63

I needed to format a partition to ext3 on my USB flash drive. The drive was already formatted, and had 3 partitions, and I wanted to convert partition 1 from FAT32 to ext3. install brew, visit http://brew.sh/ install e2fsprogs using brew install e2fsprogs figure out the name of your partition or drive using diskutil list -- in my case, my partition had was ...


32

The encrypted volume's password is not required for erasing the disk, only to mount the encrypted volume on the disk. It's unclear whether you're being asked for the password only when connecting the disk, or when you attempt to erase it. In Lion, you can use Disk Utility to erase an encrypted volume, but not in Mountain Lion. However, you can erase the ...


23

There isn't any advantage to wiping and reinstalling OS X on a new Mac direct from Apple. You'll end up with the exact same drive contents. I can't think of any difference between an Apple-imaged Mac and a self-imaged Mac.


18

Before you're able to create a bootable OS X installer, you'll need to do the following first: Download the OS X Installer app from the Mac App Store. Mount the volume you want to convert into a bootable installer. This could be removable media such as a USB flash drive, or a secondary internal partition. You can then use the createinstallmedia tool to ...


18

OS X can default read NTFS disks, but not write to them. Possible solutions/options: NTFS for Mac OS X (10 Days Trial): I use this one, and it does the job very well. When the driver is installed, you format your NTFS disks with Disk Utility where you select Windows NT Filesystem as the format. Tuxera NTFS for Mac (15 Days Trial): I haven't tried this one,...


18

A better and simpler solution would be using the command-line. Execute the following command to identify the mount name of SD card following the pattern /dev/diskX, e.g., /dev/disk2 diskutil list Say the disk name is /dev/disk2. Now format the card to FAT32 by running the following command: sudo diskutil eraseDisk FAT32 MYSD MBRFormat /dev/disk2


16

After some trial and error, I finally figured out what the problem was and found a solution. Hopefully this will help those who come across this thread with the same problem. The problem: Reformatting using Disk Utility did not create a child partition, but only formatted the whole drive as FAT. In Disk Utility one can derive this from the "Partition" ...


15

There are several disadvantages: Most internet posts describing how to reinstall OS X miss the hardware specific diagnostic boot image that is stored on Recovery HD (this has changed starting with El Capitan 10.11). You will lose the iLife apps if you don't first boot the factory OS and claim those redemptions to an Apple ID. The recovery boot isn't a ...


12

So, here's what I did after much face-palming and cursing of Apple and their absolute disregard for their users: From the terminal: Identify your USB by NAME and IDENTIFIER: diskutil list Output is: /dev/disk3 (external, physical): #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: FDisk_partition_scheme ...


11

If your goal is to completely wipe all data which is on your current boot disk, then follow the procedure below. Insert the Mac OS X CD. Restart the computer. Immediately after the startup sound, press and hold the "C" key to start up from CD. When the Installer screen appears, do not click Continue. Instead, choose Installer > Open Disk Utilities. ...


11

The "Device / Media Name" is the partition label from the disk's partition map (GPT - GUID Partition Table). To change the label for a volume, you'll need to use the terminal. Get the disk number of interest: diskutil list Show the current partition labels (note the index of the entry you would like to change): sudo gpt show /dev/disk0 (replace disk0 with ...


9

In virtually all cases, you want GUID Partition Map. Only choose a different scheme if you have specific needs that require that scheme. GUID Partition Map provides the best compatibility and is the most current scheme. Without knowing what the error is, I can't say why you're unable to erase the disk. The top level item is the disk itself, whereas the ...


8

The built in “Erase all Content and Settings” function (found in the Settings app, under General → Reset) should be sufficient in virtually all cases. The 3GS and later iPhones, 3rd generation and later iPod Touches and all iPads use hardware encryption, where all data is stored encrypted in their flash memory. On these devices the wipe function simply ...


8

As long as the drive connects to your MacBook Air via a connection protocol that the Air supports like Thunderbolt or USB 2 or USB 3 you can format the drive and use it with your Mac just fine. To format an external hard drive on your Mac (paraphrased from here): Connect the drive to your Mac Open Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility On the left ...


8

If you don't need to use this USB disk on a Windows machine, format using Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Should you need to exchange files with Windows machines, then Format as you have with MS-DOS (FAT). ExFAT should work as well. It is not outside the bounds of possibility that the drive itself has gotten zapped somehow and is damaged, thus not operating ...


8

Buy a USB flash drive that uses hardware encryption, where the unlock mechanism doesn't depend a software client, then format it however you prefer. An example of this would be a USB flash drive with a a biometric sensor which can scan a finger, or a built-in keypad where you can enter a PIN to unlock the drive. Several vendors sell hardware encrypted flash ...


7

There is a good reason to choose a case sensitive file system. If you are concerned by the quality and the security of the applications you run you might be interested by any early mechanism which may discriminate badly programmed applications. An application which at one time create a file named conf and later try to open the same file with the name CONF ...


7

To most easily resolve this, you need to erase your USB drive with a "Master Boot Record" scheme. Steps: Open Disk Utility Select the USB drive Click "Erase" Choose Format "MS-DOS (FAT)" MOST IMPORTANT: Choose Scheme "Master Boot Record" Click Erase button Many thanks to nholtappels for figuring out the problem!


6

The next time you have your USB stick plugged in, open up Trash in the Finder, and you'll see the items that you have deleted in the trash. So, although you are "deleting" files from your USB stick, they are still there, and taking up space. You need to delete the trash when the USB stick is plugged in. This will solve your problem, as long as you remember ...


6

Install e2fsprogs brew install e2fsprogs Format disk sudo $(brew --prefix e2fsprogs)/sbin/mkfs.ext3 /dev/diskN


6

VideoLAN's VLC is the way to go here, I haven't found a movie file that it can't play.


6

One totally free way of doing things would be to install VirtualBox and create a virtual machine which will run your favourite Linux distro. You should be able to do this with minimal impact on disk space. I'd personally just use a common file format such as the universal FAT file system but obviously this isn't the answer you're looking for.


6

By default, HFS+ in OS X is case-insensitive. You have to specifically erase a partition and select case-sensitive for a partition to be case-sensitive. It's not that common, but there is software which requires case-insensitive HFS+. It's more common for legacy software to require case-sensitive HFS+. Of course, software should work on both, and most newer ...


6

It works if you create a JHFS+ volume first and convert it to APFS in a second step: DISK_ID=$(hdiutil attach -nomount ram://$((<number_of_blocks>))) diskutil eraseDisk JHFS+ "RAM Disk" $DISK_ID diskutil apfs convert $(tr -d ' '<<<${DISK_ID}s2) If the RAM disk has a size of 2 GiB (4 * 1024 * 1024)(block_size) or smaller no EFI partition is ...


5

Normally from the command line, you would use the diskutil command with the zeroDisk, randomDisk or secureErase options to securely wipe a disk. However, I would imagine this doesn't work on the disk you've just booted from. So I suspect you'll either have to find another Mac and connect yours in target disk mode via a Firewire cable, or physically remove ...


5

I've struggled for some days with the same problem but now it is solved. The problem was a faulty SATA cable. I've replaced it with a new one and now everything works as expected.


5

The following procedure should format your SD card to make it usable again and cause bad sectors on the card to be remapped if that is part of your problem. Warning, erasing the wrong drive could make you cry so make sure that you know what you are doing. Before inserting the SD card into your Mac, make sure that the write protect (lock) switch is turned ...


5

It's always better unless you must use the drive with an OS that is too old or too different to support the GPT format. Windows, Unix, macOS all support GPT / GUID and APM is not widely supported on other OS. To elaborate, GUID (or more properly GPT - the GUID partition table scheme) is the new bootable standard for Macs so use it unless you have macs that ...


5

The answer was that the default formatting was FAT32 which has a limit of 4GB per file. The answer was to format the drive. As I'm copying from Mac to Linux I chose the Ex-FAT format, all the better to interchange with. I used the Disk Utility which is within a 'Utilities' folder which is itself at the bottom of the applications list.


5

None of the HFS flavors will offer any performance benefit that's measurable. For that reason, go with the default format disk utility gives you and look to optimize elsewhere. I have seen encryption slow down some storage medium such as slow USB flash and I would expect journaling there to also be more of a slowdown than on storage with fast cache or more ...


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