New answers tagged

2

The short answer is no. When you use FileVault, you are encrypting the entire boot volume, not just a single volume or folder. If you're looking for something where you can encrypt a removable volume (i.e. USB drive), take a look at VeraCrypt where it allows you to have both password and keyfile authentication. It's also cross platform which is definitely a ...


0

Here is an example of how a disk recovery key can be extracted from iCloud to allow for decryption of your disk. In general, no real method is safer than the other. The convenience of iCloud makes it an acceptable place to store your recovery key. Remember if storing it in iCloud, there is no good way to browse and extract your key unless you follow the ...


1

FileVault decryption does not erase any data or reset your computer. When the decryption process is finished, the computer will be just like before - except that the data on disk is no longer encrypted. You can use the computer while it is decryption. As this was done by accident, it is a good idea to enable FileVault again when it is done decrypting. It ...


0

Firmware password is something you need the password or Apple’s willing assistance to bypass. FileVault and data encryption is trivial to erase by booting to another OS (Internet Recovery is often the easiest other OS) to wipe and reinstall. Firmware password and hardware failures are the only things that interfere with an erase and install in my experience, ...


2

The security you’ve enabled probably won’t deter the theft of your laptop. Most criminals who get the opportunity to snatch a laptop will take it no matter how useless you can make it with encryption and firmware locks. Why? Ignorance of the criminal. No matter how much Apple advertises it, the common thief won’t know until they get it back home only ...


1

No. The firmware lock prevents even this. Firmware doesn’t reside on the drive, it resides in a protected “memory” (not RAM) area that holds the boot, encryption, management, etc. software. In fact, if you want to test it, set an EFI lock and remove the drive. Then try to boot. You’ll notice that the password is still there As someone who carries my ...


Top 50 recent answers are included