New answers tagged

1

I don't fully agree with the steps outlined in the article you reference for resetting the SMC on a MacBook with the T2 security chip installed. Instead, try the following. Resetting the SMC on a MacBook Pro with T2 chip installed Fully shut down your MBP. Press and hold the power button for at least 10 seconds Let go of the power button and wait 5 ...


2

This behaviour is perfectly normal. On all of Apple's Intel-based laptops, the battery-pack is the power source 100% of the time, even when connected to a charging supply. The battery-pack is comprised of two circuits of cells, each circuit is capable of providing the maximum current demand of the laptop whilst the other circuit gets a recharge, with the ...


0

Using a USB voltmeter (at @n1000's recommendation), this is the Magic Mouse 2 consumption rounded to the nearest 10th: 0.5 Amps (2.5 Watts) while switched off 1.5 Amps (7.5 Watts) while switch on


2

Yes, that sounds normal. The cable is only designed to supply so much then the computer takes whatever else it needs from the battery. If the battery is too low and the demand high it will limit the cpu performance...


1

Yes, you can use an iPad Pro to charge other devices, including an iPhone. According to Apple: To charge your iPhone or earlier-model iPad that has a Lightning port, connect it to iPad Pro using the Apple USB-C to Lightning Cable. If you have a Lightning to USB cable, you can combine it with the Apple USB-C to USB Adapter, then connect the adapter ...


0

MacBooks have been able to demand more power from their battery-pack than is available through the charge supply for a long time, but that's because the Mac-top doesn't actually use charger supply to power the computer unless the battery is missing or faulted out of circuit. They run from the battery-pack 100% of the time, even when connected to charge. The ...


0

Here is the best article I've found on the subject of how to care for your Phone battery. It's brief, but authoritative. The main points are this: 1) Don't keep it plugged in when it's fully charged 2) don't "try to reach 100%" 3) Plug in your phone whenever you can In reading it again, I see keeping it cool is also important -- I'm glad I reread it to ...


4

No it doesn’t. The new hardware and iOS can handle kiosk mode / constantly charged batteries much better than the old controllers so you should just keep it charged if you like that. Your XR can be kept 100% topped off without any long term harm. I disagree with Mac World and only think you should shut down the phone if you don’t regularly do that from ...


0

Take it to an Apple Store soon!! The Late 2013 MBP is still supported by Apple, but the Early 2013 is not (so the Late 13 model is likely to go out of support soon.) A new battery will give your Mac years more life -- they actually replace the whole top case, including keyboard and trackpad.


1

Your battery is old even if it still has a low cycle count. You might even have a battery that has been damaged in production. In all cases you should not continue using your MacBook in this condition. The battery could start producing gases, inflating and destroy it in the process.


0

You could reset the SMC again, making sure you refer to Apple's documentation to double-check you've reset it properly. However, since the SMC reset hasn't resolved this (as one would expect), your battery status is most likely key to your problem. While MacBook Pro batteries have a life expectancy at or around 1,000 cycles, it's not uncommon for batteries ...


1

Try these solutions in the following order: Cleaning the lightning port*; Cleaning the inside of the case*; Instead of manually inserting the AirPods in the charging case all the way, insert just a portion of them, and let them fall in the case. The gravity and the magnetic attraction will place them in the right position, thus allowing them to charge. ...


0

This can be done by using the pmset -g batt command. The first line of output from this command indicates your power source, e.g.: Now drawing from 'AC Power' Or Now drawing from 'Battery Power' A possible use for this might be to change various commands together in a batch file, e.g.: pmset -g batt | head -n 1 | grep "Battery" In the above example, ...


1

The 'unlock to charge' is a new security feature since iOS 11.4. If you charge from a device that asks to communicate over USB you have to opt in. Alternatively, just plug in to a 'dumb' charger or employ a USB data block dongle / condom to physically prevent “juice jacking”. If there's no potential data connection, there's no restriction on charging or ...


2

The charger's serialization and capabilities are determined by the chip in the Magsafe connector. The Mac also controls the LED, not the charger. Understanding the charger's ID code You can easily pull up the charger information on a Mac (Go to "About this Mac", "More Info...", "System Report...", "Power"), but much of the information is puzzling. ...


0

There's no built-in IC inside the cable. All the logic behind the 1-Wire protocol happens inside the computer, the charging brick and the MagSafe connector. You can see a teardown of the MagSafe / MagSafe 2 connectors on the link below, where the actual communication process is also explained: http://www.righto.com/2013/06/teardown-and-exploration-of-...


1

I would start with resetting your Mac's System management Controller (SMC) and also checking your battery status. Reset the SMC To reset the System management Controller on your particular MBP, follow these steps: Shut down your computer Keep the power cable plugged in Press at the same time shiftoptioncontrol (on the left side of the built-in keyboard) ...


1

Based on the answers to this question the supply doesn't communicate with a power management chip - it simply looks for a resistance of approximately 40 kΩ between its output and ground, and if this is detected then the full output voltage is enabled. Also based on the above answers, if you often measure 0.2 V rather than 3 V then an intermittent fault in ...


0

Assuming that the monitors use an IEC plug on the backside, you can use an IEC cable splitter, like this https://www.amazon.com/Server-Splitter-Power-Extension-Cable/dp/B01G1JMFZQ/ to grab the mains power from the monitor power cable and gain an extra power plug. Then use an adapter like this https://www.amazon.com/SF-Cable-Prong-Adapter-60320-C14/dp/...


1

The USB ports in the Desktop and monitors don't provide enough power to charge your MacBook. These ports tend to be build "to spec", meaning they output only about 500mA (USB 2.0) or 900mA (USB 3.0). Sometimes PCs have dedicated charging ports (maybe colored yellow) which provide more than 1A (they exceed the official USB specs), but that's still not nearly ...


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