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126

The system will choose the power source that provides the most power, and it will not draw power from the others. Apple has released a support article describing this: Your MacBook Pro draws power from only one power supply, even if more than one is attached—so using multiple power supplies will not speed up charging. If you connect multiple ...


21

You don't want to mix those two. Why? Because the USB-C port conforms to the USB 3.1 Power Delivery Specification whereas the Magsafe charger does not. Part of that specification includes the negotiation of delivered power. The Magsafe will not negotiate how much power is supplied. What it's looking for is the presence of the 1 wire charging circuit ...


18

When the phone operating system is off, the hardware still remains sensitive to the introduction of charging power to the 30 pin dock connector. Not only does this help in cases where the OS has frozen and run down the battery past the point where available voltage can even run the system (including the charging circuitry) but it also helps in the more ...


16

The ElecJet Anywatt One fills this need, for the purpose of powering a USB-C device from a MagSafe power supply. From the product page: Anywatt built-in self-developed LDR6032 smart chip supports the latest USB C Power Delivery & PPS protocol, Automatically recognize the end device needed power and adapt the voltage and current to best suit the end ...


12

From MagSafe Wikipedia page Pin 1 - Ground Pin 2 - V+ @ 16.5 V DC Pin 3 - Charge control pin Pin 4 - V+ @ 16.5 V DC Pin 5 - Ground The inner large pins are V+ (16.5 VDC). Measuring with no load will give 6.86 V DC; the full 16.5 V is provided to the proper load. The outer large pins are ground. The tiny center pin is a charge control pin that assists with ...


11

After some experimentation with a 2016 15" MBP, it seems that they are very flexible: A USB charger capable of 5 V, 2.4 A proprietary Apple signalling was recognized as providing 12 W of power, and an iPhone charger (which complies the USB BC specification) was shown as providing 5 W. The Nexus 5X charger, which provides USB-C 5 V, 3 A charging, was also ...


10

In my case, the problem was the temperature of the charger. Since it's currently winter in the southern hemisphere, removing the MacBook from charge causes the charger to cool down (since it apparently draws very little mains power when there is no load on the MacBook side). At some point when it is cool enough, it will refuse to supply power when the ...


9

Yes this is fine (assuming you refer to the 60W Magsafe) and this has been confirmed by Apple to be safe Although you should always use the proper wattage adapter for your Apple portable, you can use an adapter of a higher wattage without issue.


8

Most of the third party iPhone ones are mostly safe most of the time. However there isn't a good way to tell which ones aren't. Here is a teardown of an Apple one and a clone. I say most of the time since some of the safety issues are only problems if there are faults. But in a poorly designed one, faults can cause fire and/or shock. Also poorly designed ...


8

The physical MagSafe adapter remains unchanged from a pinout perspective (the shape has altered externally from a T shape to an L shape and back again) for almost every Macbook except the 2012 Macbook Air and Retina Macbook which use MagSafe 2; Adapters are available to connect a MagSafe power supply to these machines, but you cannot use a MagSafe 2 adapter ...


8

The battery is no where near that part - it's in the hand rest portion of the computer. Also, lithium polymer batteries don't really ooze liquids that would travel that far inside the computer, so it's probably the result of a spill near that area or just corrosion (rust) of the contact once the plastic covering has worn away. However, any liquid or ...


8

There are only 2 types of connector for iPhones/Pads; the old-style 30-pin & the new-style Lightning connector. The change to Lightning, for phones, is at iPhone 5; prior to that they were 30-pin. The output of a phone/pad charger has only 2 variations, 1A for phones, 2A for pads. Any device needing 2A or less will work on a 2A charger, a 2A device on a ...


6

You can use it, but how much actual charging goes on may be minimal. It depends how much power your MBP is drawing (i.e. if you're doing CPU or graphics intensive tasks, you'll draw more power, thus less charging), but I suspect the 45W won't do much more than slow the rate of battery drain. If your MBP is asleep or turned off, it should charge the battery, ...


6

If it’s a genuine Apple charger, you should be fine, those are universal. If it’s not (and it’s not unheard of for counterfeit items to be sold on eBay), all bets are off. See for instance Ken Shiriff’s teardowns of iPhone chargers to see what enormous differences there can be among charger designs and their safety: http://www.righto.com/2012/10/a-dozen-usb-...


6

Both use Lightning cable, so we are good there. Regarding power, the 12W charger is compatible with all iPhones. See product Compatibility section of 12W charger. iPhone Models iPhone iPhone 3G iPhone 3Gs iPhone 4 iPhone 4s iPhone 5 iPhone 5c iPhone 5s iPhone 6 iPhone 6 Plus iPhone 6s iPhone 6s Plus So you should be confident of ...


6

I was able to charge my MBP 2017 with the Nintendo Switch power supply, which offers a dual 5V-1.5A / 15V-2.6A output. MacBook negotiates the 15V output and gets 39W of power, which charged my Mac in approximately 3 hours while using it. Just in case someone lands in this page while trying to find alternatives to a forgotten power supply 😅


5

The short answer is: there's a better chance you want your phone ON than OFF. That's why Apple chose to make it turn on whenever there's a power source available.


5

Your mileage may vary. Most 3rd-party accessories use inferior parts or less rigorous quality assurance. They may work, they may not. Paying the extra $10 for the official Apple charger is probably worth it, when weighed against the risk of buying a new iPhone. Plus, any issues with official accessories will be covered by the warranty. Basically, it's hit ...


5

The adapter shown below, in Apple's World Travel Adapter Kit, will work in India.


5

No. You cannot damage a laptop by charging it with a charger rated more than what it originally came with. When a device has a power requirement of 10W it means it will only draw up to 10W. A power supply with a rating of 45W will supply up to 45W.1 A general rule of thumb is that you can always get a bigger power supply, never smaller. Think of it ...


5

So, to summarize, the port works for all functions (USB connectivity, display, etc) including charging downstream devices (like a smartphone), but you cannot charge the MacBook. Your SMC chip needs to be reset. Hold ^ Control⇧ Shift⌥ Option ⦿ Power from a powered off state. There is failed component in the charging circuitry. USB 3.1 (power delivery) ...


4

Yes. The wattage ratings are maximum and all iOS devices will only pull the current they need to charge. Should a device or an adapter get too hot to operate safely, they will shut off.


4

This will not affect the Mac at all. It will not charge faster. It will not damage your battery. It will not damage your adapter. Information on power adapters is detailed on Apple's support site: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2346


4

There really isn't any difference, there is no chance of anything bad happening regardless, although if you were particularly worried about this sort of thing, then frankly you would be better to turn the charger unit off at the wall socket first, after which it is utterly irrelevant (assuming you are using a wall charger). If you are charging from a PC ...


4

iPhone 5, 5S, 5C, 6, and 6+ all have the same ports and wires. I'm a bit confused what you're talking about, all the wires that come with the devices just plug in.


4

No, they aren't. Here you can find the two type of charger, 5W (iPod and iPhone charger) and 12W (iPad, iPod, iPhone charger) with compatibility list. The length of 30 pin connector is always the same (it is standardised for Apple).


4

It's unlikely they will actually damage your MacBook Pro by delivering too much power to it. But there are many cautionary tales to be found on the internet of third party chargers overheating, and occasionally catching fire or exploding. Technically, using a non-Apple charger without Apple's written permission may also void your warranty if anything did go ...


4

It sounds like you have an issue with your SMC. Don't worry, it should be easy to fix, here is Apple's support document on it. SMC Reset Since you have an Air, you will want to follow these steps. Shut down the Mac. Plug in the MagSafe or USB-C power adapter to a power source and to your Mac. Using the built-in keyboard, press Shift-Control-Option ...


4

The adapter that you should get is the 60W Magsafe with "T" Connector. From Apple's Support site: That said, I would get an Apple 85W adapter instead of the 60W. You will have more versatility if you decide to upgrade your MacBook to a different model down the road. You won't do any damage, 85W just means that's the maximum power draw the adapter will ...


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