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16

As has been mentioned, you couldn't daisy-chain multiple Thunderbolt displays on pre-2012 Airs. Two possible add-ons that'll allow you to connect an additional external display: Matrox DualHead2Go (in action hooked up to an 11" Air) DisplayLink adapter I've used the latter and they work pretty well for non-intensive applications.


15

You can go to System Preferences > Displays, then option-click (press option key while left-clicking) on Scaled to expose additional resolutions that aren't exposed with a normal left-click. Otherwise, you have a great choice of software for that, like switchResX: Why hassling with Apple's inbuilt screen settings, when there is so much more to get and ...


13

Apple does not support Display Port daisy chaining. Using Thunderbolt screens, this would work, and because the Apple screen is a Thunderbolt screen, that works. The fact that Windows supports DP daisy chaining, does not mean that Apple does this intentionally to force users to buy their monitor. So... Never attribute to malice that which is adequately ...


13

We have a brand new Late 2016 Macbook Pro and 2 Apple/LG 21.5 USB-C 4K monitors. Daisy-chaining/MST does not work. We are using the monitors and nothing else with the original cables. Only way to get it to work is to connect each to individual USB-C ports on the MBP. Sad but true.


12

After doing a little research on Dell's daisy chaining monitors, I came across this bit of info on their support site: Multi-Stream Transport (MST), also known as Daisy Chaining, is a new connection specification that allows multiple monitors to be connected in series with the video signal being passed from the computer to a monitor, and then from ...


10

There should be an "Underscan" adjustment in display preferences. Open up the Displays in System Preferences. Have a look at your available resolutions. There should be a 720p, 1080i and 1080p, choose whichever is appropriate for your TV, and a slider labelled Underscan should appear. Adjust as necessary to get the picture right on your TV.


10

Your Air supports the internal display as well as only one ThunderBolt external display. As commented below, the Mid 2012 Air can run two ThunderBolt displays. Physically you can daisy chain as many Thunderbolt Displays as you have money, but the first limitation you will run into is the graphics card. The official Apple knowledge base article lists the ...


10

More than likely, the issue is, in fact, your Mini DP to HDMI adapter. The AmazonBasics Mini DisplayPort to HDMI Adapter adapter that you listed is a passive adapter (notice nowhere do they say "active"). Additionally, is much less expensive than an active converter like the Cable Matters Active Mini DisplayPort to HDMI Adapter Passive vs. Active So, ...


9

I own a 2013 MacBook Air. This is equipped with a Thunderbolt 1 port : Mini-DisplayPort -> HDMI adapter (1920x1200 max.) Mini-DisplayPort -> DisplayPort adapter (upto 2560x1600 max.) I've used both and am now driving daily on my MBA 13" with a monitor running at 2560x1440.


9

You can get full resolution with mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort or mini DisplayPort to Dual-link DVI. Dual-link DVI supports up to 2560x1600 pixels resolution. DisplayPort supports that resolution or even higher. You will not get full resolution with mini DisplayPort to DVI. DVI is limited to 1920x1200 or something similar. You usually won't get full ...


9

This may not be the only available resource on this topic, but it is a comprehensive & reliable one... EveryMac, as the name suggests, has information on every Mac model ever made [also iPhones, iPads, iPods], including but not limited to the number of external displays supported & their maximum specification. If you are not absolutely certain ...


8

The Apple press release says "supports DisplayPort for high resolution displays and works with existing adapters for HDMI, DVI and VGA displays", but this is referring to the Thunderbolt output port (for daisy-chaining). The Thunderbolt Display will not work with a non-Thunderbolt machine without an adapter. But unfortunately now that the they have started ...


8

According to this source, this should work. This other source confirms it. These are the troubleshooting steps I would try: Run all software updates on both the iMac and MacBook Air. A lot of times there are firmware updates that address issues like this. Open System Preferences > Displays and click Detect Displays. Reset the PRAM on both the iMac and the ...


8

As @bmike, @djacobson, and @jaberg have stated in comments, that will not work. There is currently (as of March 2012) no adapter, nor do I expect there to be one to adapt mini-DisplayPort to Thunderbolt. (The standards were defined to be backward-compatible, not forward-compatible.)


8

You should connect the monitor through DisplayPort. You will need a Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable for this. You will be able to get the full resolution of the display this way.


8

Any Mac that supports DP 1.2 technically supports daisy chaining. However, OS X does not yet support it. If you boot Windows on your Mac you will be able to daisy chain.


7

Yes. It usually "just works," but if you're having trouble, Apple has detailed instructions: Apple Portables: How to use your computer in closed clamshell (display closed) mode with an external display


7

Is it possible to use my Macbook Pro's display to receive inputs from other sources? No.


7

Finally I found this. Looks like the default EDID configuration for Dell displays is not quite right. On that post there's also a ruby script that suposedly generates the right file for your display, but it ended up screwing even more my resolution. I downloaded the file from the first post, and after copying it to /System/Library/Displays/Overrides and ...


7

I looked up the specs and that display supports 4K resolutions. 2011 model Macs do not support 4K displays. I understand that you're trying to run it at 2560x1440, which Apple specifically says that model MBP supports for external displays. However, here's the issue you're running into... To get that 4K resolution, you must have either an HDMI 1.4 or ...


7

Unfortunately no, not at present (10.10.1). Firstly, your MBP needs to support MST which is part of DisplayPort 1.2 - you can check your laptop's specifications as they may vary depending on which GPU option you went with when you purchased your MBP. Secondly, even if your hardware supports it (many recent MBPs do) Apple hasn't added support to OS X for ...


7

Solved! The solution is about as weird as the problem. To enable 60Hz in clamshell mode, I had to Option-click the "Scaled" radio button on System preferences' Display resolution screen, then the Refresh Rate option became available and I could switch from 30 to 60Hz. For some reason it wasn't enabled by default when lid closed. EDIT: Also found out that ...


7

I have a 2015 15" running the El Capitan Gold Master and it still mirrors the displays. I wish they'd sort this out, I'm wasting a Thunderbolt port by having to connect both displays independently.


7

I'm not sure if this answers the question but I'm testing this out right now with a new MacBook Pro Touchbar 13" with 4 USB-C ports. In the testing I'm using the Minix Neo C Hub which has 2x USB3 - Type A ports Gigabit Ethernet SD Card Reader HDMI Another USB-C that you can use for your power adapter I'm able to get two monitors working, one through HDMI ...


7

I would go for USB-C to DisplayPort directly. That would be one relatively inexpensive ($20 to $40 US prices) cable to do the job. Since your display won't charge the MacBook and do video over a single USB-C cable and you have several ports (display side and Mac side) - a dedicated cable would be my choice. I like the USB-C to HDMI adapter you mentioned for ...


6

Yes - you might be overlooking that all the Display Port adapters work perfectly well with Thunderbolt macs. Just place it at the end of the chain. It's not an issue since your VGA or HDMI device isn't going to have another Thunderbolt port in the chain to send the data further. You are necessarily connecting at the end of the line. The Moshi is my ...


6

Yes, but it's not worth it. You would have to take the laptop apart, design and engineer a custom converter to drive the LCD interface (internally, it's going to use LVDS to handle the interface between the laptop's motherboard and the screen), and power it somehow. It also would probably render the macbook from which you removed the screen unusable as a ...


6

If your other input sources are networked computers that are on the same network as your MacBook? You could use a VNC like program such as ScreenRecycler to let other computers show their screen on your Macbook.


6

According to this source, you will not be able to use a Thunderbolt cable in this fashion. You can, however, get a Mini DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort cable from Monoprice for about $5 and that should work just fine.


6

Another option to to use a display multiplexer, like the Matrox DualHead2Go DP. This will have much better performance (frame rate / snappiness) than the USB solution, at about 4X the price. It's best with matched dual external displays - or triple; there's also a 3-monitor solution. I haven't used one personally, but have recommended it to clients with ...


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