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My firewall asked me for a connection from lsboxd (module com.apple.ls.boxd, ) to one another computer in my network to the port tcp 548. What does it do? I found that it is a part of sandbox technology of a OS X, but what is it more specifically? I found it in my launchctl list output:

com.apple.LaunchServices.lsboxd
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lsboxd is part of the OS X Sandbox.

It allows communication between sandboxed applications.

lsboxd is in the Launch Services API. It is the Launch Services Sandbox Daemon, which governs what apps can launch apps in the OS X sandbox. You can peruse the App Sandbox Guide for more information about sandboxing.

PDF: App Sandbox Design Guide

  • yep, but what does the lsbox do? (I already noticed, that it is a part of sandbox, but it is too general) – static Aug 21 '13 at 0:37
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    Sorry, I realized now that you noted that. It allows communication between sandboxed applications. (I have a document on it, but I can't seem to locate it at the moment.) – Dave Aug 21 '13 at 0:49
  • great! it would be nice if you could provide a link on that (maybe it is possible to find it for the name?) – static Aug 21 '13 at 0:52
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    lsboxd is in the Launch Services API. It is the Launch Services Sandbox Daemon, which governs what apps can launch apps in the OS X sandbox. You can peruse the App Sandbox Guide for more information about sandboxing. developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Security/… – Dave Aug 21 '13 at 1:03
  • Then why is lsboxd invoked when I double click an ics-file to import an event into the Calendar? No interprocess communication going on then, is it? – d-b May 7 '14 at 17:49
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Go to System Preferences > Security & Privacy > Calendars and uncheck the box next to the lsboxd

Why this part of XCode needs access to your Calendar, is a different story.

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Isboxd behaves as spyware, because it is spyware. The fact that it is part of OS X does not "explain" or justify its spyware function. It snoops for more PERSONAL info about you, the MAC user - nothing new, I hope...

  • Could you cite why this is spyware? What information is "snooped" and to where it is sent? – bmike Mar 5 '15 at 19:58

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