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Okay, I can answer by myself. In further investigation I came across the hidden space called local snapshot space that is caused by local time machine snapshots and tried to purge them for giving back at least 100 GB: ♠ sudo tmutil thinlocalsnapshots / 100g 1 Password: Thinned local snapshots: com.apple.TimeMachine.2019-12-07-134712.local com.apple....


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Your Late 2013 MacBook Pro does indeed have the integrated decryption functionality in hardware. It is not too old for that. It is integrated in your CPU. So that solves the riddle of whether or not the slow app loading times are related to not having that - it isn't. You can disable the encryption of the file system "without pains" by opening up System ...


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You probably were suppose to install Windows to BIOS boot, instead of EFI boot. However, if all the hardware is working, there is no harm in EFI booting. The fact that you do not see Windows label on the Start Menu is another indicator that you probably were suppose to BIOS boot Windows. I am not sure why you can not properly select Windows from System ...


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I am currently typing this from the system on the cloned 1 TB SSD, my solution was: Clone internal 500 GB SSD with Carbon Copy Cloner 5 to the 1 TB SSD (using QNINE NVMe enclosure) Swap 500 GB internal with 1 TB Sabrent Rocket NVMe Directly boot into Recovery Mode Added the missing VM container with the command: diskutil apfs addVolume disk1 APFS VM -role V ...


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Use Disk Utility or the asr command if you want native duplication. Tools like carbon copy clones and super duper are even better at this task so you’ve got much more tailored tools than the disk destroyer, dd https://bombich.com/ https://shirt-pocket.com/SuperDuper/SuperDuperDescription.html Every one of the above four tools won’t have any issues ...


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The other answer was mostly correct (see my comment), but I'm going to give my own simple answer here, for one because my answer comes from Mojave, not High Sierra, experience. While I was unable to delete local snapshots by using the specific tmutil 'delete' command, they were mostly deleted by the tmutil 'thinning command. I started with df reporting ...


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It turns out there was no way to change my SSD to APFS without formating. I ended up using "carbon copy cloner" cloned my SSD to internal hard drive, then formatted my SSD to APFS, and cloned everything back to SSD. All good now and I was able to upgrade without trouble.


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Try to use mounty: A tiny tool to re-mount write-protected NTFS volumes under macOS in read-write mode. Supports macOS from version 10.9 Mavericks till 10.15 Catalina.


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The new command to purge snapshots is seriously faster and more well engineered than the previous local store. It does require a new syntax, so you’re correct, Apple has forced us to learn more and change. Joshua was in your situation as well and has a very detailed explanation: How to thin your local Time Machine Snapshots on macOS High Sierra Apple ...


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Let's find out why Disk Utility isn't letting you convert your partition. In the Terminal, use diskutil list to determine the device node name for the HFS partition you want to convert (e.g. disk1s2) and then use diskutil apfs convert <device> -dryrun, e.g. diskutil apfs convert disk1s2 -dryrun. If it fails, edit your question, adding the output of ...


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Yes, this is definitely possible. I just created this exact setup with macOS Catalina (10.15.1) as the "main" OS, and a separate macOS Mojave (10.14.6) installation in an APFS Volume (same disk, same container). Follow these steps: Step 1 Download "Install macOS Mojave" archive Click on this link which will open the Mac App Store on the Mojave page. ...


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clonefile() is the system call that you're interested in. It was introduced in macOS 10.12 (Sierra), coinciding with the public beta release of APFS. copyfile() is a C library function that was introduced in Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard). As you have seen in the manpage, while it does support file cloning, this is not the default behaviour. I am not sure why ...


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I have recently created some tools that may assist you, though they do not currently directly support encryption (coming soon, hopefully): https://github.com/jivanpal/apfs-tools Using apfs-inspect to see the state of the APFS container superblocks would be my first step. Since the drive is encrypted, you won't be able to easily get much done until I add ...


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Rather than using diskutil RepairVolume, which runs fsck_apfs -y, let's first see whether the APFS container has any issues with fsck_apfs -n. That is, please share the output of fsck_apfs -n /dev/disk2s2. This will run fsck on your APFS container, answering "no" to all questions (rather than -y, which answers "yes" to all). Doing so will probably provide ...


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Even though you have now wiped the drive and are using your MacBook, I would strongly advise that you look at the SMART reports for your drive, especially if it is a traditional spinning HDD — mount: Input/output error suggests that your drive is failing. For future reference, if your drive is failing, a tool like ddrescue will allow you to create a byte-...


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Disk Utility and diskutil (which Disk Utility uses behind the scenes) are refusing to increase the size of your APFS container because your recovery partition, "Recovery HD", appears to be in the way (though, for whatever reason, Disk Utility is not making this apparent in its diagrams). This probably became the case due to a direct upgrade from a pre-APFS ...


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Apple doesn't appear to currently support multiple macOS installations installed in distinct APFS volumes within the same APFS container. To dual-boot two versions of macOS that use APFS, just do things the old-fashioned way and create two distinct APFS containers, each of which needs its own disk partition. As such, these two containers will not be able to ...


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Assuming that the affected disk hasn't been wiped, so that we can still work with it, let's get some more info about the disk's structures, since the output provided by fsck_apfs that you saw in Disk Utility isn't particularly helpful. We need to know more about the role of the malformed object with OID 0x148d6d that is mentioned in the output. Please ...


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Hopefully, you still have the disk image to work with! Whilst I cannot provide a complete solution immediately, I can at least provide some guidance. The output from fsck suggests that a node within the B-tree that represents the object map for your affected APFS volume is partially corrupted. Assuming that 0x40000002 in the line error: (oid 0x231dea) om: ...


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Answering this question myself so that I can mark it as solved; see the update to the question made on 2019-11-14.


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You can use the Disk Utility application or a combination of the hdiutil and diskutil commands. The files can be either full images (.dmg) or sparse images (.sparseimage). You can also create a sparse bundle which is actually a folder (.sparsebundle) containing files. The sparse bundle can be used, for example, to create a 10 GB APFS drive on a physical ...


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If you have a file that contains a raw image of a disk, you can use the following command in the Terminal: hdiutil attach -imagekey diskimage-class=CRawDiskImage myimage.raw If you haven't got an existing image, you can create a new, empty file named myimage.raw and then attach it without mounting: hdiutil attach -imagekey diskimage-class=CRawDiskImage -...


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