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I am currently working remotely due to the pandemic. I am one of very rare Mac user at my university. In Poland Macs are not popular, and our net administrator and our tech support have no or limited knowledge on macOS. I use desktop MacMini (at work) and MacBook Air (at home) both logged in with the same AppleID, running on Big Sur. I have installed Apple's Remote Desktop (v.3.9.4.) on my MacBook Air and want to connect remotely and work on my MacMini at work (screen sharing). I already contacted Apple's Tech Support and learned that to access remotely from different network router at my university's network has to have set a port forwarding (ports 3283, 5900). Can anyone provide me more details on that? I got feeling that I need a ready solution when I contact my net administrator with that to overcome unwillingness to tackle new problems.

Best regards, Marcin

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There are a couple of ways to approach this. One is via use of the University's VPN, which would put you right on their network and keep your IT department from having to do anything besides allow you to log into their network via the VPN. This would be my preference as it is common, secure and puts your home Mac right on the same network with your Mac at university.

But you don't mention that there was a VPN involved, so...

Take those port numbers and the IP address of your Mac at the university and your Mac at home and talk to someone in the IT department.

What they will do (if they allow this) is forward your home IP address to your work IP address via those two port numbers. It is all done by your IT department. When they are done with this they should give you an IP address to connect to from home. This IP address will, in effect, be your Mac at University. You would plug that into Apple Remote Desktop at home and it should (if everyone has done their jobs right) connect you from home to your University Mac.

Note that your University IT department might recoil in horror at what you are suggesting (I would, we don't do this where I work) as it could be a security risk. So your best bet is to see if they have a VPN that you can use.

We can help you with that too, but that would be a different question, separate from this.

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    Thanks for your advice, especially your comment "...your University IT department might recoil in horror at what you are suggesting (I would, we don't do this where I work) as it could be a security risk." I always thought that my Univ IT people just ban everything just in case. Happy to hear about VPN, I think we have it. Best regards, Marcin (ps. I would upvote your answer, but I'm newbie here) – mschmidt Mar 22 at 18:13

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