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I have a MacBook Air M1 and two different solar batteries* that have 100W USB-C outputs. Can plug the USB-C cable that came with my computer from the USB-C output port on the battery directly into the USB port on the MacBook Air?

*Bluetti EB70 and PowerWorks PSE701

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  • Are you asking whether your cable will work? Why not try it?
    – benwiggy
    Commented Feb 22, 2023 at 7:36

1 Answer 1

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Can plug the USB-C cable that came with my computer from the USB-C output port on the battery directly into the USB port on the MacBook Air?

Check with the manufacturer first

The technical specifications are lacking in detail to say the least. Here’s a summary of what was found after some research:

  • For the EB70 it specifies 2 USB-C ports at 100W maximum.

    • It DOES NOT specify if that is 100W per port or 100W for both ports
    • It DOES NOT specify USB-C PD (Power Delivery) compliance. This would indicate that the port(s) is capable of delivering up to 100W of power and could negotiate the power delivery with the device. Unfortunately, it makes no mention of this capability.
    • The USB-A ports specify 2 ports at 5V at 3A or 15W. Similar to the USB-C ports, tt doesn’t specify whether that’s 15W per port or in total. Either way, the best that these ports can manage is simultaneous charging of two iPads.
  • The PSE701 is not available on the manufacturer’s website. The closest model is the PS70. However, on the Amazon listing for the PSE701 (see image below), it specifies one USB-C port with PD and QC 3.0 (quick charge). I am assuming that this is USB-C Power Delivery Specification 3.0 (their wording seems jumbled). However, on the image, it specifies QC 3.0 on the USB-A ports.

    enter image description here

Should you plug it in?

Until you get a definitive answer from the manufacturer, it’s highly advisable to use the power adapter that came with your Mac.

Why?

The marketing verbiage is suspect. The specification in the image says it’s compliant, but the verbiage from Amazon is not quite correct; it doesn’t give a sense of confidence that this is a well put together product and it’s actually USB-IF compliant.

Additionally, as there is no product page for the PSE701 and the EB70’s technical specifications are also vague as to what the USB-C power capabilities are, it gives reason to pause before plugging in an expensive MacBook into this power source.

TL;DR

Use your MacBook USB-C charger in one of the (NEMA 1-15R) receptacles. The technical specifications where available are vague and not worded correctly. Don’t risk an expensive Mac on a power source that isn’t clear with what it can deliver.

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