and I have Temperature Gauge 4.1. It reports the temperature at 14 different locations in my iMac. My computer is basically idling right now. 9 of the 14 locations have a temperature that is over 60°C, with the Power Supply Heatsink reporting 75°C. The locations that are not reporting temperatures over 60°...


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If time machine is the taking the space, than using tmutil can help. List of snapshots can be checked using: tmutil listlocalsnapshots / And cleanup upto 100GiB using: tmutil thinlocalsnapshots / $((100 * 1024 * 1204 * 1024)) 4 Last two arguments are: amount of space to try to reclaim (using $(( )) to calculate 100 GiB) urgency, 1 is default, 4 is highest ...


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While I don't want to labor the points already made, I do believe it should be called out that "accidental deletion" is not the only failure mode that can ruin your iCloud "backup" (i.e., sync). Other possible failures, due to iCloud sync'ing and not maintaining a fully "independent" (i.e., non-local), "distinct" (i.e....


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To add the space from the deleted container to the existing container, the deleted container would at least have to physically reside after the existing container. In your case, this probably was not true. You can confirm this by viewing the output from the command given below. diskutil info disk0s3 | grep -e Size -e Offset Here, I assume the existing ...


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That 715.8 GB "Macintosh SSD - Data" looks to be a remnant of Catalina. Catalina creates a System disk and a Data disk and uses firmlinks to make them appear as one drive in Finder. But the System disk is read only. Meanwhile your macOS High Sierra volume is using only that volume for everything. I think if you delete the APFS Volume Macintosh SSD ...


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iCloud is not a backup. It is a synchronization service. There is a fundamental difference between the two. When you accidentally delete a file, then a backup makes sure that you can restore the file again, whereas a synchronization service makes sure that you can never again restore the file because it synchronizes the deletion event everwhere. As you can ...


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The built-in 120GB is part of the Fusion drive. A Fusion drive is a software solution where two physical disks are joined as one drive. If either disk fails you can lose all data. Sounds like your 3TB HDD experienced a fault which is not unusual after 6 years of life. The 120GB SSD is soldered to the system board so that cannot be replaced It is ...


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The new paradigm is… "Any data which is stored in fewer than three distinct locations ought to be considered temporary." Late Edit: Don't use a sync solution as a backup. iCloud is not primarily a backup solution, it is a sync solution. It will come back to bite you hard if you accidentally delete a file from one device… the helpful sync service ...


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Yes. I have one mac that I set to download originals - no optimizing space. This way I have a guaranteed local copy of my Music (formerly iTunes) Library and content, my Photos (formerly iPhoto) Library and content and all containers and app-data and files stored in iCloud. I back these up to Time Machine. I have two drives that Time Machine backs up to - ...


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Format your SSD as APFS and use it as your boot drive. That will make a noticeable speed improvement over using a magnetic disk. APFS is optimized for SSDs and runs poorly on spinning platters, so format your 120GB drive as HFS+. Your 120 GB drive is nearly worthless at this point. Maybe you could use a tool like Carbon Copy Cloner to keeps some important ...


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Just for the record. I've managed to increase the size of my APFS volume using GParted and Disk Utility (from macOS Catalina). Create a GParted USB drive and boot from it Use GParted to move the APFS partition/container around so that the free space appears directly AFTER the APFS partition. Boot into Mac Recovery mode and open Disk Utility Click the drop-...


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Seems that MacOS has an option to do exactly what I need: sudo defaults write /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/autodiskmount AutomountDisksWithoutUserLogin -bool YES Afterwards my external SSD is directly accessible by the daemon (if I wait some seconds because the daemon starts before the external SSD has been mounted). Additionally the external SSD ...


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I am thinking this is an OS problem. There's no evidence of this. But if you want to be sure you can do either/both of two things: Boot into Safe Mode where it's a clean version of macOS - no 3rd party apps or kexts (drivers) Try on a different computer Intermittent issues are usually hardware related: Physically a bad port. For instance, there may be ...


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Device IDs are what the system uses to identify the drive. They often change depending on when and even where they are detected (Internal vs. USB vs Thunderbolt). For instance, an old hard drive bootable drive might be identified as disk1s2. Take it out and put it in a USB enclosure, attach it to another Mac and it suddenly becomes disk3. This is not ...


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