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I was looking up my some information with the command

ifconfig

To my confusion there I had two ipv4 addresses that both look correct.

en0: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
    options=400<CHANNEL_IO>
    ether 3c:22:fb:00:eb:31 
    inet6 fe80::1cec:b2f:3933:1ecb%en0 prefixlen 64 secured scopeid 0x5 
    inet 192.168.0.143 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.168.0.255
    nd6 options=201<PERFORMNUD,DAD>
    media: autoselect
    status: active
en11: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
    options=400<CHANNEL_IO>
    ether 72:70:0d:b8:be:07 
    inet6 fe80::c6c:6cae:cd7f:ad07%en11 prefixlen 64 secured scopeid 0x6 
    inet 169.254.89.196 netmask 0xffff0000 broadcast 169.254.255.255
    nd6 options=201<PERFORMNUD,DAD>
    media: autoselect (100baseTX <full-duplex>)
    status: active

At first, I thought one was for my physical line and one was for wifi. But when I connected my physical line a third one that looks similar popped up.

The wifi and the physical one seems to be beginning with 192... so the odd one out is the 169.254.89.196 is there any way I can find out what this is used for? I'm running a mac on Big Sur.

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  • 1
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Link-local_address explains what it is, it doesn't explain why your Mac is using one
    – nohillside
    Jul 13 '21 at 20:13
  • It’s entirely normal to have two networks on a computer to connect to two networks. What might you be trying to do or understand?
    – bmike
    Aug 28 '21 at 1:55
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I believe that it has to do with a plugged in iOS device. The 169.254.0.0/16 subnet is considered a local-link IP address. For me, it popped up when I plug in my iPhone and the interface disappears when I unplug my iPhone.

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