87

This is a daemon which is part of PackageKit framework and it's usually running as a background process for the "Software Update" GUI application. For example, if you open the Software Update application and check for updates, take a look at the Activity Monitor--you'll see the "installd" process doing a bunch of work. The reason it pegs your CPU is because ...


51

Memory pressure isn't a simple gauge of percentage of memory free and seems to be a 0 to 100% graph. The sysctl value of vm.memory_pressure is calculated in relation to a computed target that tracks the ratio between free and inactive memory pages to the wired and active pages. The absolute counters are viewed using the vm_stat command line tool to inspect ...


37

Go to System Preferences > Date and Time and uncheck Set date and time automatically. Close System Preferences, then reopen and re-check Set date and time automatically


31

killall kills by process name (which is definitively not 77439 and most probably also not Mathematica). You can use kill 77439 or (if this fails) kill -9 77439 instead (but if the process is really stuck, only a reboot will solve the problem). Also, due the the way sending/processing of signals (like kill -9) works in Unix/OS X, there are situations where a ...


30

To somewhat clarify and make that guess more accurate: memory pressure is a metric used by the kernel (xnu) with a dedicated thread called memory_status (previously known as Jetsam). This thread is responsible for detecting when the available RAM is low - which in OS X can force swapping, and in iOS kills the highest memory consuming app (as there is no swap)...


25

This is what I answered in a similar question. It did the trick for me. I had the same problem with NetBeans and this is what worked for me: sudo killall launchservicesd sudo killall Dock I hope this helps. I based my answer in this post: Can't kill Preview app and in previous knowledge. Check my answer here: App crashes, dock icon ...


22

This is a technology called Hyperthreading those i5 chips support. It means two threads can run simultaneously on each core resulting in two additional virtual cores. OS X's Activity Monitor only shows virtual cores, not physical cores. Likewise, a quad-core chip has eight virtual cores and that's what's presented in Activity Monitor. To sum it up: 1 CPU ...


18

So we found the Solution: Connect your iPhone/Camera and reopen Photos.app or iPhoto Close iPhoto or Photos.app Disconnect your iPhone/Camera Open Photos/iPhoto again now the PTPCamera Process should be terminated gracefully and won't spawn again in a busy waiting loop. You do not have to do this steps all the time, only necessary to terminate the ...


16

You can go to System Preferences > Displays, then option-click (press option key while left-clicking) on Scaled to expose additional resolutions that aren't exposed with a normal left-click. Otherwise, you have a great choice of software for that, like switchResX: Why hassling with Apple's inbuilt screen settings, when there is so much more to get and ...


15

Built-in Activity Monitor (Applications → Utilities) shows you network usage. Also you can see open network ports for each running process.


15

There is usually no correlation between a stuck process of top and a non-responding application: stuck means that the process is currently un-interruptible which usually is the case if the process is waiting for a disk or network data block to be read (or similar low-level stuff). Technically speaking the process is executing in kernel space (aka Unix ...


15

Your computer has 2 cores, but 4 logical processors. What you are seeing is Intel's hyper-threading technology. This technology puts multiple logical processors on a single core, so that each core can run multiple threads at once. The difference between this and multiple cores is that hyper-threading only duplicates the parts of the processor which control ...


14

Memory pressure is defined by two counters Mach keeps internally: vm_page_free_count: How many pages of RAM are presently free vm_page_free_target: How many pages of RAM, at a minimum, should optimally be free. You can see these easily using sysctl: morpheus@Zephyr (~/Documents) % sysctl -a vm | grep page_free vm.vm_page_free_target: 2000 vm....


12

I had a similar question about how to identify files and programs connected to kernal_task using the following terminal command: kextstat -l -k | awk '{n = sprintf("%d", $4); print n, $6}' | sort -n This will display various kexts and the memory associated with them. For example, 6184960 com.apple.driver.AirPort.Brcm4360 is a big hog for me, but I can't ...


12

For each process there is Real Memory (always at least as big as Memory) Total Memory currently consumed by an application (including Virtual pages) Memory Memory used in RAM Purgeable Memory Memory which can be cleaned by MMU, if another process needs more real memory. Then, for the system in total Physical Memory The amount of RAM installed. ...


12

iotop is available in macOS/OS X itself. iotop relies on dtrace though and you have to disable SIP in systems like El Capitan/Sierra to run dtrace. Check man iotop for options and then execute iotop as root : sudo iotop [-C] [-D|-o|-P] [-j|-Z] [-d device] [-f filename] [-m mount_point] [-t top] [interval [count]]


11

Take a look at the following folders: /Library/StartupItems ~/Library/StartupItems (if you have one) /Library/LaunchDaemons /Library/LaunchAgents ~/Library/LaunchAgents (if you have one) You should be able to figure out what the StartupItems do by name, but Google them if you're curious. You can figure out exactly what the Launch Daemons and Launch Agents ...


11

To add on to the existing answers and offer a different solution, you can securely erase the drive instead of just one user account. If you want to sell your machine but also include installed software, there is a better way to set this up that will ensure none of your personal data is on the machine, as well as provide a better box opening experience for ...


11

They are virtual and cost nothing to make. The VM hands out space to each program that asks for any but leaves tons of room to grow between each real allocation. These virtual addresses get mapped into the real RAM space as needed and mapped out when they are freed or otherwise inactive. They can even get paged to your storage if needed. You can reboot to ...


11

It's normally run when you for example install an App Store application or remove an application from Launchpad. It shouldn't stay running in the background or keep using that much CPU though. You can probably just force quit it from Activity Monitor or run sudo killall -9 installd. The binary is in /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/PackageKit.framework/...


11

I don't know of anything with that kind of detail, but Apple's own Activity Monitor [Applications/Utilities] can show a basic history graph per core. Cmd ⌘ 3 to initiate. System shows in red, user in green, btw.


11

For the top two figures, since last boot; for the bottom two, current. After comments: It may be since launch of Activity Monitor - I have mine launch at boot & it stays open all the time, so I probably didn't notice the potential discrepancy. The little graph is 'since switching to that tab', as it doesn't log more than about 5 minutes of data. This ...


11

It's probably the 'Spotlight' indexing that is busy indexing the drive 's content.


9

iStat Menus and its free Dashboard widget version iStat Pro can show you a good broad overview of your Mac's systems, but I'm afraid I don't know of any monitoring utilities that show individual application processes (ie Finder activity copying files) other than shell tools like lsof or top. edit I had forgotten about good old fseventer - last updated in ...


9

To answer your question which program is launching the softwareupdated: In your System Preferences, click on the App Store. It will show you the settings for updates. Normal is to have it check for Software Updates continuously, that will explain the softwareupdated running in your Activity Monitor. There you can also set what happens next, like download ...


8

As mentioned by @Christopher, heat can cause the kernel_task CPU to spike. The reason is listed in this post “Fixing” kernel_task CPU Problems in MacOS Lion 10.7. Apparently when the CPU heats up the ACPI_SMC_PlatformPlugin.kext will take up CPU cycles in an attempt to reduce actual CPU load. So one solution is to cool down your Mac (e.g. fan) through an ...


8

It seems that this feature – since Apple has changed the way how they display memory usage – isn't a option anymore: This is no longer an option, especially since Mavericks has new memory management routines (ie, memory compression) that make the charting of memory usage less straightforward. Apple has switched to a new "Memory Pressure" approach to ...


7

Create in Automator an Action to launch Activity Monitor: Then in System Preferences -> Shortcuts Tab -> Services set a keyboard shortcut for the created service:


7

You can try nettop(1) in the Terminal. It is pre-installed, and refreshes every few seconds to provide a dashboard of all open network connections with their usage. Better than lsof since it shows the usage data too. $ nettop Then hit 'd' and look for odd-looking entries or entries with consistently large traffic in the 'bytes in' or 'bytes out' column. ...


7

Those numbers match the Mach messages in/out counts, so you seem to be correct in not interpreting them as the objc_msgSend counts. You can learn more about higher level message counts by firing up Instruments (part of the freely downloadable Xcode toolset) and digging into a specific application to see what messages are being sent and when. It can filter ...


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