0

My MacBook (Big Sur) has a problem about once a week when it stops being able to access the internet. Why do I think this is a problem with the Wifi processes? When I go up to the Wifi symbol in the top bar (the one that shows the signal strength), if I try to turn off the Wifi with the slider it just ignores it and keeps showing full signal strength (not greying them out). Trying to select another Wifi router just ends up with it spinning, more fiddling eventually makes the machine hang. The only solution I've found is restarting the laptop, but that takes forever as every app running refuses to restart until it's been able to talk to the network (that isn't there). Eventually it says my computer restarted because of a problem. It's not the router as other laptops are fine, they keep running, it's just this one.

So I'm hoping to find a way to avoid a full restart - is there a way to kill the processes that handle the Wifi?

p.s. someone already asked this question, but no-one answered it exactly, they gave an answer on how to type something in the terminal to turn the wifi off and then on again. I've tried that, the command doesn't complete - the command just hangs forever, and even control-C doesn't bring it back.

2
  • 1
    You are asking the wrong question. You are not addressing the true problem. There is something wrong with your Mac. Install EtreCheck run a scan and add the report to your question. EtreCheck will reveal details about what’s running on your Mac without revealing personal info. Jul 2, 2021 at 0:09
  • sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder
    – BabyBoy
    Aug 1, 2021 at 21:11

2 Answers 2

1

Killing running processes often makes things worse since they don’t save files and preferences and cause corruption. If you had bad hardware or drivers, there’s slim chance things would work for a week.

Sadly, you may have to triage this a bit to understand what happens in the 30 minutes before a hang happens. The things you are doing to “maintain” the system are highly likely to be the cause of the hang, and not the cure in my experience.

Logging out each night and let the computer run should prove the wifi is stable and this is a user app issue or memory leak / corruption issue.

1
  • 1
    This. The OP has presented a classic XY Problem. The asked question is "How to kill wifi processes?" The real underlying issue is "Why does the wifi fail?" Jun 27, 2022 at 20:30
0

That sounds super frustrating, I’m sorry to hear that. I don’t have any suggestions on how to solve the Wi-Fi issue. I have two suggestions on things you can try when it happens.

  1. When you need to reboot, go to Terminal and type sudo shutdown -r now (and enter your admin password when prompted) and it should reboot faster. I realize it’s not a “solution” but in the meantime it may help reduce some of the frustration associated with it.

  2. You could also try setting up a separate location with no devices:

Go to System Preferences » Network:

enter image description here

Click the “Location” dropdown:

enter image description here

Choose “Edit Locations…”

enter image description here

Click the + which will create a new location.

enter image description here

Name the new location “Airplane Mode” (or whatever):

enter image description here

Select all of the devices (See #1 and #3)

enter image description here

and click the after each (#2 and #4) to remove them all.

Once they are all gone, click “Apply”.

Once you have more than one location defined, there will be a new "Location" menu which you can use to switch between them.

enter image description here

Most of the time you will want to stay on "Automatic" but try the "Airplane Mode" when the Wi-Fi flakes out.

It's not a fix. But it might help mitigate the problem in the meantime.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .