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SHORT ANSWER The answer to your question as asked in the title is it really depends on what ports you have available, personal preference, cost, etc. I say this because both USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt are faster than ethernet, so it doesn't matter which way you go from a speed point of view. More specifically (and at the risk of oversimplifying it): ...


25

According to Apple Support: Choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Network. Click the Action pop-up menu , then choose Set Service Order. Drag a service, such as Ethernet, to the top of the list. Click OK, then click Apply to make the new settings active. Full article is here.


21

It's possible to set network access interface priority order. Go to System Preferences → Network, click on the lock icon to unlock the preference pane. Now click on the gear icon shown towards the bottom of the network interface list, and select Set Service Order... command. Now, in the new pane that opens, you can drag the priority network interface (...


21

MacOS does not come with such a restriction. There's no built-in feature that limits transfer speeds to 118 Mpbs (or similar value) after while. You can build such a feature yourself using the included pf packet filter, but I assume you have not done so. As your network settings show that the speed negotiated between the ethernet port on the dock/Mac and the ...


18

You sure can! Open System Preferences, then go to Sharing and select Internet Sharing. Change "Share your connection from:" to Wi-Fi, and then in the box below it select Ethernet.


18

For Realtek based USB 2.0 or 3.0 Ethernet Adapters, you can get the driver from Realtek which works for both 8153 and 8152.


18

There may be several different ways to accomplish what you're asking, however, I'll just throw this out there. I have a MacBook Pro that doesn't have a built-in Ethernet Port so in my examples I'll use Hardware Port: Wi-Fi since I tested this in both examples below and it worked, however you can change it to Hardware Port: Ethernet if that is what the output ...


18

We have a brand new Late 2016 Macbook Pro and 2 Apple/LG 21.5 USB-C 4K monitors. Daisy-chaining/MST does not work. We are using the monitors and nothing else with the original cables. Only way to get it to work is to connect each to individual USB-C ports on the MBP. Sad but true.


17

Late to answer but still for those landing here looking for a Ethernet connectivity status icon in menu bar, check this macOS app Ethernet Status - The Missing LAN Status Bar Icon. It shows ethernet interface, IP Address and if interface is active via changing menu bar icon. More here It does differentiate between WIFI and Wired Ethernet and shows the ...


15

The solution is to try and reset as many network related system preferences as possible. To be more specific: Unplug the Thunderbolt Ethernet adapter. Create and Apply a new default network location (system preferences). Remove all older pre-existing network locations. Remove the following preference files (global and user specific found in /Library/...


13

Try System Preferences > Profiles. It listed my 802.1X profiles and I was able to remove them from there. Alternatively, you can manually edit configuration files in /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration (see this post) - grep the files located there for the name of your profile. (Using OS X Mavericks) (Profiles is located in the second row from ...


13

As far as I understand, you can run a lot of generic ones that don't have Apple-signed drivers by disabling "System Integrity Protection" (SIP) From: http://inkandfeet.com/how-to-use-a-generic-usb-20-10100m-ethernet-adaptor-rd9700-on-mac-os-1011-el-capitan Steps to get your adapter working if you've never used the adapter before in Mac OS 10.11 El ...


13

Check your network cable If it's not a software based issue, it's likely hardware. I'd replace the network cable with a known good one. Even cables that look OK can have issues.


12

There is an app on Mac App Store that does exactly that: Ethernet Status It also shows status of Thunderbolt network adaptors. Sadly it is not free.


12

Here is a step-by-step guide for you: Temporarily disable any Firewall/Internet Security solution/packet filter on your Mac (like LittleSnitch/Hands Off!/Kaspersky Internet Security etc.) Connect to the administrative interface of your router with a working Mac. Make a note of the internal interface (probably 192.168.0.1 in your case) If your router uses ...


12

I would recommend Thunderbolt, as it is essentially external PCI-Express, which is the same bus an internal network card (among other things like graphics cards, etc) is attached to. PCI-E (and thus Thunderbolt) support DMA, which allows the network card to write packets to the system's memory directly without involving the CPU. USB as far as I know does ...


11

I fixed this issue by installing my adapter's chipset driver on Mac Os X. After rebooting, the usual command (e.g. sudo ifconfig en6 ether xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx) works as expected. Below the details. I had the same problem with a Tecknet UL688G USB 3.0 to 10/100/1000 Gigabit Ethernet adaptor. On both Mac Os X 10.10.5 (Yosemite) and 10.11.4 (El Capitan) the ...


11

Old post, but just wanted to give an update. Sometimes you just need to install the chipset's drivers. Asix Driver If you are lucky, you will have an Asix's chipset and you can do the folling to find the proper USB ethernet adapter drivers in macOS. find the adapter chipset in The Apple menu > About this Mac > System Report (button) > Hardware > ...


11

An answer from my personal experience: I've used both original Apple's Thunderbolt to Gigabit Ethernet adapter Cable Matters DB50 USB 3.0 to Gigabit Ethernet adapter and noticed no difference when testing for speed nor in daily use.


10

After inspecting your configuration, it seems two factors might be in play here: DNS Firewall A quick way to confirm a working internet connection but bad DNS is going to a website by using it's IP address rather than it's domain name. For example: http://91.198.174.192 which is a WikiMedia Foundation address. It should say something like "unconfigured ...


10

After doing a little research on Dell's daisy chaining monitors, I came across this bit of info on their support site: Multi-Stream Transport (MST), also known as Daisy Chaining, is a new connection specification that allows multiple monitors to be connected in series with the video signal being passed from the computer to a monitor, and then from ...


10

I'm not sure if this answers the question but I'm testing this out right now with a new MacBook Pro Touchbar 13" with 4 USB-C ports. In the testing I'm using the Minix Neo C Hub which has 2x USB3 - Type A ports Gigabit Ethernet SD Card Reader HDMI Another USB-C that you can use for your power adapter I'm able to get two monitors working, one through HDMI ...


10

In a default setup, macOS will prefer the ethernet connection over the WiFi connection automatically. You do not need to fear that you're limiting your network speeds by also connecting to WiFi. You can change the default order by opening System Preferences, select Network, click on the Gear icon below the interface list and select "Set Service Order". ...


9

You can use BitBar with the Emoji Active Network Interface Indicator to show an emoji in your menubar that indicates if you are on Wi-Fi or another interface. BitBar: http://getbitbar.com Emoji Active Network Interface Indicator: https://github.com/toupsz/emoji-active-network-interface-indicator


9

I've seen this happen when the local DNS server has DNS caching enabled, but doesn't flush the cache often enough (or at all). You can set your Host Name/Computer Name to a static value using scutil in Terminal. This means that your Mac will no longer change it's name automatically, so it's important that there are no other machines on your network that ...


9

Yes - the vast majority of ethernet adapters work - especially USB-C since they are generally very new, a little more pricey and use fairly standard types of control chips and usb chips. The Belkin you listed is both plug and play when the OS is booted, it also works at netboot from the hardware / EFI / firmware so it's truly driverless on the new Mac. ...


8

Sharing your source Internet using WiFi to your Ethernet output.


8

Yes, you can use an ethernet cable to quickly transfer files from one computer to the other. It's really quite simple. Plug in the cable Go to System Preferences, and make sure that Ethernet is enabled. (it should be in the "Network" list.) Unlock the "Network" preference pane, and click on "Ethernet" Click on Advanced, and select "Manually" from the "...


7

For reasons best known to itself, Apple chose not to include updated drivers for the A1277 adapter when it released Mavericks. In the screenshot you provided, the 'Product ID: 0x1402' in reference to your adapter reveals it was manufactured by ASIX Electronics, and further indicates that ASIX designates it internally as a model AX88772C. (This information ...


7

There are tools like Marco Polo that can change such settings based on location, but you will need to actually change your location, or have some other automated way to trigger this change. While there are some sophisticated servers and network hardware that can access multiple TCP/IP connections, and route different classes of network traffic to different ...


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