1

So for the past few years, I've been under the impression that with any modern macbook (e.g., 2015 and later), it's better for the battery health to leave it plugged in as often as you can since the battery deteriorates based on cycle count, so if you leave it plugged in, it's not using the battery and thus not increasing the cycle count. Then I saw this article from last summer https://www.macworld.com/article/3564563/dont-keep-your-mac-laptop-charged-to-100-percent-all-the-time-heres-why.html that seems to contradict what I've seen suggested the past few years, which is recommending that your unplug your laptop daily and let it drop to 30-40%.

So I am confused on what advice to follow. Each dichotomous suggestion seems to have a basis, but which one is valid?

1
-1

The Macworld article reflects best practice. The battery is designed to be used.

I wouldn't be too concerned about dropping the charge to 30% every day. Even dropping to 80% will help. For a long healthy life the battery should be used.

Of course, if you keep it plugged in all the time you don't have to be worried about keeping the battery healthy!

Just to say it again: The battery is designed to be used.

2
  • I practically use all my laptops like a desktop during the day, so leaving it plugged in is not a problem. I'm not sure I'm understanding correctly, but doesn't "For a long healthy life the battery should be used." contradict "Of course, if you keep it plugged in all the time you don't have to be worried about keeping the battery healthy!"? It seems the former is saying it's healthier if the battery is used, but the latter is also saying it's healthier if the battery is not used (plugged in all the time)?
    – anonuser01
    Feb 19 '21 at 4:22
  • I was being somewhat flippant about not worrying if always plugged in. If you keep it plugged in all the time, the battery will gradually deteriorate so that on the rare occasion when you want it unplugged you will lose charge more quickly (compared with doing as the Macworld article suggests).
    – Gilby
    Feb 19 '21 at 4:31

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .