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In general you should be fine. In cases if it is not going to work, you will immediately know when you check the battery status in settings of your Android phone. It will usually say not charging. As other answers pointed out, if the device depends on QC 2 or 3 (marketed in different terms such as Motorola torboppwer) I found it not charging from MacBook Pro ...


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I would start by resetting the System Management Controller (SMC) which is responsible for power management and controlling the thermal environment of your Mac. Typically this covers things like interpreting and responding to various sensors, battery charging, sleep/wake/hibernation, the power button and restarts/shutdowns, LED indicators, and so on. To ...


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Excess amperage cannot "force" its way into a device (that's the danger of excess voltage). A device will only receive what it draws. That is an interesting question with a more nuanced answer: 'Smart' USB chargers, like those found on Amazon, determine the amperage they provide based on the draw trends of the plugged-in device; as long as the device is ...


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Very simply put... No. Amperage is 'pulled' by the device being charged, not 'pushed' from the charger. So, as long as the voltage is correct, the amperage can be anything. They are designed to handle being left on charge. Their inbuilt circuitry stops pulling charge once they're full. Potentially, if the devices on the 1A outlets are charging noticeably ...


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I have been struggling with the same issue for a month. I tried everything to solve the problem including SMC reset, removing battery and etc. Finally, ten minutes ago, I sprayed both the charging connector and charging port with electrical contact cleaner spray and the problem was solved! Before try it be sure you turned off your MacBook Pro.


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Yes, you need to replace it. I would definitely take it to an Apple Store or other Apple-authorised Repair Shop. A new battery for $130 will make your MBA 'as good as new', and restore its useful life for another 4 years. At the very least, you could sell it on eBay, making a feature of the brand new battery. Batteries can and do fail, and there's often ...


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I found this article 'About Mac notebook batteries' on Apple's website, click on the link to go to the article: About Mac notebook batteries In the report you submitted (in the first block) I read this: Condition: Replace Now That's probably not good, and I think you'll have to replace the battery.


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Don’t confuse the USB-C connector with cables that are actually dual purpose. A thicker cable almost always signifies an active cable that supports both high USB PD charging and Thunderbolt 100 W power carrying capacity. The shielding needed to allow 40 Gbps on Thunderbolt 3 / USB 4 is likely the reason Apple’s cable is beefier than others that are designed ...


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To answer my own question, according to Wikipedia, USB C cables can have different carrying capacities: All USB-C cables must be able to carry a minimum of 3 A current (at 20 V, 60 W) but can also carry high-power 5 A current (at 20 V, 100 W).[10] All USB-C to USB-C cables must contain e-marker chips programmed to identify the cable and its current ...


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The fact that the cable is thick does not necessarily lead to it's ability to reliably deliver a higher wattage. A thinner cable will deliver as much power as long it's a good quality cable that adheres to USB-C standard. USB-C is a standard, but that doesn't mean that all cables you can buy adhere to it. You could buy a thick cable that is poorly made and ...


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