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Either the SSD, or its connecting cable, or the underlying Mac Mini (either hardware or software) has a problem. Isolate the issue by taking the SSD out of the Mini, and connecting it to another Mac. If the drive mounts, that suggests the connecting cable or the underlying Mac Mini is the problem. Keep swapping parts until you find the bad link in the ...


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Recently I ran into a similar problem. See Problem cloning the startup disk of a MacBook Pro running OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan . Keep an eye on how you cloned your system partition residing on the SSD. I guess your system partition is of type CoreStorage. If so, the recipe I figured out for cloning the startup disk may be useful to you.


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I was able to get data back using Photorec but was unable to get original filenames or directory structures. I did find R-Studio https://r-studio.com which recovered the entire file and folder structure. It's a paid product but worked out well. Still can't fix the Invalid B-tree node size issue. It almost seems like a partition issue.


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It is possible from recovery mode. Start the mac in recovery mode (hold cmd+R at boot). Open disk utility, select volume from the left click Edit and convert to APFS. If option is greyed out unmount the volume first from the toolbar.


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What steps should I take next, to investigate this issue without harming the failed drive further? Stop using, manipulating, testing, whatever you're doing to the drive immediately. At this point, all you know is that your RAID array failed. You don't know what in your RAID failed and it could be one of two components: The enclosure The drives If it's ...


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Early in your question you mention that you think it was a RAID-0. It is very important to know what kind of RAID it was. If it was a RAID-0 there is no parity, fault-tolerance or redundancy so if one of the drives failed, which your description suggests, and it truly was a RAID-0 then your data is gone. It is possible that you can ship the drives off to a ...


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If it's a striped RAID setup (e.g. RAID 0), then failure of one drive means you lose the whole thing. If one drive isn't working, you'll only have half of every file. You should be able to install any pair of compatible drives, e.g. 3.5" SATA or whatever.


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OK, finally I solved this problem. My solution: Use Disk Utility.app to create a new blank image with sparseimage type and save it at the external ssd drive. Then mount the sparse image at the target location, such as hdiutil attach /Volumes/<externalssd>/file.sparseimage -mountpoint ~/Library/Containers/<target_path> move all the original files ...


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Why do I have to clone the internal drive to an external drive and then reboot from the external drive? What does this accomplish? Technically, it allows you to re-partition and format your internal drive as APFS because you can't be mounted to the drive/partition you want to modify. Booting from the external drive allows you to modify the internal drive. ...


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I’m assuming your ultimate goal is to get that 2011 iMac up and running, but you’re experiencing trepidation about the prospect of replacing the internal disk drive because it’s behind a large glass screen. You don’t need to install macOS onto an external drive to get things working. Create a USB installer. This model iMac supports Internet Recovery as ...


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If you see the spinning globe icon at boot, and are prompted for an Internet connection, then technically you're in Internet Recovery Mode, which doesn't rely upon any local partition to boot. If you can get your device connected to your network, either by using an Ethernet adapter or temporarily using a different or open wireless network, you'll be able to ...


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mbp 2012: sata interface. mbp early 2013: also sata interface, so switch is easy. mbp late 2013 PCLE interface, thus impossible to switch, and then: Price of a sata SSD 500GB lower that 100$, so buy a new one, format the new SSD and then clone the old 2012 disk to the new SSD while it is still outside, then the switch the SSDs could be easy.


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Out of the box, definable you not. The 2013 MacBook Pro laptops use a proprietary PCIe interface whereas the 2012 used a SATA III interface. There may be a PCIe to SATA adapter, but I haven seen any that are compatible with the Mac’s proprietary interface. Even so, SATA SSDs are very cost effective right now, so it’s not practical to add that extra ...


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After much toil, I discovered that indeed it was APFS and since my system was version 10.11.6, it would not work. On 10.13.x, I was able to double-click the image file and mount it. This is because older versions of macOS do not support APFS. Thanks to all who assisted, or attempted to assist me in this matter. Additionally, for those out there looking ...


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This can be done from macOS Recovery without the use of a mouse and primarily using just the arrow, tab and space keys. The enter key may need to be used on some objects, depending on the selection(s) made: Boot to macOS Recovery by holding down ⌘R when starting the Mac. At the macOS Utilities window, press the down-arrow key four times. This highlights ...


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If you can open the Terminal, the command rm -r * will erase the whole disk, we usually avoid telling anyone that because they may accidentally use it - most people here aren't looking to erase their disk drive. You can type man rm to read the man page for the rm command.


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You can absolutely use dd to clone your MacOS disk that has an APFS partition. The issue is that your source and target do not share the same sector size. This isn't a huge issue, though, as the only thing that matters is that the partitions are aligned to the sectors, not the data within them. So if you erase the target disk in Disk Utility selecting GUID ...


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The asr command is the native tool to clone data and handles all Apple metadata, file systems and APFS / core storage structures. If no one can help, worst case is to restore from a backup and use asr rather than dd the data destroyer. I partially joke about dd - it’s more useful than just destroying disks, but on several macOS filesystems, you don’t want ...


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I'd suggest this a hardware problem: you'd be best served by finding a local independent Apple repair company, and asking them to replace the SSD with a new/secondhand Apple unit. They'd be experienced at taking it apart and would charge a reasonable price. An Apple Store might say it's too old, or charge a lot. The same modules are used across Apple's ...


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There is the following command. system_profiler SPStorageDataType You will have to parse the output. For example, I have a external HDD with a single volume named RONSPASPORT. The output relevant to this drive is given below. RON2PASPORT: Available: 29.27 GB (29,266,157,568 bytes) Capacity: 500.11 GB (500,105,216,000 bytes) Mount Point: /Volumes/...


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Based on the latest information posted in the question, here is what to enter. The assumption is the values posted are correct. The drive used a 4096 sector size. Since image files are fixed at a 512 byte sector size, all the values need to be multiplied by 8. Note: You may get an error message when entering the command to destroy the GPT. You should ...


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