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I downloaded sudo for os x 10.7 from the following link, I followed the readme instructions, but when I call sudo -V I still get the old version number. I can see the folders related claim to have been changed at the time I ran the suggested command.

Any ideas?

http://archive.hmug.org/BSD/Administration/System/sudo/1.8.6p7/

  • Where does it install - there seems to be no documentation – user151019 May 10 '13 at 23:39
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The command sudo tar -C / -zxf sudo-1.8.6p7-1-osx7.tar.gz should be working, assuming you are in the same working dir as the downloaded file.

You could add --overwrite to the command, but this may have unintended effects...

I don't quite understand your desire to replace the stock sudo with this seeming random, and unsupported 'update'. If this goes wrong, you may be left without sudo; or you could break more than sudo.

You could uncompress without the -C /, and manually move the files into position.

  • For security purposes at work they want this version of sudo installed on all OS X platforms – FaultyJuggler May 11 '13 at 17:46
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Is /usr/local/bin before /usr/bin on the path?

If not, add export PATH=/usr/local/bin:$PATH to ~/.bash_profile or change the path some other way.

  • current PATH /usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/opt/X11/bin:/usr/X11/bin I'll try moving /usr/local/bin forward – FaultyJuggler May 13 '13 at 17:00
  • That does make the new version come up, but I need to update sudo for all users – FaultyJuggler May 13 '13 at 17:03
  • You can also change the path in /etc/launchd.conf. If there are other programs in /usr/local/bin/, overriding the default versions might have unexpected side-effects though. – Lri May 13 '13 at 17:18

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