32

This should help identify what is going on in Johnny's answer, as well as answer the question of why this works on Linux but not Mac. The problem lies in the fact that Mac OS X uses bsdtar, whereas most Linux systems use gnutar. You can install gnutar on a Mac with Homebrew, using brew install gnu-tar, which will symlink gnutar into /usr/local/bin as gtar. ...


15

Unless you've disabled SIP and installed your own binaries in /usr/bin it's safe to assume that everything in /usr/bin (and /bin, /sbin, /usr/sbin) is pre-installed.


11

One indication you might look for is found at https://opensource.apple.com/release/macos-10141.html where you see that xar-404 is indeed used by Apple. To get a closer look at what is installed, you might use onboard tools check for some parameters: $ codesign -vd --verbose=4 /usr/bin/xar Executable=/usr/bin/xar Identifier=com.apple.xar Format=Mach-O ...


8

You can use pkgutil to determine by which installer a file was installed: $ pkgutil -v --file-info /usr/bin/xar volume: / path: /usr/bin/xar pkgid: com.apple.pkg.update.os.10.14.2.18C54 pkg-version: 1.0.0.0.1.1543558197 install-time: Thu Dec 6 11:31:26 2018 uid: 0 (root) gid: 0 (wheel) mode: 755 (?rwxr-xr-x ) ...


8

Using Homebrew (as requested): $ brew tap homebrew/dupes $ brew install unzip This will install unzip at (considering defaults) /usr/local/Cellar/unzip/6.0/bin/unzip You can then alias it as unzip6 somewhere in your path. Also, you may want to to try "The Unarchiver" from the app store. Much more useful IMO then Apple's Archive Utility. UPDATE dupes ...


7

The existence of a duplicate file in the archive should not make it invalid or unable to be extracted on OSX, as by default, tar overwrites duplicates. So, I'm a little confused by the behavior in your Gist - OSX tar allows for duplicate files in an archive (a throwback to its original purpose as a tape archive utility, so it allows files to be appended to ...


6

Turns out the OS X tar utility was the correct one! There was indeed an error in the archive. This email thread discusses it in more detail, but the problem is that there is a duplicate file in the archive. The SCIP guys are fixing the archive as I type this. [edit] The newly updated scip-3.2.0.tgz is now extracting just fine! The SHA-1 hash of the new tgz ...


3

You may find that p7zip does what you want. Use brew install p7zip to install, then run 7z -h to get some help. I'm using 7z t on a 20GB zipfile as I write this, to test its integrity. Both Unzip 5.52 and Unzip 6.0 choked on it.


2

I just had the same problem - usually the double click works but for some reason it didn't work on a zipped mp4 video. What worked was to right-click and choose 'open with' > 'archive utility'.


2

BetterZip includes a service for compressing files: You might also just use zip or tar from the command line: zip directory.zip directory COPYFILE_DISABLE= tar -czf directory.tgz directory Note that zip currently removes extended attributes and ACLs.


2

Safari doesn't handle the unzipping itself, it simply opens the zip with the default program, which is the OS X Archive Utility, unless you've changed it. By default, Archive Utility shouldn't delete zip files, but it's possible the preferences got changed. To stop the archives from being deleted, open Archive Utility, located in /System/Library/...


2

It's possible to put passwords on archives as a protection measure. The password here would be a user-chosen password when compressing the original content to the zipped archive that you're trying to open. Go back to the source where you downloaded the file and see if there's a password listed somewhere.


2

Archive Utility doesn't currently support .tar.xz files. You can provide feedback to Apple at apple.com/feedback. While Terminal can uncompress .tar.xz as you note, if you're looking for a GUI-based solution you can install: The Unarchiver which has support for .tar.xz.


1

The default install of macOS does not have an "Extra File" context menu - it seems like that could be a third party program / plugin. The default install of macOS comes with the Archive Utility for uncompressing for example ZIP files. It will preserve folder structure by default. So in your case, either you're using a third party extractor, that does not ...


1

The zip file cannot “self delete”. There is a setting for “Archive Utility” in most versions of Mac OS X / OSX / macOS where you can specify you’d like to delete Zip files after extraction. See: https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/delete-zip-files-after-extraction Check if you have this feature turned on: If you have this feature turned on already: ...


1

There's an alternative, free, lightweight archive software that I use for Mac OSX. It's called Keka and I use it to unpack 7zip most specifically. Moreover, it can unpack other types like .rar, .tar, .gz etc. It worked for the OP's specific tar file as well, but I attempted it after @Geoff mentioned the team was working on repairing the file.


1

Heres your script as promised. Any questions or suggestions? Comment below :) What the script does: Searches through a selected folder for folders. Searches through each one of those for files. If those files contain a specified search parameter then the file is moved to a folder in a location specified. Once all files are checked, the files in the folders ...


1

When a document opens with the wrong app the first thing to do is see what macOS thinks should happen. In Finder find a document Right click on it and choose Get Info Look at what Open with... shows If it is the wrong application alter it to be the correct one e.f. Word in this case. You might want to Change all as well. If it is the correct app then ...


1

Resource Forks are a part of Mac OS files that were mostly used on Mac OS "Classic" (Pre Mac OS X, E.G. Mac OS 6 - Mac OS 9) In earlier Mac OS, and on the HFS File System (and HFS+) files had two "forks", the "data" fork and the "resource" fork. The data fork is what all files today have; the resource fork was a proprietary data structure from Apple designed ...


1

Anything interesting in the console app (system.log or other activity)? Any chance you accessed any of these files from another app? Mail.app is notorious for never "closing" attachment files, so you might need to close the apps that might have the files open. It's hard to know what's causing it without attaching a debugger to the process and seeing where in ...


1

Right-click on the file and choose Open. This will automatically decompress the file with the built-in Archive Utility.


1

I wrote a Qt based utility specifically for handling and fixing double encoded filenames: https://github.com/dennis97519/EncodingConverter


1

Actually all you need to do is change the file extension from .JPG or .JPEG to .zip. If it is indeed a zip file the O/S' unzip program should unzip it. Failing that I use The Unarchiver http://unarchiver.c3.cx As a replacement for O/S X's built-in zip compression utility as it handles more formats.


1

The photos are actually fine (they are JPG) but the videos are of the .exe format (well not really). If one opens the .exe files with (for instance) the VLC player, they play fine.


1

The Apple's Archive Utility seems incapable to unpack some archives including some legitimate .zip files. I looked at several GUI alternatives to set as default instead of the Archive Utility and settled on The Unarchiver which seems to be a seamless replacement. If you have homebrew installed then it is: homebrew cask install the-unarchiver Open the app ...


1

Years later, but in case someone else comes across this, Canvas has written a very useful guide to .imscc files. It discusses why they're problematic on OS X: It won't work on a Mac, because the Mac adds junk hidden files to the zip file that cause the cartridge to not be recognized. There might be a work-around for getting zip files without extra junk ...


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