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I am trying to stop sound played on the laptop to be captured by my microphone but I cannot figure a way out.

I am running on macOS Monterey.

The audio I have played on the laptop could be heard, I checked this with my friend during a call today using the laptop. Is there is a way to stop this?

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    – bmike
    Commented Jul 7, 2022 at 15:20

2 Answers 2

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macOS expects you to manage sound output with mute or other volume controls so you can use the speakers to hear the call and keep playing music or other alerts (maybe a second call will come in while you’re on the first).

Rather than automating a ducking or pause, you might want to consider using a pair of headphones with an attached boom microphone connected to your computer. The model I've linked to we've used for Advance Placement Language testing in my school and they are comfortable and work perfectly. The mic picks up only your voice when positioned correctly, and the ear cups shield most ambient sound. They work with any 4-conductor headphone/mic input, and we have used these successfully on Macs, iPads, Windows laptops and ChromeBooks. There are many other models available.

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  • Forgive the edits, I hope we have a good question and good answer despite the initial version of the question not being up to standards for the site.
    – bmike
    Commented Jul 7, 2022 at 15:23
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What you're asking is (technically) "impossible" although there are a few workarounds.

The problem is that you're asking for the microphone to selectively avoid doing its job. If there's noise going into the microphone, it WILL get picked up. That is the whole purpose of a microphone.

Many modern call and conferencing programs attempt to do "ambient noise reduction" through a variety of algorithms. Mac OS comes with something similar built in. However, none of these are foolproof. The algorithm makes its "best guess" to determine what you want to speak, and what is ambient noise. Other algorithms may attempt to read the computer's current audio output and "correct" for it.

The only foolproof way to solve your problem is to PREVENT the microphone from "hearing" your speakers.

You could listen to audio over headphones. Or you could use "push to talk" (mute the microphone except when you push to speak).

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