5

No, there is nothing special you need to do. At the risk of oversimplifying things, the way that hybrid drives work is that they monitor the data being read from the drive and, over time, they identify what files are regularly read from the drive. The drive then caches the most frequently accessed files to the high speed NAND flash memory. The net result ...


5

There is no general „best backup method“, it always depends on your setup and on the assets you want to protect (whole disk or only user data, snapshot or history etc). This also means that issues with a specific method may or may not be an issue in your context. The problem described in the article does occur, but I‘ve seen this both with NAS and with USB ...


5

Carbon Copy Cloner essentially requires you to backup one Volume to another. It doesn't have to be the entire volume, there are some quite comprehensive filtering options, but it does need to be to a distinct Volume, not just another folder on the same one. It's always wisest to have a full bootable backup, just in case, but single folder backup is ...


4

No, you can't have CCC be able to unlock a drive without storing those credentials somewhere. The best you could do is create a new account that has the ability to unlock the drive and store those credentials instead, which unlocks the drive but not your primary administrator account.


4

Boot to Single User Mode with one (empty) backup drive attached. Execute the indicated standard commands: /sbin/fsck -fy /sbin/mount -uw / Get the disk identifier of the external backup drive: gpt -r show disk1 #(or disk2, disk3) search for the proper drive with gpt because *diskutil* won't work in SU mode Mount the external drive's main partition (e.g. ...


3

Strictly speaking, this won't be a Fusion drive as far as OS X 10.8 or 10.10 are concerned. The operating system will see the new part as a single drive, and Seagate's firmware will do all the "Fusion" parts on its own. This should be as simple as your previous storage upgrades.


3

If you want the partitions to be bootable, yes you will need a separate partition for each mac you're backing up. The only way to have multiple backups in the same partition is to separate them out into other directories, which is not something most (all?) computers will be able to handle when trying to boot. If you use Time Machine to do your backups, you ...


2

Based on the info in your question you should be able to restore an appropriate backup image to another external drive. Once you've done this, boot your Mac into the Startup Disk Manager (i.e. press and hold the option key as you boot up) until you see the drive options appear. Select the disk you've just restored the Snow Leopard backup to and press enter ...


2

Short answer Generally what you want to do should be fine, however there are some considerations (see long answer below). Long answer In years gone past macOS installations were configured as part of the installation process specifically for the hardware it was on. However, for quite some time now this is no longer the case. So, doing what you want should ...


2

There is one very important thing to do and that is to enable TRIM support sudo trimforce enable In OS X prior to Yosemite, you had no way to enable TRIM on 3rd party drives. But in Yosemite and later (10.10 and on) Apple included the ability to enable TRIM on non 1st Party (OEM) drives. Why TRIM? From Apple Insider: Part of the ATA standard, TRIM ...


1

Lightroom doesn't store images in the Lightroom catalog, it only stores the editing metadata. If Lightroom can not locate the images, they may be missing (!) or simply not where Lightroom is expecting them. The first step is to manually locate your images to confirm they are still in place on your harddrive (or wherever you had them). If the images are NOT ...


1

I'm assuming you've disabled SecureBoot, and that the volume name is identical in what follows: It's possible that the T2 chip on these new (2018) Minis makes 'straight' cloning difficult. I had the same problem when I cloned my old 2012 Mini's volume onto my 2018 Mini : I too got a flashing question mark. I was able to fix it by installing Mojave on top ...


1

Use “Migration Assistant” instead of attempting a direct restore. This mitigates hardware change issues, T2 issues, minor OS difference issues, some software licensing issues, and a few other potential issues.


1

Here's what worked Download the High Sierra installer from the App Store. Run the installer, choosing the external clone disk as the target. This will automatically create a new Recovery HD partition associated with the target disk. Reboot from the external disk. Hold down option key during startup to select the boot disk. Enable FileVault encryption as ...


1

In the end, I settled with Disk Utility. I know that CCC is typically faster since it copies in chunks but my goal was to create a one-time archive of an OS and then clone it to other drives whenever necessary so the benefit of CCC is less noticeable. I found a forum post on Apple's forum about an issue that seemed similar or possibly the same. The accepted ...


1

There is no problem cloning your old drive to a new SSD. Cloning will make an exact copy of the drive, so other than being solid state rather than rotational, there's no difference The one thing that you will want to do after you get your MacBook up and running is enable TRIM support. TRIM is the ATA command set that will "recycle" the deleted space on ...


1

You can restore the backup onto the SSD so long as the SSD fits the entire contents of the backup[1]. According to Apple's support pages, you do not need to use an Apple Time Capsule for backups: Time Machine is the built-in backup feature of your Mac. To use it, you need an external storage solution, sold separately: External hard drive ...


1

Have you done anything on the Sierra install that you wouldn't want overwritten? I've never tried restoring between different versions myself, but my guess is that it wouldn't be an issue—it'd just upgrade everything it needed to when you next logged in. As for doing it while you are logged in—I wouldn't try it. I would either log in under a different ...


1

In technical terms it is "messed up too much" for disk utility to handle. You now have two choices. Do as it suggests, back up and reformat or use a third party disk utility that might fix the issue. I'd do the latter but then I always have an up to date copy of diskwarrior already on hand. There are other disk repair utilities, that one is my personal ...


1

You can select a drive in Migration Assistant. That is how I transferred my old system to my new one. I simply mounted the drive of my old system on my new system, and then was able to select it as my migration source.


1

There are hardware specific builds of the OS that sometimes will run on one computer and not on another (due to drivers that are needed for certain models, etc). So this means that your MB Air setup will likely not work to boot the new MBP. See here for some info: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204319 For this reason, you want to transfer over your data ...


1

In answer to your question: YES. By way of explanation... CCC makes a copy of the file system, which is independent of what physical drives the file system is on. for example you could make a clone of a boot drive on a RAID-5 array and then restore it to a single drive with no problems. The file system doesn't change just because it is on a different kind ...


1

Copying data to a different drive negates the risk of losing all your data due to physical failure of your primary drive (as would be the case if you merely partitioned it and used the other partition as a backup). Since that’s the principle cause of data loss (way easier to repair a corrupted partition scheme than a broken HDD/SSD), it makes sense that ...


1

On Mac OS X Server 10.6.8, Sarah's replacement of $2 with $1 in the shell script for ejecting the destination does work to eject the source.


1

It's much simpler for the source, the following should be sufficient: #!/bin/sh diskutil eject "$1" Mike


1

You say the only difference between the two models is the size of the drive. This is an incredibly naïve statement. Although, I have not checked in depth, it would be a safe bet next model differs in hardware beyond the drive size. Let's look at the chronology. OS X 10.9 is released on November 22, 2013 MacBookPro11,1 is either a Late 2013 or Mid 2014 ...


1

It seems to be an issue related to AFP/SMB and invalid SMB characters. My two sparsebundles have an asterisk in them, resulting from the computer name. An asterisk seems to be an invalid character in SMB. Everything was fine until the El Capitan update. It seems in this update something changed with the AFP/SMB handling on OSX. I had to disable SMB on my NAS ...


1

No, there is no way. Time Machine uses Symbolic links to previous backups when it hasn't changed. You could use some form of ls -H combination with xargs to copy the latest backup some what safely, however, some times those symlinks are broken. Furthermore, CCC won't accept that, because it also need to record which files it has copied, so in future it ...


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