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I need a way of extracting EXIF GPS data, using my Mac, from a bunch of photos taken on an iPhone. So for example, if I put 1000 photos into a folder, I want an easy way of extracting all the GPS data for each photo into a text file.

A solution which gets me close will probably be good enough. I've looked at Automator but don't see a built in way to do what I need. I have Aperture, iPhoto and Photoshop CS4 on my Mac in case someone knows a way of incorporating those applications.

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With Commandline tools this is easy:

  • Install Homebrew
  • brew install exiftools in the Terminal
  • find ~/Pictures/ -iname '*.jpg' -print -exec exiftool -DateTimeOriginal -GPSLatitude -GPSLongitude {} \; in the Terminal
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There are a number of CLI utilities and scripting libraries available in Fink, MacPorts, and Homebrew available to extract and manipulate EXIF data.

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    exiftags or exiftools work well. – user588 Mar 10 '11 at 0:13
  • Is there any way to do exactly that but on a Windows laptop? – Y.G. Feb 19 '15 at 5:12
  • @y.g Sure replace it with a Mac 😎. Actually, you can run exiftool on a PC. sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool Don't know about the find command. You can install unix tools on a pc. – historystamp Jun 1 at 21:54
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exiftool can also be used to generate a GPX file which can be processed by other GPX-aware programs. You can download the gpx.fmt template from the exiftool website:

exiftool -p ./gpx.fmt *JPG > output.gpx

Some useful options:

  1. -if makes exiftool only process files with a gps tag,
  2. -fileOrder allows processing in a forced order,
  3. -d allows formatting the datatime string.

For example:

exiftool -if '$gpsdatetime' -fileOrder gpsdatetime -p ./gpx.fmt -d %Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ *JPG > output.gpx

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